NEW: La Collection Celine Haute Parfumerie

imm0rtelle

Well-known member
Apr 2, 2021
I just wore my original bottle of Eau Noire today and ya know what, it's not that great! Actually too spicy for me.
I recoiled in disgust when I smelled the perfumed air in the glass cloche that was encasing Hedi's 30 Montaigne candle a few months back. The spiciness threw me off, but a part of me is curious how it smells when lit. Eau Noire really is polarizing, I kind of like that facet of it. I like to consider it as a very arrogant scent as a result.

The spicy facets really feels like a dated concept of luxury when the whole "Eurabic" aesthetic was what "expensive" smelled like.
 

mr. reasonable

Well-known member
Jan 1, 2009
I briefly tried Black Tie, Nightclubbing, Reptile & the Cologne one.

I bought Reptile. It reminds me of something . . . seems quietly, understated elegant FWIW. Enjoy it a lot - not a statement perfume, just good stuff.

Black Tie seems quite nice but not for me - a bit predictable, Nightclubbing made no impression at all, the Cologne is a nice Fleurs d'Oranger thing but I have APOM PH and, frankly I don't go for Fd'O much anyway - apart from Seville de lAube, which is understated and has some edgy lavender and African small animal poo in it (Costus?) which gives it a distinct personality :)

I'll revisit BT & Nightclubbing at some point.

Also sniffed 2 of the more overtly 'femme' ones - St. Germain & Dan Paris - both nice.
 

Nom de Guerre

Well-known member
Jan 2, 2020
Well, that's a bummer:

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imm0rtelle

Well-known member
Apr 2, 2021
Does it smell anything like Eau Noire? An updated take on lavender under Hedi's direction would be welcome! Not to mention I'm almost certain FK is making these too.
I would be shocked if it smelled like Eau Noire since that just doesn't fit into Hedi's Celine narrative. It would stick out like a sore thumb and destroy the whole cohesiveness of the Celine Haute Parfumerie line. I can accept that from other brands with a weak creative direction/vision, as it might "open up" the line to appeal more to the Middle Eastern client and help the brand make more money, but it would be disappointing from Hedi since he prides himself in making sure everything fits perfectly, even if it means not accommodating everyone.

I bought Reptile. It reminds me of something . . . seems quietly, understated elegant FWIW. Enjoy it a lot - not a statement perfume, just good stuff.
The opening and mid really smells like the olfactory equivalent of a black and glittering olfactory kaleidoscope. The late drydown was primarily airy, dry, peppery/spicy, and woods. I get the comparison between Reptile and Poivre Samarcande.
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I agree with you about that feeling of understated elegance, and I think it applies to the entire line. In comparison to the rest of the line up, it is probably the statement piece of the collection. Reptile is probably the most masculine-leaning in the line up. I feel like Hedi's Celine fragrances are ethereal, diaphanous, minimalistic, softer, rounder and unisex feminine-leaning, in general. I wish I had more context with other fragrance lines that Celine positions itself alongside of, and how different and similar they are.

Black Tie seems quite nice but not for me - a bit predictable
Black Tie was the last fragrance I added to my wardrobe from the original lineup of 9 fragrances. It caused significant olfactory fatigue for my nose when I wore it on my collar bones, and overall was a very underwhelming experience. It wasn't until I tried a different spray routine when I wore it outside, that I began to see its beauty. The more I caught whiffs of it, the more addicted I became. That sealed the deal for me.

Nightclubbing made no impression at all,
The cigarette/nicotine facet is definitely my favourite part of Nightclubbing. I wouldn't mind a short-lived fragrance that focused on only that part of the fragrance. Cigarette smoke has very sexy associations to me in my mind.

the Cologne is a nice Fleurs d'Oranger thing but I have APOM PH and, frankly I don't go for Fd'O much anyway
I'm a bit surprised at this connection. Although I've never smelled either of the fragrances you mentioned, I looked them up briefly and it is definitely not something I expected to be associated with Cologne Française. I really don't get any citrusy facets in Cologne Française.

Fig fruit and fig tree is what I predominantly get, with the smokey tree facet, along with the earthy facets of orris butter, being more of the main player and the fruity fig being more of a supporting player. It is airy, but still has some heft. There is a tasteful subtle fruitiness from the fig, smokey woods, very slight bitterness, orris butter, slight earthy facet, addictive quality, and an almost shimmering feeling and overall not what you would expect since it has the cologne in its name. It isn't bright, extroverted, and citrusy like what you expect from colognes. It has a more introverted, brooding, insouciant attitude, but still youthful elegant character. It smells of "good taste" and elegance, but there is still a slight subtle edgy side to Cologne Française. I don't get much powdery facets, instead I get more creamy facets. This was the one that was love at first sniff for me when I first went to check out the line in the stores.

