hirch_duckfinder

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 8, 2006
I placed an order from Profumo recently and he was generous enough to send me a number of samples which I will review in this thread as I test them. If anyone else has any of these, please post your thoughts.

Remember these are all natural perfumes.

Rose des Bois:
A gentle rose combined with a very green woody aspect (some rose petitgrain?) and maybe something animalic (which drops off quickly) followed by a tea-like aspect with or of the rose note. There is another floral too, I think? A spot of jasmine? Anyway, it is beautiful. All this is supported by an everlasting base of sublime vanilla with a little sandalwood and a touch of something else a little acerbic or skanky, maybe blackcurrant or that floral I can't place, I'm not sure. The base accord reminds me of a classic guerlainade made with the best possible materials. The vanilla and wood holding the soft aspect of the rose is just exquisite. It is a little rich but not sweet and a touch thorny without being sharp.

This scent has very low projection after the initial few seconds but endures extraordinarilly well as a skin scent.

More to follow....
 
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Pour_Monsieur

Well-known member
Sep 22, 2008
Looking forward to hearing the rest of your thoughts Mr Duckfinder , Ive had an itchy finger on more than one occasion to try some Profumo samples :)
 

Asha

Well-known member
Jan 15, 2008
I have sampled Rose de Bois as part of our sample rotation project on the women's discussion board. I found RdB to be very spicy and green, and the rose was deeply couched within the stronger notes. The cinnamon was very strong for me, but after it fades, the fragrance is pure bliss. I too love the vanilla wood base when only a whisper of cinnamon remains and the rose and green notes are mostly gone.
 
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L'Aventurier

Well-known member
May 8, 2008
I also very much enjoy Rose de Bois - it's quite the composition. It lasts extremely long for an all natural perfume and has sillage to boot on my skin. I find RdB to be epitome of a very comforting and reassuring fragrance, quite motherly actually. The cinnamon, vanilla and wood all combine to create a rich, powdery and hazzy ambience, like a soft comforter made of down. The rose is especially sneaky to my nose, popping in and out while keeping the gourmand nature of the scent in check. There are also minute green aspects to RdB as well, but the blending camouflages their true identity. Although there are certain star ingredients that take front stage, (like cinnamon, vanilla and sandalwood), there are also other carefully balanced supporting notes that I detect yet cannot decipher, much in the same way that a crowd adds to a movie scene without stealing the limelight from the protagonist.

I definitely get a little bit of the Guerlain vibe from this one. However I've only tried a few Guerlains so I can't say too much about this. Hirch, correct me if I'm wrong, but Guerlinade is often described as a vanilla-like powder, right?
 

mikeperez23

Be Here. Now.
Basenotes Plus
Dec 31, 2006
Did someone say rose and cinnamon!?

Ever since I have tried two rose/cinnamon combo scents that didn't work for me in the long run (Bois de Paradis by Parfums Delrae and Elixir by Penhaligon's) I have been on the hunt for a good rose/cinnamon scent. Looks like I'm gonna have to try Rose de Bois. Thanks hirch!

BTW - how do you BUY Rose de Bois? I just spent a couple of minutes browsing the Profumo site and I can't find RdB!?
 

L'Aventurier

Well-known member
May 8, 2008
Mike, if you go to the page called "sampling the scents of the soul" and then scroll to the bottom there's a picture link with the word "OUTSIDERS" on it - that'll take you to the decants of Rose de bois, among other "new" scents from Profumo. I think you have to purchase 6 of them at once though. I can send you a sample from mine if you'd like, just PM me.
 

mikeperez23

Be Here. Now.
Basenotes Plus
Dec 31, 2006
Mike, if you go to the page called "sampling the scents of the soul" and then scroll to the bottom there's a picture link with the word "OUTSIDERS" on it - that'll take you to the decants of Rose de bois, among other "new" scents from Profumo. I think you have to purchase 6 of them at once though. I can send you a sample from mine if you'd like, just PM me.

Thanks for your kind offer L'aventurier, but I'm confused...do they only sell Rose de Bois in sample sizes not in full bottles? Why? Is it a rare expensive oil (like an aoud or attar)?

EDIT: Ah...I see it now...the full 50 ml bottle is for sale ($120 US dollars).
 
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arwen_elf

Well-known member
Dec 12, 2007
Did someone say rose and cinnamon!?

Ever since I have tried two rose/cinnamon combo scents that didn't work for me in the long run (Bois de Paradis by Parfums Delrae and Elixir by Penhaligon's) I have been on the hunt for a good rose/cinnamon scent. Looks like I'm gonna have to try Rose de Bois. Thanks hirch!

BTW - how do you BUY Rose de Bois? I just spent a couple of minutes browsing the Profumo site and I can't find RdB!?

