Nuclear bomb like projection and longevity using only aroma chemicals

mnitabach

Basenotes Dependent
Nov 13, 2020
I think I have cinnamaldehyde but don't know how to use it so I have kept it aside .
There's no way to learn how to use it except by using it. It's great to ask questions, but looking at words on a screen--no matter how wise, detailed, or expert--can only benefit so much. The only way to learn perfumery is to compose, assemble, test, and vary enormous numbers of formulas.
 

Neua

Basenotes Member
Jun 8, 2022
There's no way to learn how to use it except by using it

Instead why not just put javanol over 15% and see what you get? If you want a nuclear bomb, then you have to think nuclear-ly
Can't smell it even at 0.5 % of formula
Also no one smelled anything when I applied 20g timbersilk and 0.25g javanol which is strange 😒
I thought my formula would be nuclear bomb but it was just a paper bomb 😁
 

Casper_grassy

Basenotes Dependent
May 5, 2020
Can't smell it even at 0.5 % of formula
Also no one smelled anything when I applied 20g timbersilk and 0.25g javanol which is strange 😒
I thought my formula would be nuclear bomb but it was just a paper bomb 😁
Timbersilk isn’t a massive projecting material and with the ratio you have the timbersilk could be keeping the javanol down.
I also want to point out, considering you have no experience, what you’re asking for requires skill, experience, knowledge and intuition. You got a lot of good advice and you should start slow. If you want nuclear bomb fragrances, buy them for now and in the interim work on your craft
 

Neua

Basenotes Member
Jun 8, 2022
Timbersilk isn’t a massive projecting material and with the ratio you have the timbersilk could be keeping the javanol down.
I also want to point out, considering you have no experience, what you’re asking for requires skill, experience, knowledge and intuition. You got a lot of good advice and you should start slow. If you want nuclear bomb fragrances, buy them for now and in the interim work on your cra0.5 javanol by it's own would be better for my goal
 

ourmess

Basenotes Junkie
Apr 25, 2018
I think I have cinnamaldehyde but don't know how to use it so I have kept it aside .
If you keep it set aside, you will never learn how to use it. The only way to learn anything about perfumery is to do it.
 

RockArse

New member
Apr 24, 2022
I don't know if it is any help but this is my personal nuclear bomb.

Tabanon45
Shangralide Oliffac150
Cedroxide70
Vanillin20
Clearwood200
Sylvamber300
Civet5
Courmarin15
Benzoin Resinoid Pourable30
Cocoa hexenal30
Maple Lactone5
Fruit Sec50
Ethyle Maltole40
Ethyl vanillin40
Total 1000

Really different and well liked. I have lots of people ask where it can be bought. Don't over spray.
I started making a bend of the drier ingredients. The Shangralide and Tabanon make something that is really loud together. After several trials increasing the other dry ingredients I had a smoky musk woody musk that wasn't too jarring.
 

RockArse

New member
Apr 24, 2022
I started making a bend of the drier ingredients. The Shangralide and Tabanon make something that is really loud together. After several trials increasing the other dry ingredients I had a smoky musk woody musk that wasn't too jarring.
I then made a blend of sweeter ingredients that I liked and combined the two. The results were a little surprising. The maple lactone started to come more to the fore especially that slight bread note it sometimes has. I have since discovered that Shangralide bring out this in maple lactone.
 

Bmaster

Super Member
Sep 24, 2021
This is in part and in some degree, one of the challenges of perfuming. Picture the top notes, mid notes, and base notes as a game of "tuggle war". Thus, you need to think about what you are seeking which according to your topic is a nuclear bomb fragrance with projection and longevity. Thus, you are primarily going to be dealing with base notes and perhaps mids, certain powerhouse materials at the top are applicable. IMO, you will want to rule out hedione or IES as they will dampen the aroma in commonly used amounts. Another consideration, you need to be careful with using multiple powerhouse materials at the base as they can drown each other out. The expenditure for the perfume will be quite high as the nice powerhouse materials at the base are typically expensive. Also, don't discount any medium or low odor aroma chemicals, these chemicals provide pleasant aromas when smelling the perfume at a near proximity. And lastly, beware of anosmia during the development of this fragrance, our olfactory can easily become accustomed to these, especially during formulation.

Ultimately, it will be quite difficult to produce a pleasing "nuclear bomb" type of fragrance, but cheers to interest as it will be an excellent learning opportunity for you!

I have been investing a reasonable amount of time investigating projection/longevity and I have a plethora of testers available for assessment purposes.
 

