We Need to Talk About Scalping and Price Gouging

oudaddict

Well-known member
Feb 2, 2017
After the recent (and past) fiascos we have seen with ALD, Slumberhouse, Dixit and Zak, Agar Aura etc. I thought it would be good to discuss the topic of scalping and price gouging in a separate thread. A number of issues have been raised:

In a free capitalist society, is it unethical to scalp an item in order to sell it immediately at a higher price? And does it apply to fragrances?

Why are we seeing this happen and what can be done to avert it in the future?

Should perfume houses take more action against scalpers?

Is it a question of legality, ethics, or simply bad etiquette?
 

Brooks Otterlake

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Feb 12, 2019
Ethics and etiquette are related, given that etiquette is the complex (and fluid) social system by which we communicate respect to our fellow human beings.

I personally find any and all stockpiling for the sake of creating artificial scarcity mildly distasteful at best, loathsome at worst.
 

Varanis Ridari

The Scented Devil
Basenotes Plus
Oct 17, 2012
Scalping will always be a money-making scheme for opportunists with cash to invest in a fast flip, but the artificial scarcity and price fixing happening across all sectors of commercial from medicine and housing to collectibles and electronics like perfume and game consoles is a symptom of the slow failure of our mostly unregulated "laissez-faire" economic system that dispells all notion of morality in the name of profit. In many ways, huge corporations and oligarchs affecting parasitic influence on governments and societies of the world are other symptoms of the same system failing, but I digress.

In other words, there is no right and wrong, just assets and liabilities, with fortune favoring the most cunning, conniving, and selfish profiteer devoid of empathy. Live for the hustle or die by someone else's hustle, as it were. Scaling back down out of the macro worldview and back into the microcosm of our hobby community, scalping, arbitrage, resellers, whatever you want to call them are becoming an increasingly difficult problem to deal with, and many artisanal houses (which ones aren't on board with the scarcity hype like Auphorie), don't have the means to vet and regulate the purchase habits of their own customers to assure fairness.

We are also in times when more "honest" work has grown scarce too with COVID-19 and the economic downturn in many places, so making fast cash by flipping perfumes seems like a good side gig for people needing a few extra hundred or thousand dollars and are willing to take the short term risk investing, especially if they're already fragrance enthusiasts and know which ones to invest in. I'm not condoning it, because to me it feels very exploitative to sit there and coolly take advantage of your fellow fraghead and boldface act like all's fair in love and war, but a bit of desperation makes people look for new ways to get ahead.

I feel like artisanal scalping has become more acute (and lucrative) than arbitrage of discontinued perfumes simply because they're smaller in number, often only see initial distribution from one source, and have built-in demand from smaller and more-dedicated fans (often with deeper pockets). By contrast, hype for discontinued scents must be generated and spread, and can be very hit or miss, plus initial stock can measure in thousands upon thousands of bottles, making it much harder to monopolize supply. It only seems to take a few days to a week to gobble up an artisanal release and dangle it at 3x the price in front of fans.

I honestly don't know what can be done. More regulations means more safety from this exploitation and more stable, guaranteed pricing and availability, but also a ton more red tape, captchas, verifications, and other things that can go wrong. Sellers might need to bite the bullet and create some intermediary merchant system where a neutral third party reviews, accepts, or rejects transactions using heuristics that look for bots or observe past buying habits to stop scalping (some computer parts sites use something like that to stop GPU scalping, but it's hit or miss). The alternative is community boycott, but that hurts the perfumer too because you're feigning disinterest to trick the thieves, but the perfumers don't really know that and might see it as a sign nobody likes their work.

It's a boondoggle for sure.
 

Diamondflame

Frag Bomber 1st Squadron
Basenotes Plus
Jun 28, 2009
Address the scarcity issue at source and the scalpers will loose their teeth.

One way forward for artisan perfumer is to sell a fragrance concept BEFORE actually crafting it in a quantity adequate to meet the pre-orders. In this way the real fans wouldn’t be anguishing over laggy web sales pages, only to miss out on a coveted item and fall at the mercy of unscrupulous scalpers.

Scalpers can still choose to pre-order it at their own risk. Die-hard fans, often the ones willing to pay blood money, would have secured a bottle or 2 by then. Less enamoured fans would be much less willing to pay a scalper’s asking price.
 