Edited
 
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hirch_duckfinder

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 8, 2006
Cuba Express

Begins with a strident blast of sweet rum, dry cocoa, something peppery and a distant orange, I think also some frankincense. Next I get a mocha effect with a gentle sticky coffee and dusty cocoa coming to the fore. As the tobacco creeps in underneath there is, I think, some spicy bay oil giving reference to the traditional bay rum formula. What a tobacco note! - deep rich powerful and horsey! At once herbal and animalic. Now it settles with the tobacco up front and the spices giving a physical depth, as if I can smell into my arm. Then cloak and dagger games with coffee, spicey notes, rum all spinkled with light, warm cocoa. It is vivid, like a 3D film. Eventually the tobacco and spice seem to burn off a little uncovering a slightly vanillic, mild coffee, residual rum with just a hint of tobacco.

A wonderful journey! I particularly like the way the cocoa lies very lightly on top throughout. None of the supporting notes are loud, in fact none of the notes at all. The balance is evolving and always interesting.

The sillage is pretty good for an all natural perfume and the endurance good.

Oh yes.
 
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mikeperez23

Be Here. Now.
Basenotes Plus
Dec 31, 2006
Rose des Bois:
...The base accord reminds me of a classic guerlainade made with the best possible materials. The vanilla and wood holding the soft aspect of the rose is just exquisite...

I wore the Rose du Bois yesterday afternoon (silly me...a Basenoter had already sent me a sample that I had in my sample pile...) and I completely agree with you hirch, when it dries down it smelled a lot like a Guerlain or Serge Lutens base note...dusty vanilla. The best part of the fragrance.

I found the rose top notes very much like Hammam Bouquet - a sort of toiletry type of rose scent (something in your bathroom that's scented of rose like cream or hair pomade), but very subtle and more cinnamon prominent than I expected. The tea aspect didn't appear at all to me, but I am anosmic to tea in many fragrances for some reason. I thought it was okay, but it didn't really grab me like I expected it to.
 
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scentsitivity

Well-known member
Jan 17, 2007
Cuba Express

Begins with a strident blast of sweet rum, dry cocao, something peppery and a distant orange, I think also some frankincense. Next I get a mocha effect with a gentle sticky coffee and dusty cocao coming to the fore. As the tobacco creeps in underneath there is, I think, some spicy bay oil giving reference to the traditional bay rum formula. What a tobacco note! - deep rich powerful and horsey! At once herbal and animalic. Now it settles with the tobacco up front and the spices giving a physical depth, as if I can smell into my arm. Then cloak and dagger games with coffee, spicey notes, rum all spinkled with light, warm cocao. It is vivid, like a 3D film. Eventually the tobacco and spice seem to burn off a little uncovering a slightly vanillic, mild coffee, residual rum with just a hint of tobacco.

A wonderful journey! I particularly like the way the cocao lies very lightly on top throughout. None of the supporting notes are loud, in fact none of the notes at all. The balance is evolving and always interesting.

The sillage is pretty good for an all natural perfume and the endurance good.

This sounds especially good.
 

Andyjreid

Well-known member
Oct 27, 2008
Cuba Express

Begins with a strident blast of sweet rum, dry cocoa, something peppery and a distant orange, I think also some frankincense. Next I get a mocha effect with a gentle sticky coffee and dusty cocoa coming to the fore. As the tobacco creeps in underneath there is, I think, some spicy bay oil giving reference to the traditional bay rum formula. What a tobacco note! - deep rich powerful and horsey! At once herbal and animalic. Now it settles with the tobacco up front and the spices giving a physical depth, as if I can smell into my arm. Then cloak and dagger games with coffee, spicey notes, rum all spinkled with light, warm cocoa. It is vivid, like a 3D film. Eventually the tobacco and spice seem to burn off a little uncovering a slightly vanillic, mild coffee, residual rum with just a hint of tobacco.

A wonderful journey! I particularly like the way the cocoa lies very lightly on top throughout. None of the supporting notes are loud, in fact none of the notes at all. The balance is evolving and always interesting.

The sillage is pretty good for an all natural perfume and the endurance good.

Oh yes.

This sounds outstanding
 

hirch_duckfinder

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 8, 2006
Tabac

Starts with a slightly boozy blast of tobacco, like an islay malt, smokey and resinous with echoes of hay. For a short while the tobacco remains centre and top until it settles down and it drops into a strong structure with the warm tobacco at the low register, some lovely fluid labdanum, sweet tonka and beautiful vanilla sitting in layers. There are fruity notes too, I'm not sure if these are part of the tobacco itself or seamlessly inmtegrated as flavouring. The drydown is absolutely my favourite tobacco accord of all time. The balance is wonderful, the tobacco is present but not too sharp or musty, not sour and thin or thick and overwhelming but with body and lightness at the same time. The other notes are carefully built around to pull out aspects of its complex smell.
This has instantly become my favourite tobacco scent and one of my favourite perfumes of all. If you like tobacco at all, you must try this.

While the opening is quite masculine, I think the drydown is very wearable by a woman who likes tobacco.

