Sauvage. Loved by the people. Hated by the snobs.

Schnitter

Basenotes Junkie
Aug 11, 2014
Loved by the people. Hated by the snobs.
One of the most successful scents ever made. It's sold in large quantities all over the world. It's loved by the people, but the snobs/perfume-nerds seems to hate it. It's syntetic, "showergel" and bla bla bla..
How can so many people be wrong? :)
Eh... MANY times. When the majority thought earth was flat, OJ Simpson not guilty, when most thought planets revolved around earth, burning "witches"... I'm sure you can find more examples.

Sauvage has just been pushed by sales associates and youtube "reviewers" so hard that it snowballed into population. It's "ok" of a fragrance, I like Sauvage Elixir way more, but neither are 10/10 products.
 

ultravisitor

Basenotes Dependent
Nov 4, 2014
It's not me. It theses damn chuckleheads that put on 10 sprays and then go into public settings where it's not feasible to keep a 200 foot distance from them.

I probably think those people are just anosmic to it - rather than from any wrong intent. But It's not even the strength that bothers me but the range. A fragrance that's strong up to 10 feet away is fine. But if a fragrance can project 200 feet away, it's hard to avoid.
I have read someone here say that applying like 12 to 15 or so sprays of an already strong perfume made him feel sexy.
 

purecaramel

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Nov 9, 2013
Can Dior reformulate this fragrance already so it doesn't project as much.
Can? Yes.
However it would be disastrous for the Shareholder at the moment.
Reforming down will be gradual.
Understanding the market and how it affect sales will be deciding factor.
Balance between reducing it's potency to have the consumer's up their consumption without losing it's mass appeal.
A brilliant product. Close Kin to the Scents of Tide and Gain laundry Detergents.
 

Varanis Ridari

The Scented Devil
Basenotes Plus
Oct 17, 2012
Can? Yes.
However it would be disastrous for the Shareholder at the moment.
Reforming down will be gradual.
Understanding the market and how it affect sales will be deciding factor.
Balance between reducing it's potency to have the consumer's up their consumption without losing it's mass appeal.
A brilliant product. Close Kin to the Scents of Tide and Gain laundry Detergents.
I mean galaxolide was originally designed for detergents like Tide and Dawn, so all of our blue freshies are more-closely related to what we scrub dishes and clothes with than we'd care to admit. I almost bet you could bottle the fragrance of Tide at EdT strength and someone would wear it. I mean, that's almost what Wings by Giorgio is, right? (At least to my nose).
 

Hugh V.

Basenotes Dependent
Dec 9, 2016
I remember trying Sauvage and Bleu de Chanel at Macy's. They both smelled very good, but at the time I was looking for some type of old school unicorn scent that would trigger my nostalgia while standing out from everyone else. That fragrance didn't exist. And by the time I came around to the modern blue ambroxan trend, Sauvage was already being worn by everyone.

One of them, I don't know which, is the more boring of the two. The one that isn't boring is pretty damn good, but the high amount of ambroxan must trigger some kind of allergies for me because I sweat when wearing it.

I personally love the blue shower gel smell, as it's extremely pleasant and smells fresh. As much as I love old school, "stinky" fragrances like Kouros and Polo, I actually enjoy the so-called "crowd pleasers."

As much as I dislike the popular mainstream stuff, I have to admit that they're still exciting scents. 1 Million is not for me but I "get" it and I actually like smelling it on others. Invictus...way too candy sharp, but still, I think it does what it's meant to do well. I have a hard time believing that Sauvage is popular just due to marketing.
 

WarmJewel

Super Member
Oct 5, 2022
The one that isn't boring is pretty damn good...
I have a hard time believing that Sauvage is popular just due to marketing.
I rather suspect that the one that you feel is 'good' is Bleu de Chanel and the one that is boring is Sauvage, as that's been my relatively brief experience of them.

I quite like Bleu de Chanel it has that usual Chanel quality to it but I don't like it enough to want to own and wear it. Sauvage unfortunately is dull as ditchwater, there's nothing novel, new or innovative about it, it's a fragrance created by a marketing department with one aim and one aim only—sales. It's a metallic, patchouli ambroxan mess.

Its popularity isn't just about marketing. The fragrance has been designed to be mass appealling. It contains all the popular freshie accords and has the one thing so many users seem to cry out for—nuclear sillage and longevity. Read any review (and those requests, looking for...) of almost any fragrance and you'll see one theme stand out amongst them all—criticism of sillage as in not enough or I want massive sillage. Sauvage assuages (sorry!) those desires.