Also sniffed 2 of the more overtly 'femme' ones - St. Germain & Dan Paris - both nice.
Saint-Germain-des-Prés is one fragrance that I went a full 180 degrees turn on. It was initially a scrubber for me, but the more I wore it, the more I fell in love with it, and eventually added it to my wardobe. I agree with you that it definitely leans feminine, even the SA was a bit shocked when I went in to buy that one for myself. It reminded me too much of Cologne Blanche's drydown, my 10/10 holy grail, and I had to have it. The "des-Prés" part refers to meadows, and I definitely get that green facet in the opening of the fragrance. Hedi envisioned it capturing the smell of the Jardin du Luxembourg.

Dans Paris smells nice, but it didn't resonate with me no matter how many times I wore it. It has too much of a "good guy" quality to it, and I much prefer it coming off a girl instead. One of the SAs wears this and it is truly a perfect fit for her.
 
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imm0rtelle

Well-known member
Apr 2, 2021
Snippets of interviews where Hedi talks about something called "Old England" cologne.

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Since Hedi loves the amber colour so much, I'm a bit surprised he opted to colour Rimbaud pale rosey-grey instead. It stands out from the colour scheme used for the rest of the line.
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Seems like it is discontinued, but I couldn't find anything about it with my brief google search. The closest I found was English Lavender by Yardley. Hedi doesn't describe what "Old England" smells like, so this is all just guesses. Any connection made is with my tinfoil hat on. He talks about old-fashioned soap, and Yardley is also famous for soaps. Yardley has an aristocratic history and connection that I think might appeal to Hedi. The French liked borrowing from the English, especially in the 60s and 70s, so it also doesn't feel out of character. But again, all of this is baseless speculation.

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Reviews on vintage bottles of this scent:
This is a composition that brings out the exotic element of lavender. I think when we say it's "unisex", we're picking up on the unexpected scope of the fragrance. It's feminine, yet masculine. It's calming enough to wear to bed, but uplifting enough to wear in daytime. It reminds us of the countryside, but it has an aromatic aspect that feels brewed, concocted by human hands.

I love the tonka bean; it may be what some people think is the powdery element, but in my botte, along with the gorgeous real oakmoss, it's creamy.

I have a vintage bottle in a vintage box that is still called English Lavender "Water", not "perfume". The bergamot is pleasantly detectable in mine, although I'm inclined to notice because I burn bergamot oil in my home. The rosemary isn't as evident, I don't detect it, unless it's what I thought was clary sage. (Update: just after a shower - it's evident).

I don't think the aroma itself is outdated; the only old-fashioned aspect lies in the composition. There is a *way* that it's been done that sets it apart from newer fragrances. Is it that Yardley's English Lavender was based on no existing scent? So many perfumes now are inspired by. . . other perfumes! I suppose we might never know what the perfumeur had in mind.

This is a scent that can be worn any time of the year. I enjoy wearing it mid-winter in Canada.

English Lavender by Yardley's of London feels healthy. It is a joy to apply it three hours before sleeping, then once again before bed. I expect to wear it in the daytime more this spring. It would be nice to have a lotion to layer.

Update: I applied my Aromaforce essential oil of lavender to my hair and the inside of my ebows, then splashed YEL onto my wrist and neck. I was upstairs doing this when my boyfriend called from downstairs, "what smells so good?"

English Lavender brings back so many fond memories. This was the fragrance that permeated the air in my old family home, owned by my father and mother, in the state where I was born Alabama. I' ma baby boomer and was born to a military wife. My father had served in both WW II and Korea. My mother, a home economist, was crazy about lavender. She kept lavender bath soap, lavender shower soap, lavender hand soap, lavender air freshener and lavender shampoo. There was lavender growing just outside the house, along with other purple flowers that seemed (to my then untrained eye) the same: violet, heliotrope, iris, thyme, rosemary. This is what Yardley Old English Lavender reminds me of. It's my mother's garden of purple flowers.

An evergreen scent, with eucalyptus and cedar, a woodsy outdoor aroma, herbal, bucolic and romantic. It's like a 19th century Impressionist painting of a little garden with lavender. The lavender note is the big note but she is sweetened with minty rosemary, sage, and greenery all around: eucalyptus and oak moss. The green dry down is like fresh fallen autumn leaves. The lavender note is soapy and wrapped up win green leaves. It's like picking up lavender in lavender fields and taking it back to your country cottage to make it into soap. It has a kind of Amish or Mennonite air. The people who make their own everything - construct their own houses, churn their own butter and make their own bars of soap.

As the previous reviewer correctly observed, it has an early American air, as in 1700's era colonial homestead not in a town but just outside of the town next to the forest. The country air is bottled up in this fragrance. Lavender, rosemary, geranium, cedar, evergreen foliage, sage, lichen, and hand-made herbal soap. It's unisex as most florals and greens are unisex so men folk can wear this too despite it having a feminine association. I can see why they would call it English Lavender because the fresh and clean scent is reminiscent of English lady soap from bygone days. A women of questionable virtue would have worn strong perfume but a decent lady would smell only of clean soap. This is highly conservative and straightforward as a floral green scent.