I am not sure if it is the natural materials, the composition or both, but there is something in these profumo perfumes which gives me the impression of 3D, its almost like I can see the layers of the structure, distinct but in balance and with clear air between them.

Edit - is there some castoreum in this??
 
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Profumo

Well-known member
Jun 26, 2006
Tabac

While the opening is quite masculine, I think the drydown is very wearable by a woman who likes tobacco.

- is there some castoreum in this??
Dear hirch_duckfinder,
I am so glad the you like Tabac so much. You are right that many women like to wear it. Non smoker women mostly. Tabacco is for women an aroma heavily loaded with emotional value, because for many of them it is a smell attached to the father's figure. They find it comforting and reassuring. This is the reason why non smoker women still marry smoker men, despite all the trouble it entails for them.

The fruity note you mention is problably (you will recognize it now that I tell you), Clay Sage.

Tabac is unique among the Scents of the Soul by its complexity. From its18 ingredients five of them (a quarter of the fragrance in weight) are complex bases of 10 to 25 ingredients each.
This means that there are about 60 different essences and absolutes in Tabac, many of which are in very small amount, among them is Castoreum.
This is a technique that perfumers use when they want to compose a perfume that can practically never be reproduced as good by others.
 
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hirch_duckfinder

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 8, 2006
Dear hirch_duckfinder,
I am so glad the you like Tabac so much. You are right that many women like to wear it. Non smoker women mostly. Tabacco is for women an aroma heavily loaded with emotional value, because for many of them it is a smell attached to the father's figure. They find it comforting and reassuring. This is the reason why non smoker women still marry smoker men, despite all the trouble it entails for them.

The fruity note you mention is problably (you will recognize it now that I tell you), Clay Sage.

Tabac is unique among the Scents of the Soul by its complexity. From its18 ingredients five of them (a quarter of the fragrance in weight) are complex bases of 10 to 25 ingredients each.
This means that there are about 60 different essences and absolutes in Tabac, many of which are in very small amount, among them is Castoreum.
This is a technique that perfumers use when they want to compose a perfume that can practically never be reproduced as good by others.

Ah Clary Sage, thanks profumo. Maybe that is what I confused with hay too? Interesting about the complex bases. Do many of your perfumes use these? How do you catagorize them - i.e.do you have a floral one/animalic one etc?
 

Profumo

Well-known member
Jun 26, 2006
Ah Clary Sage, thanks profumo. Maybe that is what I confused with hay too? Interesting about the complex bases. Do many of your perfumes use these? How do you catagorize them - i.e.do you have a floral one/animalic one etc?

The bases I use are born as perfumes in themselves, who stand by themselves as having a character and an identity of their own, equilibrated and complete in themselves, just as are single natural ingredients, essential oils and absolutes. I sometimes use Tabac itself as an ingredient in other perfumes.
They are sometimes some of the “scents of the soul” or other bespoke fragrances that I have selected as particularly interesting.
I do that in my later fragrances in order to add olfactory complexity and inimitability, specially if I am composing them for customers who will send them into production (to be sure that it cannot be easily replicated) . However in none of the scents of the soul do I use these complex bases in such a high proportion as in Tabac.
This is what makes it unique among them in this respect.
 
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the_good_life

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Jun 2, 2006
hirch,
I just ordered some samples, including tabac. but I'd be interested anyway in how you would relate tabac to the (complex partly synhtetic) vintage tabarome as well as to the (simple, all-natural) alt-innsbruck tobacco cologne, and perhaps to C&S cuba.
 

Profumo

Well-known member
Jun 26, 2006
hirch,
I just ordered some samples, including tabac. but I'd be interested anyway in how you would relate tabac to the (complex partly synhtetic) vintage tabarome as well as to the (simple, all-natural) alt-innsbruck tobacco cologne, and perhaps to C&S cuba.

Ciao Thomas,
I am sending to you some presents with your order. It is a luck you mentioned that you were a basenoter.
Basenoters should know that they will be treated with very special regards when they order, but I must know it in time. It is enough for them to send me a mail to let me know.
 
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hirch_duckfinder

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 8, 2006
hirch,
I just ordered some samples, including tabac. but I'd be interested anyway in how you would relate tabac to the (complex partly synhtetic) vintage tabarome as well as to the (simple, all-natural) alt-innsbruck tobacco cologne, and perhaps to C&S cuba.

Good questions which I will ponder more over the coming days. For now -

well to start with you have to reset your expectations for all naturals as longevity and projection will follow a different curve, and the natural ingredients in Tabac just smell better to me.

