Synchronized Fridays 2021

Ken_Russell

Well-known member
Jan 21, 2006
The current sync theme sounding and also being doubled by fairly generous options even from a wardrobe fairly modest or at least average (at least by BN standards) joining in tomorrow or slightly after tomorrow may not be much of a problem and/or challenge
 

ClockworkAlice

We all smell here
Basenotes Plus
Jan 3, 2019
I am visiting my parents right now, so I grabbed three travel sprays/rollerballs with me, and they're each French (Guerlain's Aqua Allegoria Mandarine Basilic), Italian (Dolce & Gabbana Pour femme) and American (Nectar Blossom and Pomelo by Artistry - a perfume line by Amway, an American brand, not in directory).

I'm currently wearing the sweet, powdery and girly Pour femme, but I think all three will have their chance to shine today!

Edit: Oh, I see my mom is still keeping her Armani Lei... in the bathroom counter, and it means she either likes it less than her other perfumes or wants to finish it quicker and definitely doesn't mind sharing. It's a slightly shampooey-woody-musky scent with some aspects of pineapple and coconut, nothing too special, but an easy wear and quite nice and also Italian, so I might steal some of it after shower, too!
I wonder why she doesn't like it when J'Adore is one of her favourites and it's another shampooey fruity floral, but maybe it's the different vibes or aspects that makes the difference for her. Or maybe it's just a bit too powdery/woody and not fresh enough for her.
 

Puma

Well-known member
Dec 7, 2013
As temperatures here are still rather high, I want something refreshing and long-lasting for today's sync:

French: Bandit by Robert Piguet
Italian: Iris Nobile by Acqua di Parma
American: Safari by Ralph Lauren
 

donna255

Well-known member
Jul 16, 2004
L'Eau de Jatamansi by L'Artisan Parfumeur is my choice, French.

In truth, I have not been wearing fragrance this week apart from once.

It has been 30c plus here in Ireland, and and we have an amber heat warning. Hell, we are lucky to get 21c usually. So too hot for me to wear fragrance.
 

JON RODGERS

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Dec 5, 2007
Forza Italia
ital.gif



St-Marks-Square-basilica-campanile-Venice-Italy-blue-hour.jpg



3020_628f47f1fd6c8ef1e2e63db1b73d2bbe_venezia_uomo_eau_de_toilette.jpg
 

incense+heliotrope

Well-known member
Nov 20, 2017
Joined the Synch last night with Etro Shaal Nur, and today with Caron Yatagan (any excuse), in this heat.
Likely to continue synching through the weekend with Dior Fahrenheit, Guerlain Vetiver, and Bottega Veneta pH EdT
 

Wingie

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Dec 2, 2009
Pretty much everything I own is game for today’s sync!

I’ve also just received an order of samples and one is Estée Lauder Private Collection, so I’m syncing in this one currently to explore it more. More French/Italian/American samples to possibly follow later.

Happy Friday everyone!
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
Given the preponderance of fragrances that are French, Italian, or American, it seems to me the proper challenge is to find one that’s French, Italian, AND American. So I give you…

40DF5D79-74F8-4516-9614-EE7C6437F6DC.jpg

Fabergé - Cellini for Men

An Italian fragrance by an American company with a French name.
 

LiveJazz

Funky fresh
Basenotes Plus
Mar 16, 2006
Given the preponderance of fragrances that are French, Italian, or American, it seems to me the proper challenge is to find one that’s French, Italian, AND American. So I give you…

Fabergé - Cellini for Men

An Italian fragrance by an American company with a French name.

I was trying to think of something like this in my collection last night and failed miserably. Nice job!
 

Wingie

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Dec 2, 2009
Given the preponderance of fragrances that are French, Italian, or American, it seems to me the proper challenge is to find one that’s French, Italian, AND American. So I give you…

Fabergé - Cellini for Men

An Italian fragrance by an American company with a French name.

Bravo - though with a name like Fabergé I wouldn't have thought they were American. I did a little research and saw they were founded in Russia in the 19th century and then sold to an American cosmetics company in the 1960s. Quite an interesting history actually, in that they served the Russian Tsars and then later were nationalized by the Bolsheviks in 1918. I guess the Bolsheviks weren't much into fancy jewellery, as they moved to Paris in 1924. I learned something today!
 

Cook.bot

Common Lackey
Basenotes Plus
Jan 6, 2012
Fabergé - Cellini for Men

An Italian fragrance by an American company with a French name.

Good one!

I'm going to split the difference between Italy and France and go with Corsica. Part of Italy until 1755 when it was given to Louis XV to pay off a debt, it only registered in my mind as Napoleon Bonaparte's home until I developed a massive crush on Marc-Antoine Corticchiato.

