Zingerone

mnitabach

Basenotes Dependent
Nov 13, 2020
OK I replaced vanillin at 0.5% w zingerone at 0.5% in a fougère composition & it was a very interesting experiment! It had strong top & heart effects that are not what would've predicted just from the smell of the molecule in isolation. Sounds goofy but it would have to compare it to simply removing the vanillin in order to disentangle effects of adding zingerone vs removing vanillin..
 

parker25mv

Basenotes Dependent
Oct 12, 2016
Look at the molecular structure for zingerone and then look at the molecular structure for vanillin.
They are very similar, except zingerone is a ketone instead of an aldehyde (these two groups are still kind of similar in the world of smells), and the tail on which that group is connected to the rest of the zingerone molecule is longer.

(If you want to see another interesting relation, compare the molecular structure of zingerone to raspberry ketone. They are identical except zingerone has an additional methoxy group on the ring, something that typically makes things smell sweeter)

Zingerone is said to be the smell of cooked ginger (not raw ginger, which is something else).
 

acidnbass

Basenotes Member
Jun 29, 2015
Zingerone to me is like candied ginger, specifically that first crunch through all the sugar before the inner gingeriness really hits. This impression is partly tied to the bizarre way it affects me—the way it triggers my trigeminal nerve, it actually makes my teeth ache! So that crunchy sugary ginger aspect really comes through.

The fact it comes up in the heart/top more than the vanillin makes sense to me—I find it easily stands on top of other scents, and even in small doses screeches above the noise in its subtle sugary way. It's got a similar powderiness too, but more cold, like fine frozen fur, than vanillin's soft supple velvet.
 

mnitabach

Basenotes Dependent
Nov 13, 2020
Zingerone to me is like candied ginger, specifically that first crunch through all the sugar before the inner gingeriness really hits. This impression is partly tied to the bizarre way it affects me—the way it triggers my trigeminal nerve, it actually makes my teeth ache! So that crunchy sugary ginger aspect really comes through.

The fact it comes up in the heart/top more than the vanillin makes sense to me—I find it easily stands on top of other scents, and even in small doses screeches above the noise in its subtle sugary way. It's got a similar powderiness too, but more cold, like fine frozen fur, than vanillin's soft supple velvet.

I love this description & it definitely tracks w my initial observations of zingerone effects in blends!!!
 

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