As we have read from its creator, Tabac is very complex and thus strikingly different to alt innsbruck which smells much more medicinal due to the mint which lifts and lightens the tobacco. It is also a different type of tobacco note in alt innsbruck - seems more like a lighter style to me wheras tabac is a little darker, in a low-mid register rather than high-mid. C&S Cuba is complex too, but in a different way, the rum factor makes it more comparable to profumo's cuba express and the tobacco is less prominent in it. C&S cuba blends the tobacco in, Tabac features and supports it. Vintage tabarome - is different again, it feels like an older style and seems to me to follow the cigar route rather than the pipe tobacco route in terms of flavouring the tobacco. It is more of a leathery/fougere than an leathery/oriental perhaps. The synthetics stretch the accord in tabarome, especially the base. It is also a much woodier scent, Tabac isn't significantly woody to my nose but Tabarome contains a hefty whack of cedar (qute natural, I think)...

Hmm, more when I have time to do proper tests.
 

Delmar

Well-known member
Feb 24, 2007
Thanks, hirch!

For some reason, I hadn't gotten around to trying my Cuba Express sample (which came with a small bottle of Sandalwood Mysore) before reading this thread. Although my un-analytical nose is not picking out all the notes you described, what I'm getting (at this fairly early stage) is a very enjoyable 'boozy/resinous' seamless accord. My nose "smiles from ear-to-ear" every time I sniff my wrist! CE is definitely worth sampling. I can see I'm going to have to try Tabac as well. I think I 'get' what you mean by smelling in 3D :)
 

manicboy

Well-known member
Oct 12, 2005
Dear hirch_duckfinder,
I am so glad the you like Tabac so much. You are right that many women like to wear it. Non smoker women mostly. Tabacco is for women an aroma heavily loaded with emotional value, because for many of them it is a smell attached to the father's figure. They find it comforting and reassuring. This is the reason why non smoker women still marry smoker men, despite all the trouble it entails for them.

Sugar daddies need apply? I actually just picked up a sample of this. Haven't worn it yet. Will report soon.
 
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hirch_duckfinder

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 8, 2006
Chillum

Tabarome Millesime eat your heart out.
As written on the profumo.it website, this was created as a bespoke fragrance and is built from three ingredients, Ginger, Tobacco, Sandalwood.
It opens with lots of ginger. Very nice, fresh, green smelling rather than spicy ginger. It smells like the aroma when grating the root into food. Just where it would feel sharp and spicy, at the back of the nose when you breathe in deep and long sits the tobacco note. As the shimmer of the ginger drops down a little, this tobacco comes forward leaving a period of ginger flavoured tobacco, or is it the other way around? The ginger accents the green leafy aspect of the tobacco and the tobacco darkens and warms the spice. This is not a huge tobacco note but a slightly shyer one. Quite soon, the sandalwood comes through into the heart adding a third factor to the balance. It is a slightly vetivery smelling wood to me which keeps the green aspects alive.
Then the drydown - a very nice balance held together by the santal at centre stage with the other players interacting above.
The overall effect is a smoky green, without ever smelling burnt. I can see where the name came from.
Sillage is quite low with this one and longevity medium; the sandalwood remaining after the other notes have drifted away.

This is considerably less complex than the others I have tried thus far though the notes themselves are quite rich and and the balance delicate.

I'm pretty sure this forms one of the accords in Tabac which profumo mentioned above?
 
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hirch_duckfinder

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 8, 2006
Aalacho:

Wow, this one is really special. I wasn't expecting this. Completely devoid of the "essential oil smell". Whoever ordered this bespoke hit the jackpot big time.

Green, green green. Alpine forest air. Cypress? The Italian lakes and up into the alps.
I'm guessing: Frankincense, eucalyptus, cypress, pine, vetiver, sandalwood, moss. Juniper? Labdanum.

Opens with a clean, clearing blast of forest air. Effervescent, cool, very green, the smell of standing trees, not cut wood.
Again, it has a wonderful depth - dries to a slightly sweet substantial resinous base of labdanum.
I haven't got to the far drydown yet, got too impatient to write :eek:. More later.
 
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hirch_duckfinder

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 8, 2006
Not a lot to add except some castoreum I think, just a drop.

The far drydown is the sweet labdanum (and castoreum?), a little of the coniferous notes, smooth sandalwood.

This is an exceptional perfume to me and has become an instant favourite. That is two from this batch of samples with this and Tabac :eek:.

Totally unique, very masculine. Again, superlative ingredients and beautifully blended.

Anyone else smelled this?

Come on....out of the woodwork - who ordered this as a bespoke :p
 
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Nathan214

Member
Apr 27, 2008
Not a lot to add except some castoreum I think, just a drop.

The far drydown is the sweet labdanum (and castoreum?), a little of the coniferous notes, smooth sandalwood.

This is an exceptional perfume to me and has become an instant favourite. That is two from this batch of samples with this and Tabac :eek:.

Totally unique, very masculine. Again, superlative ingredients and beautifully blended.

Anyone else smelled this?

Come on....out of the woodwork - who ordered this as a bespoke :p

Oh OW! All right -- stop twisting my arm already. It was me.

