Sample of the Day - September 2021

Cook.bot

Common Lackey
Basenotes Plus
Jan 6, 2012
"I
can
tell
that
she
was
born…

TAMARIAN!"

Well, that one went right over my head.

iu






puppy-dogs-head-KlHAj3SS5lVC0
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
Actually, the line is "she was born Hungarian"! :rolleyesold:
Yes, but I was using it as a joke on “Tamarian.”

As CookieB knows, this tangent is a Star Trek: The Next Generation reference. In one episode, the Enterprise is in a face-off with a Tamarian ship. The Tamarian captain who, in the manner of his people, speaks only in metaphors based on Tamarian mythology, refers to “Darmok and Jalad at Tanagra,” a myth of antagonists who become friends when they fight a common enemy at “Shaka, when the walls fell.” Picard doesn’t know Tamarian mythology: hilarity ensues.
 

Cook.bot

Common Lackey
Basenotes Plus
Jan 6, 2012
Yes, but I was using it as a joke on “Tamarian.”

Aha. Somehow I'd completely forgotten that line. It's been a good long time since I saw (or listened to) MFL.

Picard doesn’t know Tamarian mythology: hilarity ensues.

Sidebar: as a non-Trekker, this is actually the only episode of TNG that I've ever seen, and only because I was forced to watch it by a linguist friend who was fascinated by the idea of an all-analogy language and the translation problems that would present. So, big coincidence that you chose to illustrate your perfume gobbledygook reference with that particular TV show.
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
Sidebar: as a non-Trekker, this is actually the only episode of TNG that I've ever seen, and only because I was forced to watch it by a linguist friend who was fascinated by the idea of an all-analogy language and the translation problems that would present. So, big coincidence that you chose to illustrate your perfume gobbledygook reference with that particular TV show.

I think the real coincidence is that both ST:TNG and Maison Violet chose to use "Tanagra," the Greek derivation of which doesn't make any sense in either usage, but both making a point (however unintentional in at least one case) about linguistic gobbledygook. And then your coincidence on top of that…!
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
Boadicea the Victorious - Intense

I found a stray BtV sample, so I figured I'd get it in under the wire for the September thread.

"An indulgent luxury for the senses. This scent is warm and inviting with it’s [sic] pure decadence…a delight that must be experienced. Effortless & Opulent: For those keenly aware of their environs, ever alert to the forces of change, Intense is a perfume that resonates perfectly. Emanating an intense ardour, it quickly envelops the wearer in its rich, creamy background notes, dancing on the skin with hints of rose and honey and sharpening the senses with bright citrus vibes. This is a fragrance that is intensely rewarding—some might even say addictive—combining a restless energy with deep decadence that comes only from years of experience in the scent making profession."

Top: citrus fruits
Heart: jasmine, honey
Base: vanilla, patchouli

BN's directory entry adds lily to the top, but I didn't perceive any, though there may be some relatively anonymous aldehydes.

As is too often the case with BtV fragrances, Intense—isn't. The citrus on top is razor thin, more a pointy abstraction than any identifiable fruit; the patchouli on the bottom is, with the help of the vanilla, essentially a unidimensional chocolate note; and the jasmine/honey heart is so anemic, I didn't even know it was there. Eventually, the honey adds sweetness as more of a base than a heart note, but it's too little, too late, not that it would have been great had it been more present.

Granted that I came in with low expectations, I'm generally willing to give a fragrance a fair shot. If I ever find my BtV Monarch sample, I'll try that, too. But at this point, even with a couple of fragrances I kinda sorta like, I have to regard the house as a fail.
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
9/27:

MPG-GdP.jpg

Maître Parfumeur et Gantier - Grain de Plaisir

“Offered to victorious athletes in the antique Greece, worshipped by the Romans, celery was acknowledged for its masculine virtues. Rich in celery essence, Grain de Plaisir by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier possesses green tonalities with luscious vegetable notes. The mint and citrus fruit develop the fresh natural notes of the celery while rich base notes of exotic wood, musc and amber intensify the spicy tonalities. Grain de Plaisir has a very crisp and attractive character.”

Top: lemon, mint, aldehyde
Heart: celery seeds, mastic tree, myrtle, lavender
Base: fir absolute, Java vetiver, musks, sandalwood

A well blended and balanced fragrance, my problem with Grain de Plaisir is, alas, its raison d’être: as a fragrance note, celery seed is a grain that affords me scant plaisir. I dislike Yatagan because of it, and somehow manage to enjoy Phileas despite it. But Phileas is a robust fragrance, whereas GdP is a more delicate composition, so even though there's plenty else here, nothing takes the spotlight from the celery. I would probably adore this without celery seed, perhaps subbing in some other herb or spice: basil, sage, tarragon, coriander—please, anything else. As it stands, I respect Grain de Plaisir, but will almost certainly never again wear it.

(For my SOTE, I switched to vintage Stetson. I think it smells like baby powder, but my wife likes it, so I guess I’ll keep it.)
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
DS2-W.jpg

Dsquared2 - Wood

Allegedly, this has all sorts of neat things from Calabrian bergamot to violet leaf and vetiver. Don’t believe it. It’s the same anonymous synthoid “blue” crap every other imagination-deficient designer has cranked out for ages. It smells nothing like wood, but it vaguely resembles the adhesive of cheap packing tape.
 

teardrop

Well-known member
Sep 1, 2010
Yesterday I tried Au Coeur du Desert by Tauer:

This opens with effervescent spices & incense, topped with citrus. There's a powdery softness to it, so that it feels light & airy, not heavy or dense. It begins to sweeten a little ten minutes in, & as it evolves there's smoky labdanum, a touch of cumin, woods, & a subtle hint of something like camphor or menthol. Around ninety minutes in, it's less bright & more intimate, with leather, patchouli & ambergris in the base. From here it slowly fades, until twelve hours in it's barely there.

I don't dish out five stars easily, even to my favourites, but this one is really beautiful! I could hardly stop huffing my arm while wearing it. It's meditative & soothing, very present but not loud, & perfect for a late summer/early autumn day. It's almost ten years since I tried LDDM, but I'd say this one leans more feminine, & where LDDM was dark, this is brighter. It's like a dust devil swishing around you in a sunlit desert landscape, rather than a sandstorm blasting your senses & blotting out the light. To make something so deep & resinous feel so gentle is a very clever trick. Masterful work!
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
02444699-28EB-4451-B175-26E751F902E7.jpeg

Musicology - White is Wight (2020)

“The purity of the cotton echoes the virginal white of jasmine and the milky sweetness of musks and almond milk. On top, the ultimate softness of the cotton accord is refreshed by the aquatic tones of the lotus flower. The note is sublimated at the heart by the luminous and sensual floral nuances of petal jasmine. A delicate milky accord of white woods and almond milk envelopes the dry down of its comforting trail.”

Top: cotton notes, lotus flower
Heart: jasmine petal, captive musks
Base: white woods, almond milk

My hopes aren’t especially high based on the blurb and the pyramid, but the perfumer is Nathalie Lorson, whose work for Maison Violet impressed me recently. So, here’s hoping!

*

Sadly, no surprises, save that it smells less like cotton than one might have hoped. About as memorable as Michael Delpech.
 
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PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
Musicology is a French brand inspired by pop music. Michael Delpech had a big hit in France in 1969 with "Wight is Wight," which was about the Isle of Wight Festival, and also a joke on Los Bravos' "Black is Black." So, the "hippy white flowers" fragrance name "White on Wight" is a further play on words.

Unfortunately, the "yo mama" joke is apt, as this is nothing more or less than I expected. Lorson could have done this in her sleep, and may very well have.
 

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