New Smelly Game Proposal

Geco

Well-known member
Jun 14, 2015
thanks to all 3 judges who have put their judgments so far, for their commitment and their usefulness to us. I wait for the end of the game to give thanks.
 

Bavard

Wearing Perfume Right Now
Moderator
Basenotes Plus
Jul 20, 2015
I apologize for the tardiness, I was in a car accident. I'd still like to submit if possible. If I am allowed, I will send my bottles this weekend or Monday the latest.

Thanks,

Habibi

A little service info to the judges:
As I've had a lot on my plate lately, I haven't gotten around to shipping, despite having paid for it. My apologies.
I'm still going to send you all a sample, but I don't expect you to give me any feedback. I just hope you will find it interesting to smell. Or if you don't bother, I won't blame you if you just toss it.

I'm still holding out hope for these two shipments.
 

HabibiGotIt

Well-known member
Apr 9, 2020
Awww man, you flatter me. I've been absent from the forum for a while. Life has been, um, crazy.

I did make something but I just couldn't get it in the mail and felt bad asking anyone to judge it late. I also just couldn't come up with a brief because I was distracted by work and life.

I'll participate in the next game. I did feel bad about missing this one. I'll try to go back and read the Judge's reviews. Thx.
 

benjwi02

Well-known member
Oct 8, 2018
I was so used to using the Tapatalk app that I didn't know the site was back up!! I had judged the perfumes and was ready to post last week!

Thank you for your patience, to the five submissions. Overall, even though a small turnout for this game, I am quite impressed with all of the perfumes that were submitted. Every single one of you should be proud of your creation! I didn't go *too* deep on feedback, and kept it more general. But, if you want specific feedback, feel free to email me at benjwi02@luther.edu. I most immediately reply there, so if you want quick feedback, that is where you can contact me. You can also feel free to private message me on basenotes, but I am not checking it too frequently these days so it may take some time for me to respond.

Have Book Will Travel- xii

Blind: Smells to me of a fruity floral with a very clean “sheen” to it. It also seems to be backed by some sweetness, a little powdery and a little wood as well. If I had to guess, there would be notes like linden blossom, honey, rose, sandalwood, maybe cedar. If I had to guess, there also might be a chunk of musk involved to give the clean, almost metallic effect. Overall, I like the first impressions.



Factual: So, the “cedar” I was smelling is definitely the frankincense and oud in combination with the other aspects of the perfume. I love the inspiration! I myself am a big “Expanse” fan, and I love the way that the clean “space” feeling was employed. I can almost smell the adventures that Miller went through on Ceres.



Creative direction: I think you did a great job with the direction of the perfume, capturing the image, memory, location in your head and making it into a smell. I think that the clean and “space”-y aspect could be brought down a touch and you could still achieve the same effect. Additionally, the honeyed notes might also come down a touch. But, these are very picky and personal preference-based observations. Once again, nicely done.



Osmanthus and the Moon- Pinkster

Blind: My first impressions are of a greenhouse of green, shiny plants, although it doesn’t smell super close to this at all. This smells like it is coming from something green, like stemone or another green leafy material. I get a very clean osmanthus a little as well, and maybe a vague background of woods.



Factual: Firstly, I love the delivery with the written poem and the lovely cursive—I have horrible handwriting so props haha. As for the perfume, I did get the osmanthus note and the tea as well, in combination with the green mandarin. However, I do not get the oud very much. The musk works nicely with the elements mentioned already. The perfume does a good job of giving the “moonlight” imagery evoked by the poem, so well done with that element.



Creative direction: It sort of smells earthy, green, sharp, slightly citrus in the opening. I think that the opening sharpness of the green and clean is a tad too dominant. I think trying to balance it out with other ingredients might help to calm that down. Some ingredients to consider testing are top note salicylates, koavone for a little warmth, maybe even a slight honey nuance(just a touch). The opening quickly calms down to a place that I quite enjoy. It smells a bit like some osmanthus black tea I have right now. I think that the oud/frankincense could be brought out a touch, or other warmth/woody ingredients could also help. The general takeaway for advice would be to blend the fruity floral and clean crisp notes with other woods by spiking the woody warmth a little. This could potentially be done with high g-isomer iso e super. It is in a really great spot though and you should be proud! Nicely done.