What you're smelling is version #1, which Dominique really likes, but it wasn't quite what I was expecting. He sensed my hesitation with it and graciously created a version #2, which I love (with a capital HEART). In fact, I've already used it up -- it's one of the few bottles of fragrance I've completely emptied.

Violet leaf isn't an essence I'm all that keen on, and version #1 featured it prominently. Version #2 went a different direction with an accord of Opoponax, Frankincense and Tobacco. If you ask nicely, I'm sure Mr. Dubrana will send you some samples so that you can compare the two.

Not that I really should be speaking for Dubrana.

Versions #1 and #2 are very different, yet both are exceptionally well done. BTW: I agree that his Tabac is one of the best tobacco fragrances I've ever smelled. From your notes above, I'm looking forward to trying out the Cuba Express.

I did notice that the Profumo bespoke process is now more involved, and a bit pricier, than when I went through it last year. I think that might be my fault, and I apologize to you all profusely!
 

hirch_duckfinder

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 8, 2006
Wow, thanks for "coming out" :D!

Violet leaf, thats the big green note? Fascinating. I usually hate violet in fragrances (which I guess is usually synthetic) but I love this.
I hate to think how wrong all my other notes are :eek:.

What was the brief :p?
 

Profumo

Well-known member
Jun 26, 2006
Dear Nathan, it was indeed my intention to send Aalacho N° 2 to the basenoters to whom I have send the number one.
It was also my intention to invite you in the discussion of your perfumes once both of them would have been tested by the best of Basenotes expert noses, but Hirsh preceded me.
You are not responsible for the changes in my bespoke procedure (and price increase), rather I decided to change it after the fragrance Mona Lisa composed for Mona.
After I interacted with Laura Donna (http://lauradonna.com) on this last one, I decided that it was important that the person who was having a bespoke perfume could smell the ingredients first. Otherwise there was the possibility that he would be deluded in his expectancies. I hate to delude people.

Dear Hirsh, violet leaf is a very green and narcotic scent of the same family as Narcissi and Jonquil. Not at all like violet flower that exists only as an artificial note.
I found the brief of Nathan in my archives:

“I appreciate bold statements that stand out from the crowd, and I love dry, woody orientals with incense smoke. I'm not a fan of vanilla or heavily sweetened fragrances -- I rarely eat dessert and prefer coffee, instead, but I do appreciate a mellow sweetness. I do not purchase floral fragrances, and tend to avoid perfumes with flowers and/or fruits, including citrus. I like dark earthy musks, the smell of burning leaves and woods (we used to burn cherry wood in the fireplace when I was a child), mossy forests, raw honey, salt, black leather.”

I based my composition on his brief more than on the ingredients listed. When I realized that Nathan was deluded by the fragrance he had received, I just made it again without any liberty, exactly with the accord and the ingredients he had asked me in the first place and sent it to him free.
At this time I only knew that he was a fellow basenoter, and I was not aware of his talent as a reviewer, who is now a finalist at the 2009 FiFi Awards Nominees.
Congratulations Nathan.
 
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hirch_duckfinder

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 8, 2006
Dear Nathan, it was indeed my intention to send Aalacho N° 2 to the basenoters to whom I have send the number one.
It was also my intention to invite you in the discussion of your perfumes once both of them would have been tested by the best of Basenotes expert noses, but Hirsh preceded me.
You are not responsible for the changes in my bespoke procedure (and price increase), rather I decided to change it after the fragrance Mona Lisa composed for Mona.
After I interacted with Laura Donna (http://lauradonna.com) on this last one, I decided that it was important that the person who was having a bespoke perfume could smell the ingredients first. Otherwise there was the possibility that he would be deluded in his expectancies. I hate to delude people.

Dear Hirsh, violet leaf is a very green and narcotic scent of the same family as Narcissi and Jonquil. Not at all like violet flower that exists only as an artificial note.
I found the brief of Nathan in my archives:

“I appreciate bold statements that stand out from the crowd, and I love dry, woody orientals with incense smoke. I'm not a fan of vanilla or heavily sweetened fragrances -- I rarely eat dessert and prefer coffee, instead, but I do appreciate a mellow sweetness. I do not purchase floral fragrances, and tend to avoid perfumes with flowers and/or fruits, including citrus. I like dark earthy musks, the smell of burning leaves and woods (we used to burn cherry wood in the fireplace when I was a child), mossy forests, raw honey, salt, black leather.”

I based my composition on his brief more than on the ingredients listed. When I realized that Nathan was deluded by the fragrance he had received, I just made it again without any liberty, exactly with the accord and the ingredients he had asked me in the first place and sent it to him free.
At this time I only knew that he was a fellow basenoter, and I was not aware of his talent as a reviewer, who is now a finalist at the 2009 FiFi Awards Nominees.
Congratulations Nathan.

Thanks for the information. I didn't do too badly against the brief, I think :):p.
Wonderful stuff. Is the sweet/animalic note honey then? Any labdanum?
 
