PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
They were charging for samples even back then.

Might’ve just been postage and (as per the picture) handling.

Also worth noting that no one remembers Luyties now.* That’s what you get for charging for samples!

*Not quite true. The Luyties family continues to operate one of the world’s largest homeopathic pharmacies—which is to say, scams—and a fascinating (and scandalous!) accounting of the life and events that led to Frivole can be found here:


As a perfume, Frivole was a one-off flop, but the Lalique bottle has value to collectors. And despite that bottle and the “Paris - New York” thing, the perfume was made in St. Louis by the Sanitol company, whose principle product was tooth powder.
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
I recently came across this one that seems very peculiar to me for a Chanel advert. Maybe because Chanel ads usually stress independence in the women they present.

I’m not even sure what that ad’s supposed to mean. You’re ready for him to buy you Chanel?
 

grayspoole

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Feb 4, 2014
I’m not even sure what that ad’s supposed to mean. You’re ready for him to buy you Chanel?

I take it to mean that the main "problem" he can solve for her is by filling that man-sized hole in her life.

I am also struggling to interpret the ad. It seems to be saying that you are “ready for Chanel” when you are ready for commitment. So Chanel is not meant for flibbertigibbets?

Judging by the clothes and makeup, this seems to be a late 1950’s ad.
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
Turns out there were a great many of these “You’re ready for Chanel” ads. They were the brainchild of Kitty D’Alessio, then fashion director for ad agency Norman, Craig & Kummel. In response to analysis in the early 1960s that Chanel’s average customer was too old for the company’s future, she conceived this pitch for magazines like Seventeen. The idea was to get young women excited about graduating to Chanel, as if it were a rite of passage to womanhood.

It must’ve been effective. By 1980, D’Alessio was president of Chanel’s American operations, and she lays claim to the idea to hire Karl Lagerfeld, making it work by offering him couture and allowing him to continue his associations with other houses.

So, kind of an icky campaign, but I think I have to let it slide.
 

grayspoole

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Feb 4, 2014
Turns out there were a great many of these “You’re ready for Chanel” ads. They were the brainchild of Kitty D’Alessio, then fashion director for ad agency Norman, Craig & Kummel. In response to analysis in the early 1960s that Chanel’s average customer was too old for the company’s future, she conceived this pitch for magazines like Seventeen. The idea was to get young women excited about graduating to Chanel, as if it were a rite of passage to womanhood.

It must’ve been effective. By 1980, D’Alessio was president of Chanel’s American operations, and she lays claim to the idea to hire Karl Lagerfeld, making it work by offering him couture and allowing him to continue his associations with other houses.

So, kind of an icky campaign, but I think I have to let it slide.

Interesting info! “Rite of passage to womanhood”…got it.

As I look at the ad again, I see that these people are prematurely aged students who are sitting in numbered chairs in a classroom holding books and pens. And I guess it must be a math class, so the tagline “solves all of your problems” (take note of the underlined word) must mean that he helps you with math (because you’re a girl and you can’t do your problem sets on your own) and, oh, so much more.

Makes me want to crack a perfume bottle on someone’s head, but there are definitely ickier ads from the time period.
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
As I look at the ad again, I see that these people are prematurely aged students who are sitting in numbered chairs in a classroom holding books and pens. And I guess it must be a math class, so the tagline “solves all of your problems” (take note of the underlined word) must mean that he helps you with math (because you’re a girl and you can’t do your problem sets on your own) and, oh, so much more.

Makes me want to crack a perfume bottle on someone’s head, but there are definitely ickier ads from the time period.

Yep. The entire series ties romance to readiness, as if finding your first serious guy is integral to achieving “Chanel maturity.” At a certain level, you could say it’s equating becoming a Chanel customer with losing your virginity, but at least it doesn’t have the obtuse innuendo of 1970s ads.
 

Hugh V.

Basenotes Dependent
Dec 9, 2016
That is crazy how in the Chanel ad she looks like she could be from any area, 80s/90s especially, but he's straight up looks like the Beaver's brother.

I don't find the ad that offensive though. It looks almost like it could be a college classroom, and she has the appearance of someone studious and intelligent. Is it not common for students to help each other with studying, homework, or assignments? I can't recall how many sitcoms I saw where the "cool" teen male heart throb was getting help studying from a female classmate. And "girl problems" and "boy problems" have been a thing for quite a while.
 

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