The Perfume Of Sex...ultimate taboo...the human body...?

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david

Well-known member
Jun 7, 2005
An uncomfortable subject for many, but worth discussion nevertheless.
Many are shocked and repulsed by Secretions Magnifique and the connection to sperm - and I believe there is also a fragrance called Vulva which possibly relates to a female equivalent. I have not tried either of these so I cannot comment.

As self-produced natural perfumes from humans it seems strange that they are viewed so negatively.

Hoping for sensible open discussion here.
 

Melbourne Man

Well-known member
Sep 23, 2016
I think I prefer fragrances that evoke associations with these particular odours (I get this with a couple of Francesca Bianchi scents) through clever compositions, than anything that literally smells like semen, genitalia etc
I guess I just want it to be a wearable scent because otherwise I would just not shower after sex.
 

Bangkok Hound

User of Toilet Water
Basenotes Plus
Nov 4, 2015
We generally want to eliminate or cover up body odors, not wear perfumes that smell like them.

BTW, to me, Secretions Magnifique smells like a wet dog that has rolled around in shellfish that has gone bad. If anything related to sex smelled like SM, the human race would have gone extinct long ago.
 

cacio

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Nov 5, 2010
I have not tried $$$ Vulva, but I have Sec Mag, and luckily, it does not smell like sperm. Luckily because, as BH explained, the smell of SM would be a very powerful deterrent to the related activity (to my nose the closest smell is that of decaying oysters, whose smell humans have evolved to avoid as potentially deadly).

But regardless of these specific perfumes. Animalic notes are very much appreciated in many perfumes-warm skin, slight sweat, leather, all can conjure hints of the warmth of sexual activity. But sperm comes at the end of said activity. I wouldn't say the smell is repulsive, but it's not particularly interesting either. I'd describe it as sort of a mix of chlorine-aquatics, perhaps with floral touches. I once wore an iris body lotion after swimming in a highly chlorinated pool, and I had a clear impression of the material in question.

(I'll let others comment on the female counterpart.)

cacio
 

mrcologneguy

Well-known member
Jan 2, 2009
I think most civilized people prefer hearts and flowers romance to crude bodily odors. At least while clothes are still on.
 

Finnster

Banned
Dec 25, 2017
What are you asking exactly? Are you unfamiliar with how olfaction works?

no i’m just a heterosexual male who does not know what semen smells like. for obvious reasons.

i mean if you’re a homosexual then more power to you. got nuthin but love for ya.
 

fritter

Well-known member
May 13, 2018
no i’m just a heterosexual male who does not know what semen smells like. for obvious reasons.

i mean if you’re a homosexual then more power to you. got nuthin but love for ya.

It has a pretty strong odor, you've never smelt it?
 

Diddy

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Oct 14, 2015
As self-produced natural perfumes from humans it seems strange that they are viewed so negatively.

Hoping for sensible open discussion here.

For me, it's not as simple as viewing the smell of sex so negatively. It's not that cut and dry, as it depends on circumstances. For instance, even though many people wear fragrance or have a lingering smell of fragrance during intimate moments, the smell of what's occurring isn't repulsive. If it were, people would stop in the moment or perhaps even avoid it. We naturally produce smells that entice and excite others. On the other hand, I'd rather not reak of passionate love making and then sit among family. Others may recognize the smell, and then, on some level have invaded my privacy. Or rather I've forced something from my private life into theirs. And there's nothing that says "let's fight!" more than coming home smelling like someone else than your significant other.

I hope what I'm saying makes sense... The smell of intimacy, loving, sex, is not offensive in practice and overall general essence. But there are times in life that you are in situations where it's perhaps best not to smell like you've been doing the Tuft & Needle two step.
 

freewheelingvagabond

Well-known member
Jun 10, 2012
An uncomfortable subject for many, but worth discussion nevertheless.
Many are shocked and repulsed by Secretions Magnifique and the connection to sperm - and I believe there is also a fragrance called Vulva which possibly relates to a female equivalent. I have not tried either of these so I cannot comment.

As self-produced natural perfumes from humans it seems strange that they are viewed so negatively.

Hoping for sensible open discussion here.

I think maybe it's the context of perfume usage?

Apart from sexual activities, people's perfumes are often secondary to clothes (as in, you can find people wearing clothes but no perfume, but not the other way around in public). Therefore, the purpose of perfume is largely to accentuate one's style and, sometimes, personalities. Since bodily odours form a different association (intimacy, sex etc.), they are at odds with one's public persona, moreover, perfumes are also associated with cleanliness and grooming, and bodily odours are a contradiction.