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Laura Donna

Member
Mar 2, 2009
After I interacted with Laura Donna (http://lauradonna.com) on this last one, I decided that it was important that the person who was having a bespoke perfume could smell the ingredients first. Otherwise there was the possibility that he would be deluded in his expectancies. I hate to delude people.

This is my first-ever post on basenotes. How exciting!

I got involved with the perfume that became Mona Lisa after deciding to devote my life to helping people find scents that will bring them exquisite pleasure. I describe the process my client Mona and I went through on this link: http://lauradonna.com/blog/2009/04/mona-lisa-the-woman-and-the-perfume/.

AbdesSalaam is referring to Mona's reaction after first smelling natural civet, tuberose and mandarin. Her prior experience with these ingredients was primarily in commercial scents. Tuberose from profumo.it does not come off with the same power you find in Fracas! While Mona has some experience with natural perfumery, there is still a mystery surrounding the nature of the civet she experienced many decades ago.

When I first smelled the fragrance called Mona I felt it was more deepening than decorative; I said to myself: "of course!" it must come back to this. It was light and puffy, but not another gourmand marshmallow - more of an animello! The civet is more natural body and for me loses any fecal quality (not that there is anything wrong with that) I might note when sampling it in isolation.

Earlier in this thread someone mentioned having different reactions to the scent at different times. Me too. Sometimes it floats, and sometimes I am more aware of the earthiness of patchouli. Mona Lisa has a few faces. Mona (the client) had asked for something "subtle but killer" - for her, wearing fragrance is a social act as well as a personal pleasure.

AbdesSalaam is right: an experience of the individual notes is wonderful as an aid to the bespoke perfume composition.
 

Asha

Well-known member
Jan 15, 2008
I have lost track of this thread, and now I see it has exploded!

Hirch, I have sampled Cuba Express, Chillum and Aalacho--so far only on paper. My original posts are on the women's discussion board, Quarry's Group Parcel #2.

The strongest tobacco of the three was Cuba Express, and I literally felt as if I were inside a walk-in cigar humidor in a high end tobacco shop. While I am sure I did not identify all the notes, the impressions I had were of preserved orange or tangerine slices (candied and dried), spices (mostly cardamom, if I recall), whiskey, cedar wood and tobacco. I have some sensitivity to tobacco essential oil, so I could not smell this one for very long before I started to have a reaction. That is one reason why I have put off trying it on skin. I agree it is a very intense, complex scent, and it is very enveloping, in a way. It really evokes my imagination.

In Chillum, I could not really smell tobacco, but it smelled soft, spicy and woody--as you mention, it sort of seemed like a subset of another fragrance. It had a smokey and boozy smell to it, sort of like the cherry note I smell in whiskey that was aged in charred oak barrels. The burnt note was interesting to me, and I wondered how it was made. I also wonder if anybody else smelled it as charred wood.

Aalacho reminded me very much of a bag of cedar wood chips, the kind I used to landscape my yard. To describe this more poetically, it was as if cedar wood or bark had fallen in the forest and was in a partially decayed state--still solid and woody, but with enough broken down to give it a slightly fermented tree-resin quality. I agree, it smells like actually being in the forest--not a pile of logs, not a lumber yard, but among the trees in various stages of the forest life cycle.
 
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finsfan

Well-known member
Aug 6, 2003
Wow, this discussion is at once so very riveting and on the other hand, so over my head. I have no idea what Labdunum is other than I see it mentioned when leather is discussed. If someone picks out a note, and then I smell the scent, I maybe can identify it. Like when they say there is chocolate in Cannabis Santal, and I sniff and and then the lightbulb goes out. Or if someone says Gucci Pour Homme has pencil shavings as cedar, then that description goes off in my head when I sniff it.

I think I like what Nathan likes, but I can do fruit (melon and citrus in MI is okay and so is Tangerine Verte by Miller Harris) but some sours on me. I dont like sweet, but Chergui moves me. I like resins (Tauer LDDM) and I do understand the difference in cigar tobacco and pipe tobacco (MH Feuilles de Tabac, wow). Give me spices (Red Vetyver, LDDM) and incense and Nathan hits the perfect scent for me.

Hirch, I do love to read your work. I dont collect many samples as I try not to spend money on them that could go to the few bottles I buy, but I close my eyes and try to imagine what Violet leaf smells like. I loved the old violet shave cream smell by Trumpers (they say that two or three years ago, the EU made reformulations happen).

Tomorrow (it is almost 10 at night here), when I get time, I want to go read through the profumo web site. Nathans scent and Tabac, and another one somewhere all sound so great. Czech & Speake Cuba hit me as too something on the front end, menthol or mint? I like tobacco but Feuilles needs something other than fresh tobacco, and if that is the upper end register, give me that middle note that Nathan and Asha talk about.

