Perfumes and Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals

Rock72

Well-known member
Apr 30, 2019
A collaboration between Consumer Advisories in Denmark, the Netherlands, and Belgium, recently published an overview of 20 perfumes where the focused on possible health compromising EDC (Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals):

https://kemi.taenk.dk/sites/default/files/whats-that-smell-report-parfume_0.pdf

Will possible new regulatory frameworks change the landscape of perume in the future, or are the companies themselves making gradual transitionl changes with such in mind? How conscious are you of such when you buy perfumes? I have to admit that I have not, ever, give this a thought.
 

ascentofdreams

Well-known member
May 18, 2021
I am not conscious of this and quite frankly, I find the brochure to be quite alarmist, vague and lack any kind of meaningful evidence based information. It feels like it is pandering to the whole “clean beauty” marketing strategy and not making any real effort to add an appreciable addition to the discussion. I did not click through all of the citations, however the first six fail to site any kind of peer reviewed research that has any specific conclusion. One of the citations, for example, that is used to support a statement about EDCs causing male infertility merely was a review that showed decreased male sperm counts over some decades, and did not, in fact, even attempt any causality analysis on why this was the case.
What this link does provide evidence of is pseudoscience and someone’s wholly inaccurate idea of what constitutes factual research.
 

zerofox

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Aug 31, 2020
Most people who “read” and “research” are laypersons relying on a single study (not infrequently of unknown or dubious publication) headline, abstract, and/or conclusion. I’ve reached a point in my personal life where anyone absent demonstrable statistical literacy with matching relevant credentials begins spouting Facebook word salad science, I walk away.
 

relus

Well-known member
Mar 21, 2019
Ive read that article/ headline also. Was wondering indeed about statements ive read also about mutiple substances in perfumes that were linked at several diseases and such. Im curieus how this topic is held upon amongst us, collectors and lovers of perfumery. Couldnt bare the tought of not using a scent. Also, do you take this in account on spraying on skin, or only on clothes? Or is this nonsense anyway?
 

Schubertian

Well-known member
Apr 8, 2021
Of the entire daily/monthly/yearly/lifetime chemical load of an average person, how much is really due to perfumes compared to other commonly used hygiene and household products? What about diet and food sources of potentially harmful substances? I missed a bit of context here and the report seems partly speculative.
The EU is already very strict (in some people's opinions, unduly so) and has banned a lot of ingredients outright instead of relying on better labelling, even though when it comes to unhealthy junk foods, alcohol etc., apparently labelling works just fine...
Personally I do favour unscented products in daily hygiene, in washing clothes, dishes, etc. and I'm not saying the issue isn't real, but when put into context fine perfumes are probably not the main culprits.
 
Apr 24, 2021
Of the entire daily/monthly/yearly/lifetime chemical load of an average person, how much is really due to perfumes compared to other commonly used hygiene and household products? What about diet and food sources of potentially harmful substances? [....]
The EU is already very strict (in some people's opinions, unduly so) and has banned a lot of ingredients outright instead of relying on better labelling, even though when it comes to unhealthy junk foods, alcohol etc., apparently labelling works just fine...
Personally I do favour unscented products in daily hygiene, in washing clothes, dishes, etc. and I'm not saying the issue isn't real, but when put into context fine perfumes are probably not the main culprits.

I'm not an expert at all on the chemicals of concern, but seem to be used for scented products which means they are most likely in detergents, soap, air fresheners, and the like in addition to perfumes. However, it's possible that the absorption of these chemicals is much higher due to how perfume is applied to skin rather than when fragrance is smelled in the air because of the dilution effect in air.

I feel like the research is probably in its infancy with regards to these chemicals in perfumes. If I recall correctly, it's been less than fifty years since everyone has finally agreed that cigarette smoke is deleterious to health. Who knows what discoveries are yet to be made with respect to these chemicals used in perfumes...
 

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