Ungaro pour L'Homme III. Dihydromyrcenol? | Basenotes

Ungaro pour L'Homme III. Dihydromyrcenol?

Emanuel76

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2018
Does anyone know if the first version of Ungaro pour L'Homme III (Made in France) contains dihydromyrcenol?
Thank you!


ungaro-iii-l-homme-vintage.jpg
 

RCavs

Well-known member
Sep 13, 2004
Emanuel76, Do you own it? I'm particularly interested in reading what you think about the differences between the first version versus made in Italy ones! :smiley:
What is puzzling me is that I own a bottle Made in Italy (red box, red cap) that smells more woody, darker and even sweeter than another 2 bottles also "Made in Italy" that I own (red boxes, but black caps). These 2 bottles are very close to another one "Made in Italy" bottle I own (black box, black cap), in fact, I can't detect any significant difference between them.
 

Emanuel76

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2018
:grin: :grin: :grin: :grin: :grin:
Well, be careful, There's a vodka note in it, probably a fantasy note obtained with dihidromircenol's help? :rolleyesold:
OMFG! So there is a vodka accord in the vintage version too?
I was hoping it would only be present in the current version. :cry:
 

Varanis Ridari

The Scented Devil
Basenotes Plus
Oct 17, 2012
A bit of a long slog, so please bear with me.

Dihydromyrcenol goes all the way back to the 70's and it's first notable uses in the men's market are both Paco Rabanne pour Homme (1973), and Azzaro pour Homme (1978). Even in day-one launch bottles, both of those fragrances have some (along with Dimetol - another "clean" citrus booster just like Dihydromyrcenol), although the dosage is small compared to Drakkar Noir (1984), Duc de Vervins (1985), and Xeryus (1987), all of which are much soapier.

Stuff like Green Irish Tweed (1985) and Cool Water (1988) is where the dosage gets high enough to really notice it stand out (again, even in deep vintages), and although my deep vintage carded samples of Ungaro I and II don't really have it, Ungaro III definitely does. As noted by others, the Dihydromyrcenol helps the "vodka" accord come through, but in older bottles the base is a bit richer to balance the two. Ungaro III in any format is still a primarily fresh scent though, the freshest of the 3 pour L'Homme releases.

Hopefully that clears up some things. In small doses, the stuff is kinda good and gives the "Irish Spring" effect (eg. Worth ph, R&G L'Homme, Patrick), in larger doses, it gets to smell like the leftover film on bath water after taking a bubblebath (which may still be good to some people), and in even higher doses, gets metallic and nasty. There's something else besides the Dihydromyrcenol also making up that "vodka" accord in the opening, but I don't know what it is, although I know it's also in my red-label deep vintage carded sample too.

Hope this helps.
 
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RCavs

Well-known member
Sep 13, 2004
A bit of a long slog, so please bear with me.

Dihydromyrcenol goes all the way back to the 70's and it's first notable uses in the men's market are both Paco Rabanne pour Homme (1973), and Azzaro pour Homme (1978). Even in day-one launch bottles, both of those fragrances have some (along with Dimetol - another "clean" citrus booster just like Dihydromyrcenol), although the dosage is small compared to Drakkar Noir (1984), Duc de Vervins (1985), and Xeryus (1987), all of which are much soapier.

Stuff like Green Irish Tweed (1985) and Cool Water (1988) is where the dosage gets high enough to really notice it stand out (again, even in deep vintages), and although my deep vintage carded samples of Ungaro I and II don't really have it, Ungaro III definitely does. As noted by others, the Dihydromyrcenol helps the "vodka" accord come through, but in older bottles the base is a bit richer to balance the two. Ungaro III in any format is still a primarily fresh scent though, the freshest of the 3 pour L'Homme releases.

Hopefully that clears up some things. In small doses, the stuff is kinda good and gives the "Irish Spring" effect (eg. Worth ph, R&G L'Homme, Patrick), in larger doses, it gets to smell like the leftover film on bath water after taking a bubblebath (which may still be good to some people), and in even higher doses, gets metallic and nasty. There's something else besides the Dihydromyrcenol also making up that "vodka" accord in the opening, but I don't know what it is, although I know it's also in my red-label deep vintage carded sample too.

Hope this helps.

Nice text, Varanis! Cleared things up for me. :thumbsup:
 

Emanuel76

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2018
A bit of a long slog, so please bear with me.

Dihydromyrcenol goes all the way back to the 70's and it's first notable uses in the men's market are both Paco Rabanne pour Homme (1973), and Azzaro pour Homme (1978). Even in day-one launch bottles, both of those fragrances have some (along with Dimetol - another "clean" citrus booster just like Dihydromyrcenol), although the dosage is small compared to Drakkar Noir (1984), Duc de Vervins (1985), and Xeryus (1987), all of which are much soapier.

Stuff like Green Irish Tweed (1985) and Cool Water (1988) is where the dosage gets high enough to really notice it stand out (again, even in deep vintages), and although my deep vintage carded samples of Ungaro I and II don't really have it, Ungaro III definitely does. As noted by others, the Dihydromyrcenol helps the "vodka" accord come through, but in older bottles the base is a bit richer to balance the two. Ungaro III in any format is still a primarily fresh scent though, the freshest of the 3 pour L'Homme releases.

Hopefully that clears up some things. In small doses, the stuff is kinda good and gives the "Irish Spring" effect (eg. Worth ph, R&G L'Homme, Patrick), in larger doses, it gets to smell like the leftover film on bath water after taking a bubblebath (which may still be good to some people), and in even higher doses, gets metallic and nasty. There's something else besides the Dihydromyrcenol also making up that "vodka" accord in the opening, but I don't know what it is, although I know it's also in my red-label deep vintage carded sample too.

Hope this helps.
So, it becomes metallic only when used in large quantities.
If there is Dihydromyrcenol in the vintage Azzaro pour Homme, it clearly means that when used in small amount it's not vile. I love Azzaro pour Homme.

I perceive the vodka accord from the recent version of Ungaro III as piercing metallic. I don't like it at all.


Of course it helps. Thank you for the clarification!

There's something else besides the Dihydromyrcenol also making up that "vodka" accord in the opening, but I don't know what it is, although I know it's also in my red-label deep vintage carded sample too.
My bet is on Calone. I don't really detected it, but I know its airiness.
I also know that it works pretty well in small amounts when paired with flowers - it lifts the flowers.
I find that breezy rose rather interesting.

I should smell it again. Maybe now I can better tell if the Calone is present. Now I can easily detect it.
Last time I wore it 3 years ago. I throw away the bottle, but I'm sure I still have a sample somewhere.

Yes it does but not as bad as GIT and Cool Water. It is tolerable. Probably as much as Duc de Vervins.

For me, Vodka is more noticeable in most recent versions. Keep in mind my oldest botttle is Made in Italy, red box, red cap, but I detect vodka in It too.
Good to know.
Thank you!
 
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