I do hope this thread is appended and updated from time to time. Also, that poster who creates the scents (it is hard to remember when you type and can't easily go back to read it when typing) seems so nice, genuine and wanting to meet expectations, he is someone I would do business with. Though I have been around a time and have a few posts under my belt, I am still a new guy when it comes to knowing what it is I like by name and knowing why I like what I do. Again, this is fascinating reading and I appreciate the education it is giving me.

Sam
 

hirch_duckfinder

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 8, 2006
Chocolate Amber

Which really doesn't sound like my style of perfume - and it isn't; though it almost gets there on quality alone. As usual - well made from excellent materials.

It begins with a clear melange of dry cocoa with vanillic amber. Smells like the best quality of dark chocolate without the sugar, could be edible but for the amber which is transparent, resinous and very coherent. After a few minutes I get just a hint of something vegetal underneath. Now..it will surely be linear...these accords will just fade gradually away. No, it develops, dries down to chocolate snow - the pure white vanilla is fluffed up by the tonka and the chocolate melts in infusing the whole affair as a dry powder. Eventually, the chocolate gets more distant and the vanilla light and smooth; tonka with its more earthy inedible quality dominates. There are other things in the base - sandalwood I think, maybe some moss?

Longevity is medium and sillage is low. Its is interesting to me how the natural amber accord starts so true but breaks down and develops, unlike in other perfumes where it is so often stoically linear.

Edit - actually longevity is very good for the far drydown - and it goes back to smelling a bit more chocolatey. Very nice, a little like the drydown of L'Instant Homme EDP with the santal and cocoa (but more natural of course ;))
 
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hirch_duckfinder

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 8, 2006
Frutti Paradisi

This one is a little more abstract. It is centred on Osmanthus flower with jasmine, vanilla, blackcurrant. Profumo writes that it can smell different every day and I can see what he means because this is an impressionistic perfume (unlike others of his where I can relate the ingredients very directly to the smell/intended effect). Green fresh aspects of citrus with some indolic qualities from the florals combine to create illusions of tropical fruits. I can get the sweet aspect of pineapple, the fresh/deep combination of mango, something of the floral quality of pawpaw. The vanilla provides softness, jasmine and blackcurrant the organic, vegetal, even almost-animalic quality and the osmanthus a general vegetal, fruity floral flavour tying it all together. It is not overly sweet, has a subdued freshness and a very unusual natural accord. There is a light feeling of resinous wood underneath and maybe a drop of cocoa too (or maybe that is part of the osmanthus?).

If this perfume starts with a little emulsion, it burns away into clarity. I prefer it when the osmanthus drops away leaving the blackcurrant more vivid. It is lucid and drinkable, quiet and yet present, slightly acidic in a very friendly way, a tiny touch warmly urinous. I could imagine this smelling very sexy on a woman in a warm climate....

Frutti Paradisi does not possess a big colourful fruitiness like the synthetic fruity perfumes but rather pastel shades, and because of the abstraction I lose these somewhat as I deconstruct.

Projection is low and longevity medium. I find the base quite interesting and beautiful though I need to sniff from very close to get the detail. It is not something I would feel moved to wear myself, but it may just hit the spot for some.

BTW - I just ordered some Aalacho and Tabac from profumo as I enjoyed them so much from my sampling - so I am hoping that a couple more samples may come too :p. If so I will write thoughts here as I test, if anyone is interested to read.
 
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Profumo

Well-known member
Jun 26, 2006
Frutti Paradisi

BTW - I just ordered some Aalacho and Tabac from profumo as I enjoyed them so much from my sampling - so I am hoping that a couple more samples may come too :p. If so I will write thoughts here as I test, if anyone is interested to read.
You can count on it Hirsh, and you will not be deluded.
 

Healer

Well-known member
Jul 15, 2004
Many thanks for taking the time to review the perfumes from this line Hirch and TGL and for the background info Profumo. I have been looking at the Profumo site and yours and TGL's reviews will certainly help choice of samples. Cuba Express, Tabac, Chillum and Aalacho especially sound interesting.
 

Delmar

Well-known member
Feb 24, 2007
Many thanks for taking the time to review the perfumes from this line Hirch and TGL and for the background info Profumo. I have been looking at the Profumo site and yours and TGL's reviews will certainly help choice of samples. Cuba Express, Tabac, Chillum and Aalacho especially sound interesting.

I couldn't agree more! :) A package arrived yesterday with 16 ml bottles of Tabac and Cuba Express (Tabac was a blind buy :eek:). I mentioned wanting to sample some of the fragrances mentioned in this thread and did I ever strike it rich with more than 16 ml worth of samples!: Chillum, Aalacho #1 & #2, Acqua d'Angelica, Mona Lisa, & Tasnim.

