Recreating valentino uomo

Jan 5, 2022
Hi everyone, This will be my first post, so I’ll give a brief intro on what got me here: Lately I’ve been doing a lot of reading on DIY perfumes and became fascinated by it, I love experimenting and fragrances so 1+1=2 I think? Now I am here, at the side of the pool wanting to take a deep dive into DIY perfumes.

As my first goal I have in mind to create a Valentino Uomo like fragrance but with a twist. I know it is very far fetched for now but I think it is good to have a goal in mind. I was wondering If anyone had any idea on which ACs valentino uomo is most probably comprised of so I can at least get those ACs and start to learn them. Any additional info as in proportions would ofcourse be welcome!

If anyone has recommendations on already existing formulas which are interesting to recreate and/or close to valentino uomo I am all ears and would love to hear about them.

PS why valentino uomo? I love how well balanced that fragrance is soft powdery leathery warm with a fresh opening it probably is one of my fav fragrances (for now at least :D).

Thanks!
 

pkiler

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Dec 5, 2007
In this case, a GCMS result would be extremely confusing for you, given the amount of naturals in the formula. Really, you should try to make guesses and read the Scent and Chemistry post and try it that way. Incidentally, several people have remarked to me that it needed improvement, because it does not last well, so you may incorporate better longevity into your formulation efforts.
 
Jan 5, 2022
Hi Medicinal Chemist and welcome!

You can start by reading this post on Facebook for Valentino Uomo. It is well described and talks about a lot of ACs that are in the fragrance.

Thank you @Lucofborg, very detailed and interesting post I did not pick up on a lot of it when smelling but that’ll propably be because of the lack of knowing the ACs.

I do get the feeling that the basenotes aren’t well described and there’s more to explore?
 
Jan 5, 2022
Thanks Pkiler,
With “Really, you should try to make guesses and read the Scent and Chemistry post and try it that way.” Do you mean what is described in the post? Because It says nothing about amounts and proportions and I would have no idea in what amounts to combine those ACs.

Regarding the GCMS chromatogram, are there any of valentino uomo? And is there a place where I can find chromatograms of fragrances?

In this case, a GCMS result would be extremely confusing for you, given the amount of naturals in the formula. Really, you should try to make guesses and read the Scent and Chemistry post and try it that way. Incidentally, several people have remarked to me that it needed improvement, because it does not last well, so you may incorporate better longevity into your formulation efforts.
 

mnitabach

Well-known member
Nov 13, 2020
Basically, the answer to your question is that without access to any actual formula, you will have to first learn perfumery (takes year(s)) & then re-compose this fragrance pretty much from the ground up, altho apparently with the benefit of knowing at least some of the materials that are in it (this is not nearly as useful as it sounds like it should be, tho). As far as focusing your perfumery learning process on particular materials purportedly in this fragrance, that is also not likely to be nearly as useful as it sounds like it should be. IMO, the fastest route to you being able to make a perfume akin to this one is to start learning perfumery in a general way, choosing basic fundamental materials to work with at first on the basis of their applicability to simpler learning exercises. Then you can build from there.
 
Jan 5, 2022
Very true as there is no exact formula I’ll have to take the stairs and start learning the hardway :D

Well are there any reccomendations on beautiful and interesting smells I can recreate (with recipes ofc.)?
 

mnitabach

Well-known member
Nov 13, 2020
Very true as there is no exact formula I’ll have to take the stairs and start learning the hardway :D

Well are there any reccomendations on beautiful and interesting smells I can recreate (with recipes ofc.)?

There are enormous amounts of discussions on this forum for how novices can get started, including with "recipes" (perfumers call them formulas) and analyses of how such formulas work. One reasonable place to start if you want to dive right into creating an actual complete perfume (and not just a simpler accord) is to search the forum for "fougere".
 
Jan 5, 2022
There are enormous amounts of discussions on this forum for how novices can get started, including with "recipes" (perfumers call them formulas) and analyses of how such formulas work. One reasonable place to start if you want to dive right into creating an actual complete perfume (and not just a simpler accord) is to search the forum for "fougere".
Thanks mnitabach I’ll look into it ;)
 

Casper_grassy

Well-known member
May 5, 2020
You can send a sample of the fragrance to “phytochemia” for a good analysis. It’ll cost twice the amount of the fragrance and as Paul said it probably won’t be easy for you to interpret. But it is a start.
Also that is a very good post, because what was said in it, probably accounts for more than 70-80% of the fragrance, if not more. Sure there are no amounts but You can buy all of the materials in it and learn them.
There is only the “hardway”
 

mnitabach

Well-known member
Nov 13, 2020
You can send a sample of the fragrance to “phytochemia” for a good analysis. It’ll cost twice the amount of the fragrance and as Paul said it probably won’t be easy for you to interpret. But it is a start.
Also that is a very good post, because what was said in it, probably accounts for more than 70-80% of the fragrance, if not more. Sure there are no amounts but You can buy all of the materials in it and learn them.
There is only the “hardway”

I suspect that it is more difficult to learn how to interpret a GCMS of a perfume containing a decent amount of naturals than it is to learn perfumery itself, and the latter is almost certainly a prerequisite for the former.
 