Brooks Otterlake

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Feb 12, 2019
Address the scarcity issue at source and the scalpers will loose their teeth.

One way forward for artisan perfumer is to sell a fragrance concept BEFORE actually crafting it in a quantity adequate to meet the pre-orders. In this way the real fans wouldn’t be anguishing over laggy web sales pages, only to miss out on a coveted item and fall at the mercy of unscrupulous scalpers.

Scalpers can still choose to pre-order it at their own risk. Die-hard fans, often the ones willing to pay blood money, would have secured a bottle or 2 by then. Less enamoured fans would be much less willing to pay a scalper’s asking price.
Yes, though I suspect brands have little incentive to cut down on scalper prices, because it helps support their already quite-high valuation of their releases and helps build hype for the next release.

Luxury goods, after all, exist in this sort of "perception loop" in which perceived exclusivity ultimately feeds back into and sustains the brand's cachet.
 

Danny Mitchell

Well-known member
Mar 21, 2019
This thread reminds me of dudes who go to baseball games when they're giving away bobbleheads. They buy 30 tickets and go through the gates 30 times, fill up several shopping bags full of bobbleheads. Thanks, jerks, I guess my kids won't be getting a bobblehead today, and we drove an hour and a half.

I suppose to happens in the fragrance world but the production is so enormous at most houses, there's still plenty to go around. Even after discontinuations.
 

zerofox

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Aug 31, 2020
You’d have to go upstream by forming a purchasing bloc to pre-order. I’m surprised an established network like BN hasn’t done so already. Co-ops don’t need to be formal.
 

Swoleiosis

Well-known member
Jan 10, 2020
Is it a question of legality, ethics, or simply bad etiquette?

the slow failure of our mostly unregulated "laissez-faire" economic system that dispells all notion of morality in the name of profit. In many ways, huge corporations and oligarchs affecting parasitic influence on governments and societies of the world are other symptoms of the same system failing, but I digress.

Yes, inevitably this will turn into a discussion of capitalism since we have to buy luxuries with the same currency we do housing, medical care, food, education, etc. competing against those who are saving 10 - 300x the average yearly income and compounding their existing wealth. Plus that discussion is almost impossible with so much propaganda equating profit to freedom to morality, and so on. So the constructive conversation is....

You’d have to go upstream by forming a purchasing bloc to pre-order. I’m surprised an established network like BN hasn’t done so already. Co-ops don’t need to be formal.

I was trying to say something like this in the Areej thread. I don't know how much of the artists' sales / hype / promotion / following comes from BN, but if it is significant, I feel like we would be able to have them set aside at least 10 or so bottles for BN'ers to purchase. Youtubers, bloggers, others, get free bottles; I'd think they would be okay with letting the devoted fans, who review, hype, and point others in their direction, pay for some. It would take some organizing on our part, but nothing too complex or time-consuming I'm sure.
 

MrPod

Well-known member
Jan 10, 2018
I was trying to say something like this in the Areej thread. I don't know how much of the artists' sales / hype / promotion / following comes from BN, but if it is significant, I feel like we would be able to have them set aside at least 10 or so bottles for BN'ers to purchase. Youtubers, bloggers, others, get free bottles; I'd think they would be okay with letting the devoted fans, who review, hype, and point others in their direction, pay for some. It would take some organizing on our part, but nothing too complex or time-consuming I'm sure.

But how do you decide who the 'devoted fans' are?

Areej is already doing this in a way by letting people pre-order full sets. That seems a reasonable way to let fans by-pass the scrum of the launch day.
 

Swoleiosis

Well-known member
Jan 10, 2020
But how do you decide who the 'devoted fans' are?

Areej is already doing this in a way by letting people pre-order full sets. That seems a reasonable way to let fans by-pass the scrum of the launch day.

Most can't spend 1.2k, nor do we want to encourage them selling the unwanted bottles for a high price, which will be irresistible to most, as people need money.
Well, it would have to be self-regulated. Some poster that knows the other posters, and can decide to give x to someone who will decant, and then either do a lottery, or know who long time members are. Or maybe we won't even need to do that, and there will be 15 people ordering 1-2 bottles each, ready to pay right now, and the artist will be okay with the request. I'd join basenotes plus if we had the group on the private boards; that could be a way to keep it secret for a while from outside scalpers, plus help BN.
 