Currently the niche perfumery would produce whatever a buyer might buy. I think many buy it for shock or shtick.
 

Bavard

Wearing Perfume Right Now
Moderator
Basenotes Plus
Jul 20, 2015
Secretions Magnifique doesn't smell like sex to me. It's much more like a wet dog in the opening, and then soap in the base.

Al Oudh by L'Artisan Parfumeur smells like sex in the base, which I like, although I really don't like the opening.

I think clean sex smells should have a bright future in perfumery.
 

Heawns

Well-known member
Nov 16, 2008
I won't comment on the fragrances for now, but when it comes to this question of "they can show people getting shot in the head but not a penis shooting sperm on a woman's face" (talking about regular movies or something).

Well I think there are many more benefits of saying "I can kill" than "I just got jizzed on", basically. Killing people and violence is one of the most effective activities in human history, it solves all kinds of problems relating to survival and competition (can also cause some problems but leaving that aside). Shooting sperm on people, or shooting sperm on multiple people, and in particular their exterior skin, probably more rarely solves human survival and competitive problems.

I also think there's something about sex that doesn't require showing off the ability to engage in it as much. It's just such a strong drive that it can be taken for granted more easily, all people need to do to engage the sex drive is to look at someone's face for a split second. Whereas with violence showing that you are strong and capable of violence in more prolonged displays can negate the need to use actual violence, but with sex you have to do it to get a benefit through the evolutionary process.

That's just some early morning ramble
 

BoyChanel

Well-known member
Jun 18, 2014
no i’m just a heterosexual male who does not know what semen smells like. for obvious reasons.

i mean if you’re a homosexual then more power to you. got nuthin but love for ya.
With all due respect, that's a dumb rationale. Your answer reminds me of classic closeted dudes who over-rationalize the most benign topics but they don't realize they're only drawing more attention to what they're trying to cover up.
 
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Diamondflame

Frag Bomber 1st Squadron
Basenotes Plus
Jun 28, 2009
I find overtly sexual fragrances (marketing-wise) a turn off. Prefer them on the sensual and subtly seductive side.

And +1000 on ‘don’t feed the troll’.
 

epapsiou

Always be smelling
Basenotes Plus
Sep 28, 2015
. And there's nothing that says "let's fight!" more than coming home smelling like someone else than your significant other.

Mrs. D is very tolerant. My wife won't fight if I came home smelling like that. Best case scenario, she will kill me quickly ;)
 

Heawns

Well-known member
Nov 16, 2008
I recall this older conversation on a similar topic by scentemental and others:
http://www.basenotes.net/threads/27...n-addictive-Do-you-like-fecal-scent-fragrance
It's good to see some mature, thoughtful, and informative posting. This subject tends to bring out reflex reactions in many people that don't necessarily make for particularly interesting or informative reading.

Here's a post of mine from a while back rewritten substantially. I would have simply linked to the original post after some brief introductory comments, but the sorry excuse for a search engine on this site makes it next to impossible to track anything down:

A key constituent of civet is indole, which, along with skatole, is a key aromatic component of human feces. At a certain dilution, indole is highly floral. In fact, indole is actually a key part of the aromatic profile of certain white flowers, jasmine and orange blossoms, to name just two. Civet was a key component of many white-floral accords in classic perfumes because it gave an added dimension, body, and extension to the floral notes of such accords. It literally fixed the floral notes. Civet is one of the great fixatives. Like oakmoss it imparts its own characteristic olfactory aura as it slows down the evaporative rate of the lighter more volatile components in the perfume, and, at the same time, like oakmoss, it leaves these lighter more volatile components essentially unaltered so that they predominate unmasked and unmodified. No synthetic fixative comes close to having this complex effect, and this effect is inseparable from the indolic component of civet.


The ambivalence we feel over the indolic and animalic notes in general is to a large extent caused by the tension these notes create in us as we try to process them olfactorily. Do I like this fecal/animalic smell? Yes I do, but, wait, maybe I don't, but then, again, yes, I do, and before you know it, this vacillation has actually kept one engaged at a very deep olfactory level as one wavers trying to make up one's mind about whether the note is attractive or disgusting. No other type of note creates this kind of ambivalence and tension. It is the tension that arises from this ambivalence that keeps one fascinated by indolic and animalic notes in fragrances. It's a "troubling" attraction. Great perfumers understood this on the most conscious of levels and on the most visceral of levels also. Indolic and animalic notes are also just as powerfully attractive when they exist at a liminal level, and they frequently do in many classic men's and women's fragrances. I have actually found that you can seriously ruin a fragrance for some people (usually men) when you point out the indolic, richly animalic, or even urinous notes to them in a fragrance they like.