Rive Loire—Geco

Blind: There are two immediate thoughts that come to mind when smelling this—slight hints of Creed Viking and hints of one of the perfumes from the last game, although I don’t remember if the perfume from the last game was Geco’s or not. It smells lovely, overall. Clean, citrus, spice, wood, sweet, a touch floral. It is definitely more modern but not at all cloying or uninteresting. I can’t discern many notes individually, which isn’t necessarily a good or bad thing, rather just an observation.



I did not find a description with this perfume in the packaging or in the designated post, so I don’t really know how well the perfume connects to the brief, or if there is one that was meant to get to me.



Creative direction: I think that all the right materials have been chosen for the perfume, which is 80% of the battle. Now, it is just about blending. The perfume is already blended pretty well, but I would still push Geco to go that extra 1% to try and make it absolutely unified. It is already 99% of the way there, and smells great! Additionally, if the perfume from the last game that smells similar to this one is yours, I would encourage you to branch out with what ingredients you use. Not only will it challenge you as a creative, but once you learn how to use more and different ingredients properly, it opens your world to an incredible amount of directions to take with your perfumes.



Syros—Ferntim

Blind: Immediately fig. Right out of the gate. There is a bit of a clean element as well, maybe pink grapefruit. There is also a slightly smoky vanilla and wood background. It is unusual as far as perfumes go, as the fig is super forward in the formula and is more dense than most fig notes I have smelled before. It smells very lovely, but I would sooner make this into a candle for a living space than wear as a perfume.



Factual: I named some of the notes, but didn’t catch the others on my blind smell. I do get a little spice upon smelling more, but not much sea salt or musk. I do get the immortelle/floral note, and it accompanies the fig nicely. The brief matches up with the perfume and does evoke some sense of Ferntim’s memory of Syros in my mind. And now I want to go there. Thanks a LOT. J



Creative direction: Based off of your memory of the place, I think that the fig is too heavy, especially the stemone. I think stemone is crucial to the fig note, but I think it pops through the texture too much in the very beginning, and sort of dulled my first impression. But it soon dried down into a nice, full perfume. Additionally, I would like to smell a touch more sea salt. In my mind’s image of your description, I envisioned a saltiness that would work well with the fig, but don’t get all that much of it, just a touch. Consider taking a look at floralozone, maritima(just a touch or itll smell like a brine fest), and cyclohexyl ethyl alcohol for the saltiness/aqua. I have more suggestions for “salt” where that came from, so feel free to ask. Additionally, the fruitiness of the fig might be dulling the dryness of the perfume, which I was also looking for considering the brief. I did get a little dryness, but I think even a touch more would benefit the perfume. Consider methyl cedryl ketone to try this out. If these adjustments are made, I would absolutely wear this as a perfume. My main feedback is just a little too much fig, and the others are nitpicky extras. Great perfume and great job!



Mael—Marlaney

Blind: Immediately, I get lavender/coumarinic nuances, vanilla, methyl cedryl ketone or something similar, and a sweet tart-like candy note. I think that this is likely due to some fruity-vanilla combination, along with a powderiness that sometimes comes from lavender/coumarin types. This could also be from some influence of heliotrope. There is some woodiness popping out from the background, as well.



Factual: Overall, there are many elements that match the brief and a couple smaller elements that don’t. The apple note ended up being pretty candy-like, which the description does agree with. I personally think that it is leaning too much candy and not enough apple. I get some rose, which is listed, but I sooner get lavender and heliotropex N, which aren’t listed in the notes of the perfume, and I would interpret that those are supposed to be gorse(haven’t smelled before, unfortunately) and damp earth. I do get the vanilla/amber/woodiness of the aged lumber and dry planks, as well as a touch of the booze casks. Overall, it matches the brief but could match the brief a bit better!