MrPod

Well-known member
Jan 10, 2018
Clearly there were enough people who were willing to spend 1.2k for the pre-sale to sell out. Apart from 10 or so SG bottles, there are none of the other perfumes being offered at high prices. I've seen quite a few unwanted bottles at cost prices.

There's nothing to stop people getting together to buy full sets at the pre-sale and dividing them up.
 

JJ The Terrible

Well-known member
Mar 2, 2020
Something is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it. Where are the lines between "ethics" of the seller and "frugality" of the purchaser? Free Market, Free Will.....welcome to planet disco baby!!!
 

Wingie

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Dec 2, 2009
It stinks, but it's also not like this is a new practice - it has been going on in the event industry for years, and has happened with many limited edition products, such as Nintendo's re-release of the SNES a couple years ago. A lot of strategies employed have been very labour intensive, even for multi-million dollar industries like the music industry, with limited results. Preventing price-gouging of goods such as perfume is arguably even more challenging as you can't put measures in place upon arrival like you can for events, and it seems to be actual individuals purchasing the bottles, rather than automated bots. So small artisanal perfumers like Russian Adam may not have the means, or may not be willing or able to invest the needed resources to combat price-gouging, especially if the investment is not going to ultimately prevent it - which is unfortunately what experiences in other industries seems to suggest.
 

Hugh V.

Well-known member
Dec 9, 2016
After the recent (and past) fiascos we have seen with ALD, Slumberhouse, Dixit and Zak, Agar Aura etc. I thought it would be good to discuss the topic of scalping and price gouging in a separate thread. A number of issues have been raised:

In a free capitalist society, is it unethical to scalp an item in order to sell it immediately at a higher price? And does it apply to fragrances?

Why are we seeing this happen and what can be done to avert it in the future?

Should perfume houses take more action against scalpers?

Is it a question of legality, ethics, or simply bad etiquette?


I have no knowledge of ALD, Slumberhouse, Dixit and the rest. I'll have to look into that later.

I'm only familiar with the practice of scalping within the grey market. A fragrance is announced as discontinued, and the online prices start shooting up until stock is gone. Then you find once $40 fragrances going for over $100. I'm looking up VC&A Tsar right now on eBay and I see one listing has the "BUY IT NOW" option at $240, and it's for the last reformulation. Really? I can see the appeal of the scent itself, but the quality of the reformulation does not seem that great. It smells in accordance with the original price tag of $20-30. I plan on getting rid of my bottle down the road. I'm tempted to see if I can get it for some ridiculous amount. That's good for me, right? But I'd feel kind of bad about it. I'd rather just get back what I paid for it at the mall ($55).

It seemed like scalping was something only those in the know would get involved in. I have a nephew who's in middle school, and he was telling me that he wanted to buy something, NES Classic/Jordans/something. But he admitted, he didn't even like the particular item, but he wanted to get it so he could in turn sell it on eBay for a much higher price. Now my nephew lives in a middle class home, has the latest designer fashions, lates video game consoles, etc. I'd go as far as to say he's spoiled. So why would a kid like him want to buy something, to make, roughly, a potential $200 profit when he's already spoiled and pampered?

It's almost fashionable in a way for even rich kids to "flip" stuff on eBay.
 

Xcaliber6685

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Sep 18, 2020
I heard from somewhere that some of these elixirs are being flipped bigly like you have never seen, is because they are able to extend your lifespan ten fold if you wear them regularily. I don't know, maybe, that's what I heard, everybody’s talking about it. There are many low energy juices out there, let’s face it. We don’t need low energy juice. We need lots of energy!
 

FragSyndrome

Well-known member
Sep 14, 2016
I heard from somewhere that some of these elixirs are being flipped bigly like you have never seen, is because they are able to extend your lifespan ten fold if you wear them regularily. I don't know, maybe, that's what I heard, everybody’s talking about it. There are many low energy juices out there, let’s face it. We don’t need low energy juice. We need lots of energy!

Bro... pass the L ;)
 

LiveJazz

Funky fresh
Basenotes Plus
Mar 16, 2006
There were some interesting thoughts on this topic in this thread:
https://www.basenotes.net/threads/479023-Battling-Price-Gouging

My basic take is that the best way to battle scalping is to boycott scalpers. Buy what the scalpers aren't scalping. The world of fragrance is large.

