Your Vintage Scent of the Day (SOTD) Q2 2021

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Bavard

Wearing Perfume Right Now
Moderator
Basenotes Plus
Jul 20, 2015
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Re: Your Vintage Scent of the Day (SOTD)

It's Q2 proper and I have applied some Polo Crest to while away the morning hours.

A906479D-B6C0-462A-BFE4-924F3BE11C34.jpg

I'm smitten with the opening.
 

Varanis Ridari

The Scented Devil
Basenotes Plus
Oct 17, 2012
Re: Your Vintage Scent of the Day (SOTD)

@ Nosey & Cologne Cabinet who I couldn't reply to in the old locked thread:

Funny people think the medallion is worth anything when separated from the Brut bottles.

IMG_20210331_181935_389.jpg

Kenzo pour Homme by Kenzo (1991)
 

Mudassir

Well-known member
Jun 17, 2007
Re: Your Vintage Scent of the Day (SOTD)

Rochas Femme. Lots of perfectly unisex women's classics in the past 2-3 weeks!
 

RCavs

Well-known member
Sep 13, 2004
Re: Your Vintage Scent of the Day (SOTD)

Not necessarily a vintage, but It's from 97, so...
black-jeans-versace.jpg
 

Cook.bot

Common Lackey
Basenotes Plus
Jan 6, 2012
Re: Your Vintage Scent of the Day (SOTD)

Vent Vert (1947) by Germaine Cellier for Balmain

I only own two minis of this and have been looking for a good vintage bottle for ages. The two contemporary bottles I have aren't even worth discussing.

Very nearly perfect for the first day of April, it's a big middle finger to winter.

VentVertBalmain_mini.jpg
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
Re: Your Vintage Scent of the Day (SOTD)

I'm lagging and didn't quite get to finish up last night's SOTE, so…

86A0F323-A2B4-48F6-99E4-984D1B95F294.jpg

3/31 SOTE: Sterlé - Huit-Huit (1955)

Pierre Sterlé was a fine jeweler and not-so-fine businessman who began dabbling in perfume in the mid-1950s. Although about a dozen fragrances were issued under the Sterlé name, he only created two himself: Huit-Huit (named for a diamond cut he was fond of using) and Diam’ (three guesses). At the time of its release, Huit-Huit was advertised as the most expensive perfume in the world, running $70 ($678 in today's dollars) for 10ml. Sterlé had formulated the perfume and designed the bottle (a cut crustal flacon incorporating two gold rings) without taking into account all the costs of manufacture, and even at the 2021 equivalent of over $2K/oz., he ended up taking a significant loss. Nominal perfumers from Jean Patou to Clive Christian could relate. Creative bookkeeping could only carry Sterlé so far: by the end of the 1970s, he sold the jewelry company and stayed on as a consultant, and the fragrances were discontinued. Roja Dove, take heed.

Notes from Cleopatra's Boudoir:

Top: fruity note, Japanese camelia
Heart: Bulgarian rose, orris, violet, jasmine
Base: amber, vanilla, honey, spices, musk

Yeah, all that, as far as I can tell, but mostly a dark Bulgarian rose, which I'm guessing is what folks call "jammy." I thought I smelled opulent. My wife thought I smelled like a whorehouse—but an interesting whorehouse. And, really, what other kind would be worth visiting?
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
Re: Your Vintage Scent of the Day (SOTD)

E2EA789C-3837-4C44-994A-8E124D39AACB.jpg

SOTD: Sterlé - Diam’ (c.1955)

A "floriental" with the following notes from Cleopatra's Boudoir:

Top: neroli, bergamot, lily of the valley, lilac
Heart: orange blossom, rose, jasmine, gardenia, ylang ylang, and heliotrope
Base: benzoin, styrax, sandalwood, ambergris, musk, and vetiver

Another route to jammy rose, similarly sumptuous to Huit-Huit. Pierre Sterlé knew what he liked. My notes from last night state that he composed this himself, which might be a slight exaggeration. In designing his jewelry, Sterlé didn't do his own sketches, but rather described how he wanted things to look and had an assistant do the actual drawing. I'm guessing he dictated to a perfumer in the same way. That's not to say he didn't have a hand (and nose) in it, only that I doubt he composed two fragrances solo without training or experience, and then just stopped.

Anyway, beautiful old-school stuff that smells of money, even if it's hourly.
 

Mudassir

Well-known member
Jun 17, 2007
Re: Your Vintage Scent of the Day (SOTD)

I'm lagging and didn't quite get to finish up last night's SOTE, so…

View attachment 150259

3/31 SOTE: Sterlé - Huit-Huit (1955)

Pierre Sterlé was a fine jeweler and not-so-fine businessman who began dabbling in perfume in the mid-1950s. Although about a dozen fragrances were issued under the Sterlé name, he only created two himself: Huit-Huit (named for a diamond cut he was fond of using) and Diam’ (three guesses). At the time of its release, Huit-Huit was advertised as the most expensive perfume in the world, running $70 ($678 in today's dollars) for 10ml. Sterlé had formulated the perfume and designed the bottle (a cut crustal flacon incorporating two gold rings) without taking into account all the costs of manufacture, and even at the 2021 equivalent of over $2K/oz., he ended up taking a significant loss. Nominal perfumers from Jean Patou to Clive Christian could relate. Creative bookkeeping could only carry Sterlé so far: by the end of the 1970s, he sold the jewelry company and stayed on as a consultant, and the fragrances were discontinued. Roja Dove, take heed.

