Uh oh.. Massive fragrance changes in 2021/2022. (opoponax, jasmine, ylang ylang)..

ILikePeeps

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
May 15, 2012
Apparently straight from Sarah McCartney of 4160 Tuesdays.

"You probably need to know this, scent friends. The long awaited IFRA 49th Amendment is out in January, but as I'm a member I've seen it, and read the 39 page summary. There's the technical data still to go through so we can recalculate everything we need to get our safety certificates,
We've been waiting for several years to find out what the result all thousands of safety tests have been, and it's going to be interesting.
There are new cosmetics regulations from the EU (and these will apply everywhere, for all international companies, including ours, not just the EU). These take into account that people might use a shower gel, then a cream and then a perfume, all of which have safety limits, that that piled on top of each other, they break them.
This cumulation of irritants in essential oils and the occasional synthetic is the reason that people sometimes spray on a perfume and think that the perfume makes their skin sting, while it could be that it was their shower gel that was close to the limit, and the perfume just pushed it over the top.

Anyway, what does it mean for us? All new fragrances released must comply by new regulations by 10th February 2021, and perfumers have until February 2022 to reformulate all the current ones. The biggest hit for me that that my beloved opoponax is now named on the allergen list, along with jasmine and ylang ylang. The good news is that mandarin essential oil has been found not to be photo toxic.

Over the next couple of years you will see a lot of discontinuations, and those which aren't discontinued will be reformulated. You'll find that most perfume sales people will still deny that this is happening, because it is terrifically complex, so they find it easier as an industry, particularly in the UK where sales training is mostly based on flim-flam, flattery and froth. (Except when Olfiction are doing it.)

This, combined with suppliers from EU27 countries quietly but definitively withdrawing their UK representation, is going to make the UK indie fragrance industry a tricky place to be. That's one reason why I've been putting our Scenthusiasm workshops online, and intend to share my knowledge as well as our perfumes. I probably have about three years - I can still sell through the stock I have in place when the deadlines hit - to be able to sell the perfumes we have at the moment. If the formulas change then I'll publish them so you can still make your own.
After all, it's illegal for Ribena to sell their own formula with ALL the sugar in it now, put you're allowed to pick blackcurrants, buy a bag or demarara and make your own. For the 999 out of 1000 people who aren't affected by perfumery materials, there will still be a way.

If you see nothing about this from any other perfume house, don't be surprised. They're hoping no one will notice. Besides they have huge creative teams and resources to work on these things; they've already started. Here, not so much.

If you ever felt guilty about stockpiling your 4160Tuesdays favourites, don't. You might be needing them. I'm already stockpiling my own creations to get me through my retirement. This year I shall be working on reformulations, and I'll be as accurate as I can, but not everything will survive.

I might just have to embrace it and be more creative with the new ones. I thought it best to let you plan ahead though."
 

SydnorIII

Well-known member
Jan 5, 2017
Yeah, this isn’t going to stop. As far as perfume is concerned, I don’t buy anything anymore that’s subject to IFRA/EU regulation.


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cazaubon

Moderator
Moderator
Basenotes Plus
Jan 1, 2005
Very bad news. I have contacted my favourite indie perfumers to find out what to stockpile. I wish they would do labeling requirements rather than ingredient restrictions/bans. Meanwhile, cigarettes, alcohol, peanuts, etc. that actually kill people are still freely sold around the world. Madness.
 

Nastka

Well-known member
Mar 6, 2011
This layering nonsense (shower gel / cream and perfume) is probably the most idiotic thing I've heard so far. Where is this going to stop, especially that every single cosmetic may be applied in different amounts? Why not just ban everything outright? Hope I won't give anyone stupid ideas here...

Put a warning label on it already and be done with it.
 

cazaubon

Moderator
Moderator
Basenotes Plus
Jan 1, 2005
Just heard from Liz Moores of Papillon Perfumery, she said she planned ahead for further restrictions and none of her scents at this point will need to be reformulated. Will post updates when I hear back from Hiram Green and Andy Tauer, who I also contacted.
 

Zilpha

Well-known member
Aug 7, 2008
I wish they would do labeling requirements rather than ingredient restrictions/bans. Meanwhile, cigarettes, alcohol, peanuts, etc. that actually kill people are still freely sold around the world. Madness.

The irony of this kills me.
 

slpfrsly

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 1, 2019
If layering is the problem, then good grief. Place the restrictions on the ancillary products or just stop making them. Leave the perfumes alone.

I think it's the (generally quite reasonable) position that far more people use shower gels and soaps - an essential for hygiene - than perfume, which is not.

