Osmanthus Accord

parker25mv

Well-known member
Oct 12, 2016
Let's talk about trying to put together an osmanthus accord from ACs. Where to begin?

Osmanthus, also called "tea olive", is related to lilac but has its own very distinct type of smell. It's a little fruity and apricoty, and the fragrance is reminiscent of peach tea. But there are other things in there, deeper things almost reminiscent of leather.

I have both a live osmanthus plant with little flowers on it and some dried flowers for tea.

The strongest part of the smell comes from peach aldehyde (peach lactone).
Some of the background is composed of the "tobacco" AC Tabanon (this is the same thing as megastigmatrienone).
Together, just these two things make up most of the natural smell of osmanthus.

(Peach aldehyde is pretty tenacious, might only need between 5 to 9% of it in the total fragrance. Even though Tabanon makes up less than 0.5% of the total fragrance it still has a strong effect)

There might be a little Beta-ionone as well (15-16%).
(Beta-ionone is a little more reminiscent of osmanthus and less specifically reminiscent of violets than alpha-ionone, although they both smell similar)

It's not natural, but a little bit of Apritone can help strengthen and coordinate with the peach aldehyde.

According to a headspace analysis there is linalool (19%), ocimene (13%), and smaller amounts of cis-3-hexenyl butanoate (grassy, fruity)(0.35%), hexyl butanoate (trace amount), linalool oxide (0.8-2%), and a very small amount of gamma-terpinene (0.13%).

(cis-3-hexenyl butyrate or -acetate, with benzyl- or octyl butyrate, could probably work as substitutes here)

Also contained less than 1 percent jasmone (so use Hedione), although I can tell from the smell this is not a very strong part of the fragrance.

The smell also contains "3,7-dimethyl-1,6-octadien-3-ol formate" (Linalyl formate) in fairly high amounts (maybe up to 8.7%).
(maybe 2 parts linalyl acetate to 1 part geranyl formate could be a substitute for this)

It contains Theaspirane in trace amounts (less than 0.8 percent). Beta-ionol (2%), citral (0.4%).
It might also contain up to 22% nonanal (C-9 aldehyde).
 
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AJ Dave

Well-known member
Aug 5, 2020
I have an osmanthus bush too. The fresh flowers smell very different from the absolute. The fresh flowers barely have leathery or dried fruit notes.

To me, the strongest part of the smell clearly comes from beta ionone. I think I have an ionone hyperosmia. When I smell beta ionone, I am immediately smell osmanthus and freesia.

Dihydro beta ionone is also in the flowers, but it's less characteristic, and it has a heavy woody beta caryophyllene-like note that changes everything.

The next most important part of the smell comes from l-linalool. If you only have plain dl-linalool with the definite coriander smell (from d linalool), then ethyl linalool can be substituted, because it doesn't have the coriander smell.

The peachy apricot note comes from gamma decalactone. This by itself has an unsatisfying dry plasticy lactone smell. It only smells like apricots or osmanthus in combination with the other materials. It's still like magic to me how that happens.

Beta ionone, linalool, and gamma decalactone are most of the smell. A bit of theaspirane adds a warm, juicy, tea-like smell, and gets you close to the full smell. I can't comment on tabanon. I should have that one.

Other things like cis-jasmone, beta damascone, geraniol, linalool oxide, citral, aldehyde c-9, and synthetic ocimene aren't characteristic. They change the smell too much away from osmanthus unless if only used in traces.

Cis 3 hexenyl butyrate (cis 3 hexenyl butanoate) isn't that characteristic, but a little bit adds a warm juicy jammy stone fruit smell.


 
Mar 8, 2017
I find its quite like a fruity animalic ambery leather sort of aroma on the absolute. I'd think that Civet, ambrarome, labdunum, beeswax absolute could play a part with the peachy aspects
 

parker25mv

Well-known member
Oct 12, 2016
The next most important part of the smell comes from l-linalool. If you only have plain dl-linalool with the definite coriander smell (from d linalool), then ethyl linalool can be substituted, because it doesn't have the coriander smell.
Thank you. That's an incredibly useful observation.
 

AJ Dave

Well-known member
Aug 5, 2020
Thank you. That's an incredibly useful observation.

I tried different accords with different linalools. The ethyl linalool smelled better than plain linalool.

I also tried different accords with different lactones. Gamma undecalactone was too sharp and fresh. Delta decalactone didn't smell right. Gamma dodecaltone gave a nice deep fruity smell, but only Gamma decalactone gave the right deeper apricot osmanthus smell. Not that additions of the others can't help.

I'm getting tabanon, apritone, and some other chemicals.
 
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parker25mv

Well-known member
Oct 12, 2016
I found this osmanthus accord formula somewhere else. I still think my idea is better, but if you want to see an actual balanced formula, here you go:

Osmatto S&C
rose oxide
nerol
damascenone 10%/DPG
Hedione HC
nerolidol
gamma-decalactone
gamma-dodecalactone
Beta-ionone
Beta-dihydrioionone
alpha-Irisone
2.00
10.00
2.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
2.00
10.00
20.00
1.00
clary sage oil 10
chamomile oil
Stemone
Ambroxan
Okoumal
elemi oil
sweet vernal grass absolute
ethyl vanillin
______
total
10.00
1.00
1.00
3.00
4.00
1.00
3.00
1.00
_
100.00

While the osmanthus–tea acccord is well explored, another ionone-rich scent formed by carotinoid degradation is tobacco. Thus, just felt like to explore osmanthus–tobacco …which gave birth to 'Osmatto', with the osmanthus part on the left and the tobacco part on the right side, in a ca. 3:1 ratio (76:24) in the order of the evaporation profile.

As everyone knows, omanthus needs a big heap of a woody–orris β-ionone/β-dihydroionone (1:2) accord juxtaposed to peachy-nectarious lactones such as γ-decalactone/γ-dodecalactone (5:1), and we accented the ionone accord with a little touch of α-Irisone for an extra bit of orrisness. Mild, peculiar, rose–lily floralcy was added by a nerol/nerolidol/Hedione HC (1:1:1) combo, which then was accented in a rosy way with rose oxide and a touch of damascenone 10%/DPG. That completes the osmanthus accord with a green-leafy slightly metallic anchor point to integrate into the tobacco frame that is to tone down the osmanthus sweetness.

We constructed the dry tobacco dry-down from Ambroxan/Okoumal (3:4) as we had no cost concerns, and juxtaposed a heather note of elemi oil/sweet vernal grass absolute (Flouve oil, 1:3), underscored and sweetened by 1 part of ethyl vanillin. So this will be below the osmanthus heart, and for the top instead of going with linalool and linalyl acetate we chose the more complex and soft clary sage oil with chamomile oil (10:1) for dry herbalcy, accented with 1 part of the green, tobacco-leafy Stemone to bridge and introduce the rose oxide from the osmanthus accord.

And indeed, this dry tobacco accord serves very well as a cool tea replacer! Hope you enjoyed this sketch, some 15 min of weighing fun [...] Since the ionones and lactones are such integrative materials, osmanthus is a really cool beginners theme, where one almost cannot fail.
 

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