Neua

Basenotes Member
Jun 8, 2022
This is in part and in some degree, one of the challenges of perfuming. Picture the top notes, mid notes, and base notes as a game of "tuggle war". Thus, you need to think about what you are seeking which according to your topic is a nuclear bomb fragrance with projection and longevity. Thus, you are primarily going to be dealing with base notes and perhaps mids, certain powerhouse materials at the top are applicable. IMO, you will want to rule out hedione or IES as they will dampen the aroma in commonly used amounts. Another consideration, you need to be careful with using multiple powerhouse materials at the base as they can drown each other out. The expenditure for the perfume will be quite high as the nice powerhouse materials at the base are typically expensive. Also, don't discount any medium or low odor aroma chemicals, these chemicals provide pleasant aromas when smelling the perfume at a near proximity. And lastly, beware of anosmia during the development of this fragrance, our olfactory can easily become accustomed to these, especially during formulation.

Ultimately, it will be quite difficult to produce a pleasing "nuclear bomb" type of fragrance, but cheers to interest as it will be an excellent learning opportunity for you!

I have been investing a reasonable amount of time investigating projection/longevity and I have a plethora of testers available for assessment purposes.
This is in part and in some degree, one of the challenges of perfuming. Picture the top notes, mid notes, and base notes as a game of "tuggle war". Thus, you need to think about what you are seeking which according to your topic is a nuclear bomb fragrance with projection and longevity. Thus, you are primarily going to be dealing with base notes and perhaps mids, certain powerhouse materials at the top are applicable. IMO, you will want to rule out hedione or IES as they will dampen the aroma in commonly used amounts. Another consideration, you need to be careful with using multiple powerhouse materials at the base as they can drown each other out. The expenditure for the perfume will be quite high as the nice powerhouse materials at the base are typically expensive. Also, don't discount any medium or low odor aroma chemicals, these chemicals provide pleasant aromas when smelling the perfume at a near proximity. And lastly, beware of anosmia during the development of this fragrance, our olfactory can easily become accustomed to these, especially during formulation.

Ultimately, it will be quite difficult to produce a pleasing "nuclear bomb" type of fragrance, but cheers to interest as it will be an excellent learning opportunity for you!

I have been investing a reasonable amount of time investigating projection/longevity and I have a plethora of testers available for assessment purposes.
I am waiting for my evernyl to reach here to try out nuclear accord which has hedione
Ambroxan evernyl and ethyl maltol.
 

Neua

Basenotes Member
Jun 8, 2022
This is in part and in some degree, one of the challenges of perfuming. Picture the top notes, mid notes, and base notes as a game of "tuggle war". Thus, you need to think about what you are seeking which according to your topic is a nuclear bomb fragrance with projection and longevity. Thus, you are primarily going to be dealing with base notes and perhaps mids, certain powerhouse materials at the top are applicable. IMO, you will want to rule out hedione or IES as they will dampen the aroma in commonly used amounts. Another consideration, you need to be careful with using multiple powerhouse materials at the base as they can drown each other out. The expenditure for the perfume will be quite high as the nice powerhouse materials at the base are typically expensive. Also, don't discount any medium or low odor aroma chemicals, these chemicals provide pleasant aromas when smelling the perfume at a near proximity. And lastly, beware of anosmia during the development of this fragrance, our olfactory can easily become accustomed to these, especially during formulation.

Ultimately, it will be quite difficult to produce a pleasing "nuclear bomb" type of fragrance, but cheers to interest as it will be an excellent learning opportunity for you!

I have been investing a reasonable amount of time investigating projection/longevity and I have a plethora of testers available for assessment purposes.

Nah I said 15% not .15g in 50ml
I tried 10% today but it's a faint smell 🤧.I will try it again tomorrow
 

Neua

Basenotes Member
Jun 8, 2022
Should I try ethanol instead of dpg could that be the reason for having no Projection and longevity with javanol from what I have heard javanol is really strong and projects well
 

mnitabach

Basenotes Dependent
Nov 13, 2020
I tried 10% today but it's a faint smell 🤧.I will try it again tomorrow
It's not easy to follow what you're talking about here. But if you're referring to javanol, note that it tends to exhibit very paradoxical properties. Too much of it apparently very quickly & powerfully adapts the olfactory response & you don't smell it at all. Also, many people don't smell santal chemicals very well under the best circumstances. All told, javanol is not a good candidate for underlying any "nuclear" accord.
 