Notes from Cleopatra's Boudoir:

Top: fruity note, Japanese camelia
Heart: Bulgarian rose, orris, violet, jasmine
Base: amber, vanilla, honey, spices, musk

Yeah, all that, as far as I can tell, but mostly a dark Bulgarian rose, which I'm guessing is what folks call "jammy." I thought I smelled opulent. My wife thought I smelled like a whorehouse—but an interesting whorehouse. And, really, what other kind would be worth visiting?


Interesting history. Roja Dove is all set for now though. As long as Arab sheikhs keep on flocking to Harrod's, anything that Harrod's visibly props up would sell. I wouldn't be surprised if he does more business at Harrod's itself than everywhere else combined.
 

Jean-Sté

Well-known member
Jan 1, 2021
Re: Your Vintage Scent of the Day (SOTD)

I'm lagging and didn't quite get to finish up last night's SOTE, so…

View attachment 150259

3/31 SOTE: Sterlé - Huit-Huit (1955)

Pierre Sterlé was a fine jeweler and not-so-fine businessman who began dabbling in perfume in the mid-1950s. Although about a dozen fragrances were issued under the Sterlé name, he only created two himself: Huit-Huit (named for a diamond cut he was fond of using) and Diam’ (three guesses). At the time of its release, Huit-Huit was advertised as the most expensive perfume in the world, running $70 ($678 in today's dollars) for 10ml. Sterlé had formulated the perfume and designed the bottle (a cut crustal flacon incorporating two gold rings) without taking into account all the costs of manufacture, and even at the 2021 equivalent of over $2K/oz., he ended up taking a significant loss. Nominal perfumers from Jean Patou to Clive Christian could relate. Creative bookkeeping could only carry Sterlé so far: by the end of the 1970s, he sold the jewelry company and stayed on as a consultant, and the fragrances were discontinued. Roja Dove, take heed.

Notes from Cleopatra's Boudoir:

Top: fruity note, Japanese camelia
Heart: Bulgarian rose, orris, violet, jasmine
Base: amber, vanilla, honey, spices, musk

Yeah, all that, as far as I can tell, but mostly a dark Bulgarian rose, which I'm guessing is what folks call "jammy." I thought I smelled opulent. My wife thought I smelled like a whorehouse—but an interesting whorehouse. And, really, what other kind would be worth visiting?

View attachment 150260

SOTD: Sterlé - Diam’ (c.1955)

A "floriental" with the following notes from Cleopatra's Boudoir:

Top: neroli, bergamot, lily of the valley, lilac
Heart: orange blossom, rose, jasmine, gardenia, ylang ylang, and heliotrope
Base: benzoin, styrax, sandalwood, ambergris, musk, and vetiver

Another route to jammy rose, similarly sumptuous to Huit-Huit. Pierre Sterlé knew what he liked. My notes from last night state that he composed this himself, which might be a slight exaggeration. In designing his jewelry, Sterlé didn't do his own sketches, but rather described how he wanted things to look and had an assistant do the actual drawing. I'm guessing he dictated to a perfumer in the same way. That's not to say he didn't have a hand (and nose) in it, only that I doubt he composed two fragrances solo without training or experience, and then just stopped.

Anyway, beautiful old-school stuff that smells of money, even if it's hourly.

Thank you very much for your always interesting explanations, and the nice pictures !
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
Re: Your Vintage Scent of the Day (SOTD)

At the rate you're going, the number of bottles you own that can't appear in your wardrobe will soon exceed the number that can.
I'm overdue for submissions to the directory. I suspect poor Judith is swamped.

I'm not really that deep into unlisted frags, though. I've had these minis for a while, and I'm just now getting to them. I'm actually almost done trying everything I have in a bottle, even a tiny one! My "last hurrah" will be my Crown feminines survey. From there, I'll split my days between revisiting frags and trying my samples.
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
Re: Your Vintage Scent of the Day (SOTD)

SOTE:

5039C336-13BF-414C-9B6E-72DF4CDDF5C6.jpg

Dana - Bolero (1932)

Imagine Vol de Nuit reworked as a soft leather, with just a pinch of Habanita. I can’t confirm it yet, but I suspect the perfumer is Jean Carles. Not as good as Emir, but still good enough for me.
 

motorcade

Well-known member
Dec 21, 2020
Re: Your Vintage Scent of the Day (SOTD)

Capucci pour Homme vintage on left hand, current formulation on the right. Yet another case of "minimal difference".
 

Cook.bot

Common Lackey
Basenotes Plus
Jan 6, 2012
Re: Your Vintage Scent of the Day (SOTD)

Dana - Bolero (1932)

Imagine Vol de Nuit reworked as a soft leather, with just a pinch of Habanita. I can’t confirm it yet, but I suspect the perfumer is Jean Carles. Not as good as Emir, but still good enough for me.

What an evocative name! I'll bet the Molinard people were kicking themselves in 1932 for not coming up with that as a followup to Habanita. It would have been perfect.

And how old do you suppose that 'rebellion' ad for Furyo is? You didn't see the word 'parfum' used in reference to men's scents until very recently.
 

Jean-Sté

Well-known member
Jan 1, 2021
Re: Your Vintage Scent of the Day (SOTD)

What an evocative name! I'll bet the Molinard people were kicking themselves in 1932 for not coming up with that as a followup to Habanita. It would have been perfect.

And how old do you suppose that 'rebellion' ad for Furyo is? You didn't see the word 'parfum' used in reference to men's scents until very recently.

It's a "play on words": in French, "un parfum de..." means "it's a kind of..." so "un parfum de seduction" means "a kind of seduction", with in addition the use of the word "parfum". I hope it's clear...
 
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