Indolic, richly animalic, and even urinous notes when blended well, it should be observed, appeal, at a very deep level, to the primal recognition and attraction of bodily odors by which--in our not so distant past--we used as the main means of identifying and "knowing" our fellow creatures, much like dogs do when they sniff each other. Of course, these bodily odors were very closely tied to sexual attraction. The hippocampus, the smaller primal brain within the brain, is not only the primal seat of emotions, but it is in large part the place in the brain in which smells are processed and hence connected with emotions and with attraction. Smells, especially indolic and animalic smells, connect us to the primal sniffing self. You can't, for the most part, have a neutral reaction to indolic or animalic notes. Notice the responses in this thread. You either love such notes or you "hate" them. Culture, gender, and, of course, the vagaries of human individuality provide the differences by which we all process and react to indolic, urinous, animalic notes in general. (What follows is entirely speculative.) My suspicion, however, is that gender plays a larger role than we imagine. Men generally tend to prefer their animalic notes in the form of leather notes, a somewhat sublimated and bodily removed set of notes that tie them at a primal and cultural level to their hunter origins. Much of this explains, on one level, why there are such strong, diametrically opposed responses to such strongly animalic fragrances like *Kouros* and perhaps, also, why so many women tend to find Kouros an unproblematically attractive fragrance on a man. Of course, women's fragrances have, traditionally, tended to be about seduction and so, not surprisingly, indolic and urinous notes have featured prominently in such fragrances, but for men, I suspect that that attraction is most powerful when it’s liminal. On another very deep level, I suspect women are less troubled by indolic and urinous notes than men because of their experience of and closer proximity and exposure to bodily fluids as a result of the primary role they have historically taken in child rearing.

scentemental
 

Heawns

Well-known member
Nov 16, 2008
There are so many fragrances with oudh, civet, castoreum, indolic flowers and so forth, that are quite popular. However I think I'm more a fan of the "salty skin" type smell (especially if combined with other things that are totally different) rather than a unidimensional animal leather or strong feline smell that hints towards urine. The best examples that I own of this "salty skin (but not only)"-smell are probably Une Fleur De Cassie and Dans Tes Bras, both from the house of Frederic Malle. You can smell them and not particularly notice anything intimate or odd about them, but you might also notice it quite a bit, and it's combined with very different things.

Ufdc smells very benign, bright, white, yellow, honey and floral, with apricot and something like a greenhouse note which has nothing to do with intimate parts of bodies, but it also has the "sweaty butt-cheeks" note gently blended in there (which I assume is from a bunch of musks and indolic parts of the florals like jasmine and cassie flower).
Dans Tes Bras possibly smells like clean female genitalia (or if we want to be less vulgar we can say salty intimate skin...with some hint of sourness) but again it's not too obvious and a bunch of contradicting notes complement this. According to Maurice Roucel there's a ton of musks in DTB, and I assume he doesn't just mean Cashmeran®.


Right now I'm wearing Ambrarem by HdP and it does smell salty and a bit like a cat that hasn't washed for some time. I enjoy wearing it and it smells nice but in the long run it probably falls in the same vague category as something like Cuir D'Arabie by Montale - too unidimensional and I'm not sure I like the hint of urine (ambrarem) or fecal note (Arabie) that have no notes to hide behind.
 

Rüssel

Well-known member
Dec 23, 2010
I'd assume that people generally don't want to smell like massive, walking private parts, if it is even possible to recreate these smells very well. Such scents probably wouldn't be very versatile as not everybody is attracted to the intimate smells of strangers of either gender.

Imagine the threads. How many sprays of Penis No 1 can I wear to a job interview, guys?
 

Diddy

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Oct 14, 2015
Mrs. D is very tolerant. My wife won't fight if I came home smelling like that. Best case scenario, she will kill me quickly ;)
[emoji23][emoji23][emoji23] OH trust me. A quick death would be the best I could hope for as well! She's nothing worry about with me. I'm scared...
 

slvrbckgorilla

Well-known member
Feb 16, 2011
I have actively avoided these fragrances. Not what I am looking for when choosing a personal fragrance. I prefer to encounter those olfactory experiences organically.
 
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