ScentAle

Super Member
Oct 26, 2021
Should I try ethanol instead of dpg could that be the reason for having no Projection and longevity with javanol from what I have heard javanol is really strong and projects well
Javanol is strong because persistent and long lasting dense creamy, but it is also soft when you smell it, smooth and soave. But in the blend is wow, is possible to perceive also small amounts, more than other sandalwoods synthetic.
But like Mike said, I think that for a "nuclear bomb" is not the best candidate.
 

Neua

Basenotes Member
Jun 8, 2022
Thanks for your suggestion guys but I have seen in this forum people talking about javanol and they say people can smell it faraway at 10% dilution so I tried it today and it was easy to create
 

Neua

Basenotes Member
Jun 8, 2022
It's not easy to follow what you're talking about here. But if you're referring to javanol, note that it tends to exhibit very paradoxical properties. Too much of it apparently very quickly & powerfully adapts the olfactory response & you don't smell it at all. Also, many people don't smell santal chemicals very well under the best circumstances. All told, javanol is not a good candidate for underlying any "nuclear" accord.
Ok I will try 1% again and maybe do 3% to recreate molecule 04
 

Jolieo

Basenotes Dependent
Feb 18, 2018
It's ratio. Close to 55% Hedione, 28% Ambroxan, 14% Veramoss, 3% Jasmine, 1% Ethyl Maltol. But of course, this is still rough estimates, need some fine tuning
I made this w/o jasmin- will maybe add later- hasn’t meshed yet- but very strong maltol- to the point of nuttiness
 

Neua

Basenotes Member
Jun 8, 2022
I made this w/o jasmin- will maybe add later- hasn’t meshed yet- but very strong maltol- to the point of nuttiness
Nic I want to try it out too but havent received evernyl yet.

How does it smell ?
Is it projecting and how many hours longevity did you get
 

Jolieo

Basenotes Dependent
Feb 18, 2018
I haven’t put it in ethanol yet - I wait a day to settle- put a tiny bit on @ 100% - and of course lasted hours with moderate projection
i‘ll spray tomorrow and report back
 

Neua

Basenotes Member
Jun 8, 2022
I haven’t put it in ethanol yet - I wait a day to settle- put a tiny bit on @ 100% - and of course lasted hours with moderate projection
i‘ll spray tomorrow and report back
10% on etoh is what I am planning to try when I get my materials
 

Jolieo

Basenotes Dependent
Feb 18, 2018
Put it in ethanol , 10% solution
at first sweet ambox- maltol
diffusive but not huge-
now 3.5 hours later- veramoss and ambrox - more diffuse now- not particularly big - but I know it’s there
didn’t have time to macerate- probably will change- I’ll report back
 
Mar 3, 2022
Put it in ethanol , 10% solution
at first sweet ambox- maltol
diffusive but not huge-
now 3.5 hours later- veramoss and ambrox - more diffuse now- not particularly big - but I know it’s there
didn’t have time to macerate- probably will change- I’ll report back
What % is the maltol in your version?
 

NarcisoM

Super Member
Nov 25, 2019
This base accord is actually pretty modular, so you can mostly do what you want with it. Adding some musk (such as ambrettolide and/or galaxolide) will make it more perfumey, BTW. Anyway, make the four-component accord first & test it out. That will probably inspire you!
Sorry to bring back to life this thread, I made this accord of Evernyl and Oakmoss (half and half)/Hedione/Ambrox/ Maltol. I really love how it smells and how it performs. If you were to add Galaxolide, in which amount would yo do it?
 

NarcisoM

Super Member
Nov 25, 2019
A few days ago, to the building block of Evernyl/Hedione/Ambrox/Ethyl Maltol I added %1.8 of Cashmeran and it was a big game changer. The intense sweetness from the EM was immensely tamed and everything tweaked towards a semi sweet grapefruit. Then, I added a bit of Methyl Pamplemousse and Terpynyl Acetate with a tiny touch o Isoeugenol. Now is a spicy warm grapefruit, you can smell the sweetness in the background, but the scent now is far from the intense sweetness from the original building block.
 

mnitabach

Basenotes Dependent
Nov 13, 2020
A few days ago, to the building block of Evernyl/Hedione/Ambrox/Ethyl Maltol I added %1.8 of Cashmeran and it was a big game changer. The intense sweetness from the EM was immensely tamed and everything tweaked towards a semi sweet grapefruit. Then, I added a bit of Methyl Pamplemousse and Terpynyl Acetate with a tiny touch o Isoeugenol. Now is a spicy warm grapefruit, you can smell the sweetness in the background, but the scent now is far from the intense sweetness from the original building block.
Cool!
 

Latest News

Top