Corsica Furiosa by Parfum d'Empire

corsica-furiosa-13030-7965681.jpg
 

IsoESuperman

People of Zee Wurl, Relax
Basenotes Plus
Dec 30, 2015
Azemour les Orangers for me. A French perfume house helmed by a Corsican with an Italian sounding last name, sprayed onto an American. Fits the bill, I think.

Seemed to pair extra nicely with humping two cords of firewood. Although anything might have today. After a July of mainly rainy or cloudy days...or "sunny" days with an eerie orange/pink haze of wildfire smoke from 3000 miles away, we finally had a low humidity sunny Friday, with smokeless skies. This weather has the serotonin pumping and probably any perfume would have felt right.
 

LauraH

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Feb 24, 2021
PStoller and Cook.bot win for creativity! I’m just using this as an excuse to wear three different perfumes today.
USA: Estee Lauder Pleasures
Italy: Armani Sí
France: Not sure yet, probably Twilly or Boucheron.
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
Bravo - though with a name like Fabergé I wouldn't have thought they were American. I did a little research and saw they were founded in Russia in the 19th century and then sold to an American cosmetics company in the 1960s. Quite an interesting history actually, in that they served the Russian Tsars and then later were nationalized by the Bolsheviks in 1918. I guess the Bolsheviks weren't much into fancy jewellery, as they moved to Paris in 1924. I learned something today!
In fact, the Fabergé family—originally Favri, and changed over many generations—hailed first from France before migrating to Russia, where they established themselves as fine jewelers in 1842 (at which point they added the accent to the last “é” for flair). The Revolution forced them to flee in 1918.

Samuel Rubin appropriated the name in 1937. When the surviving Fabergés in Paris found out, they wanted to sue, but given the expense, they settled for a one-time payment of $25K in 1951 to grant a permanent license to Rubin and his successors to use the name for fragrance. The emboldened Rubin registered the name for many other uses—including jewelry. He then cashed out in the 1960s for $26M.

He should have held on. Through a series of mergers and acquisitions, Fabergé was purchased by Unilever for $1.5B in 1989, which then applied the name to everything down to toilet cleanser. The Fabergé family got the last laugh, though, when they bought back all the rights to their name in 2007 and reattained their former elite status as fine jewelers.

https://www.faberge.com/the-world-of-faberge/timeline
 

Wingie

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Dec 2, 2009
In fact, the Fabergé family—originally Favri, and changed over many generations—hailed first from France before migrating to Russia, where they established themselves as fine jewelers in 1842 (at which point they added the accent to the last “é” for flair). The Revolution forced them to flee in 1918. Samuel Rubin appropriated the name in 1937. When the surviving Fabergés in Paris found out, they wanted to sue, but given the expense, they settled for a one-time payment of $25K in 1951 to grant a permanent license to Rubin and his successors to use the name for fragrance. The emboldened Rubin registered the name for many other uses—including jewelry.

Through a series of mergers and acquisitions, Fabergé was eventually purchased by Unilever for $1.5B, who applied it to everything down to toilet cleanser. The Fabergé family got the last laugh, though, when they bought back all the rights to their name in 2007 and reattained their former elite status as fine jewelers.

Thank you for those details. It does make more sense that the Revolution forced them to flee, given who they catered to - those ornate jewel-encrusted eggs they were known for look like a symbol of bourgeois indulgence of the highest sort.
 

Earlyn

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Jun 14, 2019
Given the preponderance of fragrances that are French, Italian, or American, it seems to me the proper challenge is to find one that’s French, Italian, AND American. So I give you…

Fabergé - Cellini for Men

An Italian fragrance by an American company with a French name.

Nice convergence!

I have no idea if I have such a trifecta fragrance in my collection so syncing with
Morning - AA Pamplelune
Midday - K de Krizia Eau de Parfum
Evening - Estée Lauder Amber Nude
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
The longevity of the Cellini is such that I don’t need a SOTE to sustain the sync, so if anyone else is looking for a “hat trick” fragrance, I suggest:

Halston - Z-14 or 1-12. Halston was an American designer, Max Gavarry was a French perfumer, and while we can’t be sure whether the elusive Vincent Marcello was Italian, we can be certain that bottle designer Elsa Peretti was.
 

LiveJazz

Funky fresh
Basenotes Plus
Mar 16, 2006
The longevity of the Cellini is such that I don’t need a SOTE to sustain the sync, so if anyone else is looking for a “hat trick” fragrance, I suggest:

Halston - Z-14 or 1-12. Halston was an American designer, Max Gavarry was a French perfumer, and while we can’t be sure whether the elusive Vincent Marcello was Italian, we can be certain that bottle designer Elsa Peretti was.

Excellent! I’ll wear it today!
 

Ken_Russell

Well-known member
Jan 21, 2006
This time considering to follow/join team (and theme) USA, however inclined towards at least one fragrance named in a certain way that combines both US and also Italian and/or Italian American suggestions-namely Giorgio by Giorgio Beverly Hills
 

Latest News

Top