Creative direction: As I stated earlier, the sweet notes of the perfume are combining with the top fruity notes to make it a bit more apple candy than true apple. If this is your intention, then keep it as is! I personally would like a little more crisp, fresh apple. I can’t say what gorse smells like, but there is definitely a chunk of lavender and heliotropex in there that dominates the florals: I don’t mind this! I just can’t comment on the accuracy to gorse. The sweetness from the heliotropex could potentially be making the apple note smell more candy like, but you would have to test variations to confirm this. As for the booze casks, I could still get a bit more of a booze note to the current sweet wood background. If you are trying to make it more of an abstract picture of Mael Duin, then I think the only thing I would change is the candy to fruity. But if you want a bit more detail, then I would try adding a bit more booziness, and even a bit more rose, since that is a listed note and lavender isn’t. Overall, besides the initial top note candy, I think you did a wonderful job! J
 

Jolieo

Well-known member
Feb 18, 2018
Amazing review! Bravo, I thoroughly enjoyed reading it !
of course Kudos to the perfumers , sounds like everyone hit their mark!
 

Ferntim

Well-known member
Apr 14, 2020
Thanks so much for those reviews, great suggestions, loved it! I reduced the sea salt accord (salicylates, cascalone, vetiver, etc) bit by bit because I felt like it was overpowering the fig accord. I will try to rebalance it.
 

benjwi02

Well-known member
Oct 8, 2018
Thanks so much for those reviews, great suggestions, loved it! I reduced the sea salt accord (salicylates, cascalone, vetiver, etc) bit by bit because I felt like it was overpowering the fig accord. I will try to rebalance it.
I am glad you enjoyed the review! Looking forward to the next game. I would strongly consider adding some additional ingredients to achieve the saltwater. I have found Cyclohexyl ethyl alcohol and helional to be invaluable in oceanic accords. Maritima can be used for some realism, and floralozone for some additional ozonic (and borderline salty) qualities.
 

xii

Well-known member
Jun 9, 2015
There might be no reviews from the remaining two judges so I‘d like to commend the exceptionally good job of Bavard, benjwi02 and fragrantregard. It’s a rare occasion to have someone really competent so diligently evaluate hobby fragrances. I hope more people appreciate the opportunity in the future games.

Congratulations to all the participants! Unintentionally, the theme turn out to be difficult, as it was vague and so much freedom might have resulted in indecision rather than firm ideas. From the reviews I got an impression our hobby community is maturing rapidly which is a reassuring thought.
 

perfumum

Well-known member
Jun 28, 2016
Sorry all for the delay - in the end I only received 3 samples in the post but have been wearing them for the last few days and finally feel that I can make some comments. I have deliberately not been reading this thread or the other judge's comments.

SYROS by ferntim
Brief:
Very lovely descriptions of the Greek island of Syros🇬🇷. The poetry of your final paragraph, with the phrasing of thoughts forming and dissolving was particularly joyful to read. καλα εκανες!

Blind smelling without looking at name, formula, or ingredients if present:
Initial impressions: something toasted 🍞caramelic🍮/pyrazine🌰, something ozone/marine/salty🌊. Underwater bakery, with some sort of spice. With a chunk of stemone.🟢

Post ingredients/notes perusal:
I think the idea here is nice, but one or two of the ingredients bring it down a little. In particular, I think your immortelle 🧛‍♂️is adding a peculiar caramelized part which, considering it contains sotolone🍛, makes the initial impression a bit clashy with the green stemone.

That said the saltiness of this is spot on and that was the first thing I thought of: salty figs! The accord you have set up with the Cedarwood✏️ Virginian definitely works. Personally I didn't get a grapefruit note.
In terms of improvements, I would suggest eliminating the immortelle (or switching to a Helichyrsum eo which tends to be less sickly). You could also sub in boronal with its caramelised but co-mingling floral tendencies which would exalt rather than detract. Talking of florals, I would be inclined to push in the direction of Phylosykos with some more muguet materials if not present already: lilybelle, florol and Hivernal neo would be adequately fresh👌. The vanilla may also be worth removing. For a more compatible sweetness maybe select a mandarin🍊, valencene or alpha sinensal instead - adding vanilla to marine or green things is always a risk and these sweet citruses (particularly the folded mandarin) might take the bitterness away from the stemone without throwing the composition off.

The longevity of this formula is good so you have evidently studies how it dries down - so well done on that part for sure.:cool:

I'd be happy to make some more detailed suggestions either in private or public with the formula, let me know.
 
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perfumum

Well-known member
Jun 28, 2016
Have Book Will Travel by Xii
Brief:
Transition is a great book, so I totally get your sentiments about being simultaneously grounded and somewhere else entirely. This is a nice premise on which to rest a perfume.