Besides, waiting for midnight artisan release drops and battling the subsequent scalping mayhem just...isn't fun. Even if the scent is good, I'd rather avoid the stress and hassle, and have no problem just stepping back from that whole scene.

Also, if you're just in it for the pretty smells, strifeknot. :thumbup:
 

Castingshadows

Well-known member
Apr 14, 2020
There were some interesting thoughts on this topic in this thread:
https://www.basenotes.net/threads/479023-Battling-Price-Gouging

My basic take is that the best way to battle scalping is to boycott scalpers. Buy what the scalpers aren't scalping. The world of fragrance is large.

Besides, waiting for midnight artisan release drops and battling the subsequent scalping mayhem just...isn't fun. Even if the scent is good, I'd rather avoid the stress and hassle, and have no problem just stepping back from that whole scene.

Also, if you're just in it for the pretty smells, strifeknot. :thumbup:

I think the people paying a grand for bottles don’t really care about the price. Our community can boycott scalpers all we want but there’s still going to be people with deep pockets out there who don’t mind paying a ton of cash for something.

If we really want to combat scalping then we would also have to do our part to limit ourselves to just one bottle per customer. I’ve seen so many people in the ALD thread complaining about scalpers yet they buy 2 or three backup bottles of super limited compositions and then act like they didn’t have a part in driving up the scarcity. There’s really no good way to get around this outside of just doing our part to make sure we buy what we want.
 

PrinceRF

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 3, 2020
My basic take is that the best way to battle scalping is to boycott scalpers. Buy what the scalpers aren't scalping. The world of fragrance is large.

I like the idea, but I don't think it will work realistically. If someone wants it enough, they will pay what they are willing to pay.
 

LiveJazz

Funky fresh
Basenotes Plus
Mar 16, 2006
I like the idea, but I don't think it will work realistically. If someone wants it enough, they will pay what they are willing to pay.

Right, there's no way to enforce it. It's an individual decision, and there will always be some buyers willing to play this game...but if enough people adopt this mindset, it will make an incremental difference and reduce the economic incentive to scalp. Baby steps.

And if not enough people get on board to make any difference...oh well, I'm still happy with my sniffing and happy not to be taken advantage of.
 

oudaddict

Well-known member
Feb 2, 2017
If we really want to combat scalping then we would also have to do our part to limit ourselves to just one bottle per customer. I’ve seen so many people in the ALD thread complaining about scalpers yet they buy 2 or three backup bottles of super limited compositions and then act like they didn’t have a part in driving up the scarcity. There’s really no good way to get around this outside of just doing our part to make sure we buy what we want.

Good point. Edit: "make sure we buy what we will use"
 

Shlorpy

Well-known member
Apr 12, 2019
ALD, Slumberhouse, Dixit and Zak, Agar Aura etc.

It's always interesting when I come across a list of items with which I have zero familiarity.

Ok, I researched the above...

Here's the thing about price gouging. It's almost always used in the context of necessities. The stuff you need to stay alive in an emergency. Water, food, energy, first-aid supplies, stuff like that. There's no such thing as "price-gouging" luxury goods, and I think fragrances would fall into that category except for maybe basic deodorant.

So this whole concept is a bit silly to me. First world problems!

As far as scalping goes, who cares? The only reason professional sports cares about that is because they want to control the market and they don't want empty seats. If scalpers, who provide a secondary market, couldn't price their second-hand wares correctly, they'd end up with a bunch of tickets that didn't move butts into seats in the stadium and the crowd would look meager. Professional sports wants TV viewers to think that the sport is super popular and that would look bad.

Fragrances.. eh. If the price is too high, don't buy it. Producers should care because scalpers could limit the exposure of their fragrance but other than that... find another niche fragrance? There's a million of them.
 