Personally (and it is only my personal opinion) I think Sauvage is one of the most disgusting fragrances I've ever had the misfortune to put my nose to.

There is nothing good about Sauvage, apart from the profits it brings Dior.
 

ihxb01

Super Member
Jan 26, 2020
Was flabbergasted by a post on Sauvage EDT by the guys from a Telegram channel @sciscent.

Turns out, nothing is overdosed in it.

It has only 13% of Ambroxan (for instance, BR 540 has 28%, FM Promise has 40%), 3% of Trimofix as a woody amber ingredient (Ellena used it in Epice Marine), 2% Vetiveryl acetate, Habanolide as laundry musk. 10% pachouli, 12% Hedione. No norlimbanol, no galaxolide.

90BEA93B-1E7E-455D-8963-B848AEF7D120.jpeg
 

Varanis Ridari

The Scented Devil
Basenotes Plus
Oct 17, 2012
Was flabbergasted by a post on Sauvage EDT by the guys from a Telegram channel @sciscent.

Turns out, nothing is overdosed in it.

It has only 13% of Ambroxan (for instance, BR 540 has 28%, FM Promise has 40%), 3% of Trimofix as a woody amber ingredient (Ellena used it in Epice Marine), 2% Vetiveryl acetate, Habanolide as laundry musk. 10% pachouli, 12% Hedione. No norlimbanol, no galaxolide.

View attachment 305115
Perhaps the "overdose" of ambroxan is in relation to the other materials aside from hedione and patchouli?

I know BR 540 has so much going on aside from the ambroxan that folks (like me) go anosmic to it when wearing it (although I can smell it from afar easily).

FM Promise is also -very- heavy on other notes too, like cypriol and castoreum, and it's very sour for it.

Of course, I don't know percentages on those, but I have a guess the ambroxan was wielded in a way with Sauvage that it's meant to smell buzzy.

Whereas on the other hand, the heavier doses of ambroxan in those other fragrances just sit behind the rest of the composition and push it "forward" to the nose.

Ambroxan seems to be used more as a booster than a starring note, with Sauvage being a notable exception. Just my theory.
 

JyyskNotes

Super Member
Mar 12, 2012
I have tried every concentration of Sauvage and have hated each and every one of them. And I wanted to like them, really did. Also my Girlfriend hated the Sauvage edt or edp (can't remember which) when I had her smell it on me. That said, my very first fragrance when I got into this hobby was Bleu de Chanel. It had just come out and it blew my mind. I don't wear it anymore but have great memories attached to it. To me Sauvage is just a way worse version of BdC.
 

ihxb01

Super Member
Jan 26, 2020
I know BR 540 has so much going on aside from the ambroxan that folks (like me) go anosmic to it when wearing it (although I can smell it from afar easily).

FM Promise is also -very- heavy on other notes too, like cypriol and castoreum, and it's very sour for it.
The guys dissected them both and discovered BR 540 has quite a simple structure, whereas Promise has nightmarish one.

Whereas on the other hand, the heavier doses of ambroxan in those other fragrances just sit behind the rest of the composition and push it "forward" to the nose.

Ambroxan seems to be used more as a booster than a starring note, with Sauvage being a notable exception. Just my theory.
That’s my new theory as well. I myself am on the quest to identify the ingredients that obstruct me the smelling over ingredients in dark blue/Bleu perfumes. I don’t get any freshness from them and after a couple hours they are gone. Always thought it was some woody amber or musk molecules since I can wear/smell BR 540, Promise, Molecule 02 just fine. But maybe it is the technique how the ambroxan is used, i.e., without blending.
 

JyyskNotes

Super Member
Mar 12, 2012
Loved by the people. Hated by the snobs.
One of the most successful scents ever made. It's sold in large quantities all over the world. It's loved by the people, but the snobs/perfume-nerds seems to hate it. It's syntetic, "showergel" and bla bla bla..
How can so many people be wrong? :)
It has nothing to do with being right or wrong. No one can deny the fact that Sauvage (any concentration) is synthetic mass pleaser with low quality ingridients and very boring scent profile. One can not simply make an affordable fragrance with expensive raw materials. And if a fragrance is too complex, masses would not buy it. I do admit Sauvage is one of the most remarkable fragrances in recent history but that doesn’t make it a great smelling fragrance to me. I hate the smell but would prefer to love it since it is fairly affordable and readily available everywhere to buy. It just smells horrendous to me.
 

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