This is one thing which, although disappointing, I can understand and accept. I'm not outright allergic to anything in perfumes, but I'm definitely sensitive, and many vintage fragrances almost always make me sneeze, give me a headache, and/or cause my nose to block. Sooo...I'm glad that the changes made in the last 30 years have meant that very few fragrances now do this, and it's only overspraying or the odd unlucky scent that tends to provoke that reaction in me.

To then take that experience and transpose it on to someone who literally IS allergic and/or more sensitive to more elements used in perfumery, where contact with their skin could cause significant issues...it's a small sacrifice worth paying. There are more options for perfume than ever before - and while you can bemoan 'things ain't what they used to be', I just cannot fathom this being a major issue. Synthetics can be great. Perfumers will adapt.

I wrote in my review of Dior's Eau Sauvage EDP that I wonder whether the 2017 reformulation was allergen based, as the 2012 version reacted with me. Ultimately, the world is a better place for the vast, vast majority of people with these rules. Red tape or not. There is a tiny minority of people on these sites who actually "need" vintages or certain ingredients, and I would suggest that need is more emotional and/or hobbyist than anything else...which, again, there are bigger fish to fry, in my view.
 

GoldWineMemories

Well-known member
Nov 22, 2019
I think it's the (generally quite reasonable) position that far more people use shower gels and soaps - an essential for hygiene - than perfume, which is not.

This is one thing which, although disappointing, I can understand and accept. I'm not outright allergic to anything in perfumes, but I'm definitely sensitive, and many vintage fragrances almost always make me sneeze, give me a headache, and/or cause my nose to block. Sooo...I'm glad that the changes made in the last 30 years have meant that very few fragrances now do this, and it's only overspraying or the odd unlucky scent that tends to provoke that reaction in me.

To then take that experience and transpose it on to someone who literally IS allergic and/or more sensitive to more elements used in perfumery, where contact with their skin could cause significant issues...it's a small sacrifice worth paying. There are more options for perfume than ever before - and while you can bemoan 'things ain't what they used to be', I just cannot fathom this being a major issue. Synthetics can be great. Perfumers will adapt.

I wrote in my review of Dior's Eau Sauvage EDP that I wonder whether the 2017 reformulation was allergen based, as the 2012 version reacted with me. Ultimately, the world is a better place for the vast, vast majority of people with these rules. Red tape or not. There is a tiny minority of people on these sites who actually "need" vintages or certain ingredients, and I would suggest that need is more emotional and/or hobbyist than anything else...which, again, there are bigger fish to fry, in my view.

No it is not a small price worth paying. If you're allergic to something, then that does not mean no one else in the world gets to enjoy it anymore. It would be akin to banning peanut butter.
 

ultravisitor

Well-known member
Nov 4, 2014
No it is not a small price worth paying. If you're allergic to something, then that does not mean no one else in the world gets to enjoy it anymore. It would be akin to banning peanut butter.

The funny thing about peanut butter, though, is that a reason why so many kids developed allergies to peanuts is because parents weren't feeding them to their kids, so they weren't able to develop the proper antibodies for them. Parents were overprotecting their kids.
 

Redneck Perfumisto

League of Cycloöctadiene Isomer Aestheticists
Basenotes Plus
Feb 27, 2008
The funny thing about peanut butter, though, is that a reason why so many kids developed allergies to peanuts is because parents weren't feeding them to their kids, so they weren't able to develop the proper antibodies for them. Parents were overprotecting their kids.

Now THAT is interesting. And makes sense. Peanut butter allergy was unheard of in my hillbilly youth, where all kids ate the PBJ. I even remember that the first time I heard of the allergy, I thought it might have been a spurious claim - a medical error.

Something very interesting here. Isn't there?
 

Birdboy48

Well-known member
Jul 10, 2011
Remember folks, these regulations only apply to "sensitivities".

There was a big and well-documented paper that came out about a year ago, that went into all of the various perfume ingredients that were linked with cancer, and regulators haven't even begun to get started on those yet.
 

Bonnette

Missing Oakmoss
Basenotes Plus
Jul 25, 2015
In 2014, Frederic Malle predicted the demise of high end perfumery if something like this were to happen; he said that he would be "finished." Then he sold his line to Lauder, as if to prove the point. Everybody stock up on your favorites while they're still avalable and affordable.
 

SydnorIII

Well-known member
Jan 5, 2017
And if you happen to buy something compliant?

The likelihood of me doing that is slim to none these days. If I were to buy something that is IFRA/EU compliant, it’s because it still contains mostly natural ingredients, which is becoming increasingly rare.


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HouseOfPhlegethon

be huffin' parfums
Basenotes Plus
Jan 3, 2017
Not good news for most.

I won't be stocking up on back-up bottles. I don't do it now, nor have I in the past, with the exception of a handful of fragrances. And that, was only because I got those back-up bottles for dirt cheap. At 57 y.o., I have enough for perfume for the rest of my life anyway...
 

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