PEARL

Well-known member
Jun 30, 2011
In a free capitalist society, is it unethical to scalp an item in order to sell it immediately at a higher price? And does it apply to fragrances?
Is it a question of legality, ethics, or simply bad etiquette?
If it is a question about the ethics, morals, legality, and etiquette of buying and reselling luxury items for profit and it leads one to say that it is unethical, immoral, or bad etiquette, then that one's ethical and moral compass is skewed. What I'm hearing in total is, "I have 20 bottles, I sold two for profit because I fell out of love with them and that was market price but on the last limited release of ABC from XYZ I was unable to get any because somebody else bought them all to resell at a mark-up. I deserved one because I would have truly enjoyed it as a real enthusiast/collector/consumer of said luxury item." IMO is says less about the spirit of capitalism and more about the spirit of gross consumerism, hypocrisy, privilege, sense of entitlement, and the false equivalency of ascribing moral and ethical implications on the distribution of necessities to that which is not a necessity.

If ALD tried something to ensure fans or loyal customers get their product, that's Adam being Adam, but to say that it is vendor responsibility to ensure that all customers get product echoes the same privileged sense of entitlement. The only way for a vendor to ensure all 500 consumers get product when there's only 100, equitably, is for all 500 consumers to get none.

Legally, auction sites such as eBay, iOffer, DealDash, Sotheby's, etc. offer sellers a platform to "legally scalp" and sell goods at a profit, sometimes exorbitantly. Legally, the primary difference in "legal scalping" and illegal scalping, laws which vary by state, is that with "legal scalping" applicable state and local sales tax are placed on the sale. IMO it's illegal in some jurisdictions not to protect the consumer but to protect that jurisdiction's monetary interest in one's private sale. They used to throw tea overboard for stuff like that.
 

Xcaliber6685

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Sep 18, 2020
Just in case some of you want to show some love and support to the scalpers, there's an ALD Baikal Gris going for $399, Oud Luwak and Antiquity selling for $550 as we speak, and Walimah for $795 right now. LOL I've got to say, at least they're pretty consistent in keeping them priced at a certain range.
 

FragSyndrome

Well-known member
Sep 14, 2016
Just in case some of you want to show some love and support to the scalpers, there's an ALD Baikal Gris going for $399, Oud Luwak and Antiquity selling for $550 as we speak, and Walimah for $795 right now. LOL I've got to say, at least they're pretty consistent in keeping them priced at a certain range.

That’s not scalping. Those are individuals selling their bottles for whatever price they like. There’s not a single thing wrong with it.
 

Alonewithcologne

Well-known member
Oct 12, 2017
Such behavior raises prices in the short term, and somewhat lowers them in the midterm. It can increase availability in the midterm, at the expense of relative short-term availability. Overall, the costs to the ultimate consumers of the products are more with scalpers in the market, but not so much as you think, as in the midterm, prices from consumer sold bottles would be higher without scalpers, since they would be more scarce. Of course, the scalpers themselves derive some benefit. As a problem catallactics, scalping and gouging simply changes when and who receives benefits from trade of a scarce luxury good (fragrance).

It's not particularly moral or immoral behavior, but it's easy to see why people get upset with it. You should, however, think about the benefits of this behavior, even though they're not obvious. It's like the U.S. toilet paper shortages earlier this year: it's hard to deny that those who ran out of toilet paper during that time would have greatly benefited from price gouging. There are pros and cons.

Consumers who hoard during scarcity out of fear, and companies who create artificial scarcity on purpose (the Tickle Me Elmo phenomenon), are honestly a bigger real problem.
 

FragSyndrome

Well-known member
Sep 14, 2016
Deleted

Changed my mind on this post. It’s “not my problem”. It’s not like I’m going to change these peoples opinions or stop them from vilifying and slandering fragrance collectors that sell their fragrance at whatever price they like on the free market.
 

Swoleiosis

Well-known member
Jan 10, 2020
Those are individuals selling their bottles for whatever price they like. There’s not a single thing wrong with it.

It’s a free market. People have the right to sell their belongings for whatever price they chose.
I’m sick of private collectors being vilified for selling their collectibles at the price they chose.

I’m absolutely sick of these entitled people having the audacity to slander others and call them derogatory names for selling their collectibles in the free market.

And don’t twist my words (people on this thread). Ive heard all your entitled perspectives - mine is written above. Deal with it.
Why be in this thread if you don't think reselling for profit is an issue? Because you want to win people over to your point of view because you dislike the "slander" or whatever people send your way or your perceived way because you resell things for a profit and take offense to the general discussion. So we have to "deal with it" and you can try to talk down to opinions of behaviors that have negative effects on the hobby? I'm replying because you called this thread entitled and audacious and regularly misuse economic terminology and equate market transactions with morality and have nothing to add except "I can do what I want."