Blind smelling without looking at name, formula, or ingredients if present:
Initial impressions: Dentist?😷🦷
Honestly, this smells like some sort of UV-cured dental resin when you have to rinse your mouth out after a filling with that cup of blue liquid. There is something phenolic, cresylic and "synthetic" or polymerised and then a floral part. The floral part smells a bit like a cheap Kirsch/cherry flavour🍒 where the benzaldehyde sticks out. Above this there is something methyl salicylate, like a mouthwash, and I think this is the dentist impression. 💉

Post ingredients/notes perusal:
To be totally brutally honest I found this very unpleasant and without balance. That said, it seems you are going for this simultaneous impression so in one sense this cannot be faulted: it smells like an electrical substation fire and flowers in a dental office reception all at once. ;)
However, I think a few of the ingredients overpower and detract from your aims. You mention wintergreen: I have only successfully used this oil once in a tuberose accord, and that was at 0.1%. I don't know what dosage you here but in my opinion it is 10x too much.

You discuss the linden blossom accord as being idealised but then list a few naturals that don't really fit in it so I would suggest building this in a more lifelike way if you can. That way you have something hyper-realistic to counterpoint with your imaginary odour. The Mimosa abs does fit, as does the honey🍯 (assuming you mean Honey Signature - the Hermitage honey abs which used to be sold is practically odourless and for flavours). I would actually build your linden around alpha terpineol, undecavertol🚰, Florosa 🌸 and leaf acetal (very important there🌿). You could add some other muguet materials too, and violet nitrile.

Then I would bridge to your dead robot space station part; your Iain Banks with your Iain M Banks. Firstly, consider para cresol🐎 and para cresyl pivalate as liminal, between natural and mineral. 4-ethyl phenol, 4-ethyl octanoic acid🐐, Ethyl 10 undecenoate 🕯️would all work here. Ascending by sky elevator perhaps, you can then introduce more saffrony or metallic materials. Leather carbonate would work very well considering its rosy aspects, safraleine, rose oxide🌹, actual safranal in traces. Than a slug of oud or cypriol for naturalism🪵. If you like the impression it gives, try Aldambre+habanolide in a ratio of about 1:20. Other alien materials: Floralozone a la Spacewood, Xylenols, Florhydral and so on.

Linden is also a bit spicy so try some eugenol in there (eg. 0.5%).
This idea has extraordinary potential, I just think that it becomes almost pointless to put nice floral absolutes (You mention rose and jasmine sambac) or oils (sandalwood) because they get lost in the salicylate storm. In this case as I mentioned I would say delete any methyl salicylate containing perpetrators and instead do some lovely plastick-y cyclohexyl salicyate.

I would also maybe say remove the cardamom: I know you are going for something spiritual and cleansing but remember that cardamom gets most of its oomph from eucalyptol, which makes the clinical hospital linoleum impression worse. 🏥

This is interesting work, but I think it needs more clarity and wearability to go from museum piece to perfume piece.(y)

I'd be happy to make some more detailed suggestions either in private or public with the formula, let me know.
 
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perfumum

Well-known member
Jun 28, 2016
Rive Loire by Geco
Brief:
I'm sorry if I lost it, but I don't seem to have any accompanying documents or stories with this one. Would you send it by PM and I will sniff-in-context?

Blind smelling without looking at name, formula, or ingredients if present:
Initial impressions: Ooh, very elegant. Piquant peppers, citruses🍋 with a very pleasant Tom Fordian patchouli🍃. This is up my street

Post ingredients/notes perusal:
There were no ingredients listed or documentation.
This is very balanced and well blended, potentially to a fault in that it doesn't change a huge amount. Strength is good but It could be a little more at the beginning.
As things dry down, a wonderful dusty sandalwood stalk emerges from a handful 👐of pink peppercorns. You have masterfully deployed Aldehyde C12 MNA here to my nose: just enough to bring good lift but not too much to make things soapy🧼. This may still be a bit soapy to some people however so you could decrease it. There is also a bitter citrus facet, I would guess bergamot and maybe petitgrain.