So far I've been spraying my samples sparingly - probably not "full wearings". I love the way these scents are so clean, natural, REAL, pleasant, refined to name a few adjectives. In my eagerness to smell them, I've acquainted myself with Tabac, both Aalachos, and Chillum. My friend commented spontaneously that Tabac seemed so 'natural'. On my right wrist was Aalacho #2 to which he said, "oooh, that one's so refined"! And I would agree. Tabac has a very comfortable, deep (and almost 'delicious' boosiness) while Aalacho #2 (thanks so much Nathan for sharing it with us!) is a very refined resinous (almost austere) woodiness. If I would compare Aalacho #1 to a fragrance, it would be Czech & Speake Frankincense & Myrrh. #1 seems to have a slightly "sweeter" and perhaps more complex quality while #2 seems dryer and side by side, I found #2 slightly more 'masculine' and dryer - moving closer to a Tam Dao / Hinoki kind of dryness resinousity. Aalacho is ‘calmer’ than Tam Dao yet conjured up an imagery of coniferous trees. Chillum was also a stunner! I'm not sure I was picking up tobacco and ginger. As it moves into the drydown, though, I found it to be very similar to my Profumo's Sandalwood Mysore. If anyone should want a good "sandalwood" look no further I'd say!

If there is one thing I "wished" about these scents: it would be that they could have a little more projection - but I realize that this might be a consequence of the nature of this type of quality natural ingredients. Its a trade off I will be willing to make, though, with this kind of fragrance. :)
 

Profumo

Well-known member
Jun 26, 2006
If there is one thing I "wished" about these scents: it would be that they could have a little more projection - but I realize that this might be a consequence of the nature of this type of quality natural ingredients. Its a trade off I will be willing to make, though, with this kind of fragrance. :)

You are right Delmar, projection with naturals happens in a much more discreet, sober, refined and I say elegant way.
The ingredients do not produce the blast and the sillage that seems to stick to the things it touches.
these are not perfume that call the attention of others by shouting loudly, but rather by singing an old familiar long forgotten melody.
It is a different philosophy of wearing perfume, to be enjoyed as an alternative, to be tried as an experience.
You can maximise the progection and the longevity though, by wearing them on clothes, scarfs, handkerchiefs, hair and lastly on the hairy parts of the body, which is the best because the perfume trapped in the hair lasts very long abd diffuses perfectly with the heat of the skin.

The noble ingredient that Aalacho features and that was not in the first version, the ingredient that was asked to me from the beginning by Nathan but that I did not put, fearing that he had asked it without knowing it (and I was wrong), is the mythical Oppoponax.
This is the reason why I have made the perfume a second time for him without telling him, after realizing that he was not enchanted by the first one. Aalacho 2 is made with all the notes he had asked me, no more and no less.
 
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Delmar

Well-known member
Feb 24, 2007
You are right Delmar, projection with naturals happens in a much more discreet, sober, refined and I say elegant way.
The ingredients do not produce the blast and the sillage that seems to stick to the things it touches.
these are not perfume that call the attention of others by shouting loudly, but rather by singing an old familiar long forgotten melody.
It is a different philosophy of wearing perfume, to be enjoyed as an alternative, to be tried as an experience.
You can maximise the progection and the longevity though, by wearing them on clothes, scarfs, handkerchiefs, hair and lastly on the hairy parts of the body, which is the best because the perfume trapped in the hair lasts very long abd diffuses perfectly with the heat of the skin.

The noble ingredient that Aalacho features and that was not in the first version, the ingredient that was asked to me from the beginning by Nathan but that I did not put, fearing that he had asked it without knowing it (and I was wrong), is the mythical Oppoponax.
This is the reason why I have made the perfume a second time for him without telling him, after realizing that he was not enchanted by the first one. Aalacho 2 is made with all the notes he had asked me, no more and no less.

I can totally understand that "sillage philosophy". I was thinking today, while wearing Chilum (again), how very 'wearable' it was (like Aalacho for that matter). In the type of work situation where one is rubbing shoulders with people the whole day I don't enjoy "throwing my weight around" with my fragrances.

I can relate to that "singing an old familiar long forgotten melody" analogy. :) And I made a special note about spraying these scents on fabric and hair. I've noticed that certain fragrances behave very differently on paper and fabric - compared to the skin. Sometimes the skin will "devour" a fragrance in no time - which is logical as it is a living and breathing thing.

I was just wondering about the opening notes of Chilum. To my nose, there is something almost citrus-like.(?) I obviously need to train my nose to recognize that tobacco note (which Aalacho also has? - along with Oppoponax? that's interesting!). Chillum has a beautiful opening chord - but breaking it down into its sub-notes I find more of a challenge. The drydown, is in unmistakable Mysore Sandalwood territory.
 

hirch_duckfinder

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 8, 2006
Delmar,
I haven't smelled Aalacho II yet. I am looking forward to it, though I am so taken with Aalacho I that I can't imagine I would like it more. I thought the other day, Aalcho I is like a natural version of a cross between GIT and Polo green. That stunning violet leaf note, now I know what it is, it seems so clear.
 
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