Buying to resell / scalp decreases the supply available to the rest of us, drives up the prices in the secondary market due to the supply reduction plus monopolistic pricing capturing the few consumers willing to pay some maximum price, literally increases the costs of swapping and sharing because of the huge potential profits that must be knowingly foregone. Now if you think depriving people of a luxury can't be immoral, fine, that's an argument. But it certainly does makes things sucky and worse for a lot of people, and prices out a bunch that used to be able to save up for something eventually, or sample then buy with stuff still in stock. Once again, totally different than selling your collection for a modest profit. What's the difference? Time since release...% of markup... intent... personal need... like all social interactions and judgements, it depends.

All of that has been talked about over and over though, the only thing left is what to do about it. Others have mentioned going directly to the perfumer, supporting decanters, and just avoiding scalpers / price increases. Openly saying "damn I hate scalpers," while having zero actual effect on anybody is so annoying to some people that we had to be moved to another thread and it STILL bothers them enough to have to come here and complain about us complaining.
 

FragSyndrome

Well-known member
Sep 14, 2016
Why be in this thread if you don't think reselling for profit is an issue? Because you want to win people over to your point of view because you dislike the "slander" or whatever people send your way or your perceived way because you resell things for a profit and take offense to the general discussion. So we have to "deal with it" and you can try to talk down to opinions of behaviors that have negative effects on the hobby? I'm replying because you called this thread entitled and audacious and regularly misuse economic terminology and equate market transactions with morality and have nothing to add except "I can do what I want."

Buying to resell / scalp decreases the supply available to the rest of us, drives up the prices in the secondary market due to the supply reduction plus monopolistic pricing capturing the few consumers willing to pay some maximum price, literally increases the costs of swapping and sharing because of the huge potential profits that must be knowingly foregone. Now if you think depriving people of a luxury can't be immoral, fine, that's an argument. But it certainly does makes things sucky and worse for a lot of people, and prices out a bunch that used to be able to save up for something eventually, or sample then buy with stuff still in stock. Once again, totally different than selling your collection for a modest profit. What's the difference? Time since release...% of markup... intent... personal need... like all social interactions and judgements, it depends.

All of that has been talked about over and over though, the only thing left is what to do about it. Others have mentioned going directly to the perfumer, supporting decanters, and just avoiding scalpers / price increases. Openly saying "damn I hate scalpers," while having zero actual effect on anybody is so annoying to some people that we had to be moved to another thread and it STILL bothers them enough to have to come here and complain about us complaining.

You have no idea who’s buying to resell and who’s not. None the less, you’re throwing everyone who sells a fragrance over msrp into the scalpers category. You’re vilifying and slandering private collectors and valued members of the basenotes community with your broad strokes.
 

Swoleiosis

Well-known member
Jan 10, 2020
You have no idea who’s buying to resell and who’s not. None the less, you’re throwing everyone who sells a fragrance over msrp into the scalpers category. You’re vilifying and slandering private collectors and valued members of the basenotes community with your broad strokes.

I explicitly said I am not; middle paragraph.
 

Varanis Ridari

The Scented Devil
Basenotes Plus
Oct 17, 2012
I agree that it's nigh impossible to tell who's offloading their regretted purchases or surplus stock for a profit from those with intent to game the system by exploiting the limited nature of collectable goods, so I'm very very VERY careful not to indict anyone as doing the latter versus the former.

Nobody here should ever feel "called out" when I remark disdainfully on scalping unless they full-stop admit to it up front. Even then, the worst I'd do is say that they're never getting my money, and I'd also probably give them a hard time within code of conduct limits.

This thread is about brainstorming solutions to a problem, not making anyone wear "the Scarlet Letter" for perceived unscrupulous behavior. If you think nothing is wrong with the way things are, that's respectfully noted, but you have nothing to add in this conversation.

That said, I also tend to look kinder on this sort of thing if I know this is how someone is getting by. Look at the world outside, with COVID-19, rampant unemployment, homelessness, ever-widening wealth gaps. If flipping smelly water gives you financial security, who's to judge you?
 

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