I assume the dustiness is coming from cedar materials. There is also a cistus part, maybe even hydrocarboresine. I would personally reduce the latter if it is there. You could also switch it to Ciste abs SEV which is less smoky and more incense so might fit better here.⛪

As is often the sign of something good, I can't pick out many other parts of this composition. Although I am probably partly influenced by judging completely blind without any context as with the other entries. 👀

I'd be happy to make some more detailed suggestions either in private or public with the formula, let me know.
 

perfumum

Well-known member
Jun 28, 2016
Máel by Marlaney
Brief:
Although I'm half irish, I hadn't heard of this story so it was nice to read. The contrast you set up between child🧒 and adulthood extends into the fragrance with the huge gourmand vs woody boozy🥃 elements, so that is crafty

Blind smelling without looking at name, formula, or ingredients if present:
Initial impressions: Lush store!🛀 I get an effervescent overflowing of lemon, fruits and sherbet. There is something that bothers me about the lemon or phenoxanol feeling, almost a sickly sweetness. I had this impression when I added too much of a heliotrope note to citrus so we shall see if that is the case here.

Post ingredients/notes perusal:
OK so I expected a big dose of a lemon oil but you have some 0.8% citral instead - this ingredient often reminds me of Lush bath bombs for some reason.😁

This is a longish formula in my books - around 40 materials not including bases 📃.
You have a wonderful harmony in the initial spray where your cis-3-hexenyl acetate and citral sing together. I don't actually get apples🍏: I get lemon cheesecake🍰, but the gourmand fruitiness is there. I think I would work on making your fragrance less literal in general. For example, you have a lot of aspects and bases which, even though I'm sure they smell lovely or could be great in a more simple fragrance, distract from your apples and steer the journey away from the mythical to the quotidian.

For example, Lavender does not really fit here (even if it is the nice one I sent you 😜 ) especially at 5%: it effectively prevents the brain from going to fruits. The jasmine base and precyclemone B I am inclined to say the same. I think the precyclemone is in theory a good idea for your ozonic breezes but in reality is too functional so just takes us to Sudsbury.

For your apple🍎, the muguet does fit, maybe at a lower dose. Fructalate and fructone both fine, though I would add some fruity carboxylate and hexyl acetate (1-2%) to make it more present. Delete❌ the dihydrolinalol (not doing anything beyond the linalol here) and actually maybe switch all linalol containing elements incl lavender to just 5-10% ethyl linalol for a clean longlasting freshness which won't turn your apples to pears or worse. The manzanate and alpha damascone touches are well dosed, so well done!(y) Although aquamate/marine formate is listed as sort of apples and marine I find that these rarely actually make themselves known in the composition so you could delete that (or make it 10%)🌲

I think your vanilla heliotrope block is very big - 7% vanillin is gargantuan. You also probably have some in your amber base. Remember that with vanillin, above about 2.5% in the formula doesn't usually bring any additional sweetness, just cloyingness. This is an effect of our receptors and odour detection thresholds more than anything. If you do want that level of sweetness, I would suggest ethyl vanillin (~2%) + ultravanil (0.05%). The Heliotropex N at the same dose is a similar issue, but in this case I think this base contains Veratraldehyde which is known for being sickly at higher concentrations. In any case heliotropin does this as well. In one sense I like what these two bring: a lovely unarguable opacity and thick creaminess🍦. On the other hand, this obscures almost everything underneath. To keep the opacity, you will probably find you only need 1% heliotropin. Then you *could* add in a lot of musks, especially muscenone🦌, for a beguiling veil in the centre of your perfume. It could become like a Cologne Indelible with apples. But really I think pushing the woods (Iso E, Vetiver, woody ambers) will be more fruitful so to speak. In this way you get the proper feeling of wooden planks. One fragrance to look at here might be Black Phantom: Vetiver terpenes + vetiveryl acetate + brazilian vetiver provide the nutty woodiness, and sensible overdoses (if that is a phrase) of ethyl vanillin and ethyl maltol the calories🍭. Vertofix push to 10% or more and see. Your rum you could push to the top, and morph it to Whisky which in any case is more Irish (in this case do gamma octalactone, a natural rum, caramel acetate and coffee furanone for an accord that mainly comes in before the apples). In the Kilian line of thought check out their Apple Brandy, actually.

Finally, I would remove the Ald C9 (too fatty and soapy), Ylang (lisylang) and acetophenone as they stick out to me (although ylang almost always does, so that may be my fault)

This has a lot of potential so well done! The longevity and projection is phenomenal. Go n-eirí an t-ádh leat 😊
 

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