Casper_grassy

Well-known member
May 5, 2020
I suspect that it is more difficult to learn how to interpret a GCMS of a perfume containing a decent amount of naturals than it is to learn perfumery itself, and the latter is almost certainly a prerequisite for the former.
The OP asked, so I provided.

It's a foreign language if you don't know what you're looking at or for rather.
You are absolutely right, learning perfumery will greatly help interpreting gc reports.

Just for the simple fact that it says "there's a lot of bergmot. . . extended by Ethyl Linalool and Linalool", can already throw you off.
 
Jan 5, 2022
Thanks to both of you. As a chemist Ive interpreted a fair share of ms chromatography reports so that should not be that hard.
Now you make me wonder what exactly the author of the post meant with "there's a lot of bergmot. . . extended by Ethyl Linalool and Linalool" :)
 

mnitabach

Well-known member
Nov 13, 2020
Thanks to both of you. As a chemist Ive interpreted a fair share of ms chromatography reports so that should not be that hard.
Now you make me wonder what exactly the author of the post meant with "there's a lot of bergmot. . . extended by Ethyl Linalool and Linalool" :)

The issue with interpreting GCMS of perfumes containing substantial amounts of naturals isn't identifying the molecular identity of peaks. The issue is that many natural materials contain overlapping molecules. For example, many perfumes contain bergamot and lavender essential oils. These both have a lot of linalool & linalyl acetate. So the issue is figuring out from linalool & linalyl acetate peaks on GCMS whether it contains bergamot, lavender, and/or other floral/herbal materials containing these molecules. The presence or absence of other molecules can help disambiguate identities. But this very quickly becomes very very complicated & it can be impossible to estimate relative quantities of natural materials even if you can determine that they are in there. You need to know as much perfumery to interpret GCMS data & use it to reconstruct a perfume as you do to compose a perfume de novo.
 

Casper_grassy

Well-known member
May 5, 2020
Lmfao damn Mike beat me to it and said exactly what I said, just way better.

There are soooo many overlapping molecules in regards to naturals


Also just to add, it may have x% of linalool and y% of linalyl acetate, and it could contain bergamot, lavender and both molecules in isolation. Slipper mo f’in slope
 

Lucofborg

Well-known member
Apr 27, 2018
You should get an Orris base. My favourite one is the Iris Absolute Synth from Firmenich. For me that base is halfway there. It smells of Dior Homme and Valentino Uomo. It is strong so you won't need a lot.
 

tobacco

Well-known member
Jun 27, 2020
Very good information and advice from the experts and advanced members of this board. I am into home perfumery now for almost 3 years and with my limited ability I could have come up with an V. Uomo like blend some months ago cause I am also fascinated by this fragrance.

Materials that can go into are

Clary Sage Oil
Tangerine Oil
Orris Givco
Pyralone
Ethyl Vanillin
Tonka Bean Abs.
Coumarin
Timbersilk
Musks (Habanolide, Ethylene Brassylate, Ambrettolide, ...)
Hedione HC
Sclareolate
Cuir 17500 (Leather Base)

The key to this fragrance is IMO to combine leathery aspects with vanillin and Clary Sage. Not so much magic actually.

Edit: I am referring to the Intense version, not sure how much/if it differs to the standard Uomo

Edit 2: Tonka Bean Abs. is not needed because of Coumarin already present, could be left out w/o much of a difference.
 
Jan 5, 2022
@Casper_grassy @mnitabach seems very logical, thank you for clarifying how troublesome the chromatographs get. It seems next to impossible without proper perfumery knowledge…

A little offtopic Does the guy from scents and chemistry (philip kraft) describe the fragrances merel by smelling from a strip or does he use a gas chromatograph for smelling (combined with gcms interpretation?).
And how do most people analize fragrances for recreation purposes I guess not with gcms interpretation?
 
Jan 5, 2022
Very good information and advice from the experts and advanced members of this board. I am into home perfumery now for almost 3 years and with my limited ability I could have come up with an V. Uomo like blend some months ago cause I am also fascinated by this fragrance.

Materials that can go into are

Clary Sage Oil
Tangerine Oil
Orris Givco
Pyralone
Ethyl Vanillin
Tonka Bean Abs.
Coumarin
Timbersilk
Musks (Habanolide, Ethylene Brassylate, Ambrettolide, ...)
Hedione HC
Sclareolate
Cuir 17500 (Leather Base)

The key to this fragrance is IMO to combine leathery aspects with vanillin and Clary Sage. Not so much magic actually.

Edit: I am referring to the Intense version, not sure how much/if it differs to the standard Uomo

Edit 2: Tonka Bean Abs. is not needed because of Coumarin already present, could be left out w/o much of a difference.
Thanks very insightful! Could you perhaps share amounts/percentages?
 

tobacco

Well-known member
Jun 27, 2020
Thanks very insightful! Could you perhaps share amounts/percentages?
I gave you a rough and minimal sketch to reproduce this fragrance by listing all ingredients I used. That is not a shortcut to satisfyingly (for you) clone this fragrance.

If you're interested in understanding your goal it is very helpful to get (those or similar) materials and play with their proportions. Coming up with your own formula is rewarding. The creation process is worth the efforts and will give you much more in return as compared to me posting my full blown formula here.

Also if you provide a starting point of a formula that you are unhappy/struggling with I am 100% sure the BN swarm intelligence can give you a hint into the right direction.
 

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