Yardley English Lavender is a reformulation of the original fragrance which has been selling since the early 20th century but which can now be bought at a ridiculously low price of about 15-20 bucks (a drugstore cheapie) online. This is a domestic fragrance and I don't wear it out in public. This is aroma therapy for me. I love to wear it in my home on Sunday mornings after my shower. Lavender is a clean after shower skin freshener scent. Sillage is not great and it sits close to the skin and doesn't project. The longevity is also pretty disappointing as it lasts only a short time before it dries into a spicy nutmeg or wood and then poof nothing. But it's a wonderful and classic floral fragrance a true vintage and a beautiful lavender.

*This is a review of the vintage English Lavender.

English Lavender opens with an aromatic airy and slightly camphorous lavender and citric bergamot tandem with a sharp supporting cedarwood undertone. As the composition reaches its early heart the bergamot vacates, leaving the staring aromatic camphorous lavender and supporting sharp natural smelling cedar initially by themselves, before gradually adding in herbaceous, leathery clary sage as the composition moves though its heart. During the late dry-down the lavender eschews its aromatic facet and cedarwood support as it turns mildly powdery, joined by moderately animalic musk through the finish. Projection is below average, as is longevity at 5-6 hours on skin.

English Lavender (vintage) is a composition I was exposed to as a child nearly forty years ago. The composition was quite common back then in stores everywhere, also finding its way into soaps and other toiletries. While memory can be quite tricky when looking back on a period of nearly 40 years, I distinctly remember it leaving an indelible positive impression with its very recognizable signature. Fast forward to present time, after many years of passing over buying a bottle of the vintage juice it was time to go down memory lane and make the purchase to see if those positive memories still held so many years later. Wearing English Lavender on skin as I write this, I can definitely confirm that while different smelling than I remember, the composition still is quite distinctive and impressive, only adding unexpected sharp natural cedarwood to the mix. In truth, there really isn't much to English Lavender's composition structure. It is a relatively simplistic concoction, but what sets it apart from the competition is its near-perfect execution and very solid raw material quality. Who would have thought this was a drug store fragrance? On the negative side of the equation are the relatively poor performance metrics. I don't know officially if the composition was an EdT or an EdC, but I would wager an EdC, as it has a light airy structure with relatively poor longevity. Whatever it is, it smells darn good and is still dirt cheap in relative terms on the aftermarket making even a blind buy a real low-risk possibility. The bottom line is vintage Yardley English Lavender smells different than I remember it with more of a cedar component, but the end result doesn't disappoint, earning it a "very good" 3.5 stars out of 5 rating and a solid recommendation.

By @Varanis Ridari:
Yardley has a storied history often forgotten due to mass-market sprawl the venerable English perfumer experienced in the late 20th century, leading to numerous acquisitions when the company finally tanked after 220+ years as a family-owned operation. The big one that put the perfumer on the map and earned it no less than 5 royal warrants over the years was English Lavender, a key creation that is as it sounds: a fresh scent based mostly around the lavender that grew along the English countryside. Over the years, the stuff became beloved by both men and women alike, even if after the turn of the 20th century it was marketed only to women. During Victorian times, this was just as likely to be adorning a dandy as a damsel, but after realizing that special "for men" scents were needed to bring in the larger population of less psycho-emotionally secure men existing abroad, the UK perfumers just re-dubbed this a women's perfume. At some point after the latest acquisition by Lornamead, the venerable scent was re-orchestrated entirely to finally reflect that dedicated femme direction sometime after 2012, but this ended up backfiring in it's home country of the UK, where the original was re-dubbed "Original English Lavender". Currently, the UK is the only place where the actual 1873 unisex classic is sold, outside of websites that import it, and everywhere else in the world sells only the female-aimed re-orchestrated "English Lavender". This review covers both, as they are both very similar and separated only by a few additional heart and base notes not found in the newer version to make it more airy and thus palatable to the stereotypical feminine tastes it shoots for. I think all this does is make the re-orchestration version an even better choice for before-bed use than the original, which is better day wear since it has the beefier Victorian-era proto-fougère base.

I say "proto-fougère" for English Lavender, because like Caswell-Massey Jockey Club (1840), and Trumper's Wild Fern (1877), the scent predates the namesake fragrance of Fougère Royale (1882) by a few years, but otherwise it is the classic barbershop paradigm that defines the style. The younger femme version of this does veer slightly more into chypre territory thanks to it's drier and lighter base arrangements that switch out the fougère base for Iso-E super wood note, patchouli, oakmoss, and vanilla. Otherwise, both scents have bergamot and clary sage in the opening, with the original being boosted by neroli and lavender leaf to make it more abstract and less directly-floral. The heart for both scents equally is based around lavender (the star of the show of course), eucalyptus, and geranium, which are super-classic barbershop combos by today's standard. The original scent factors in rosemary to make it a bit meatier and greener, while the newer iteration stays floral longer with jasmine, chamomile, and violet. From here, the biggest difference in transition occurs between original and new, as the original moves towards that classic tonka, musk, and sandalwood base, becoming more like a sweet, rich, comfort scent great after a shave. The newer version moves to the subtle dry vanilla, synthetic wood, and patchouli, which doesn't have nearly the same weight or projection, but helps preserve the feeling of the lavender much longer, so ironically is more like it's actual namesake than the older design. Frank Sinatra famously loved Yardley English Lavender and would never travel anywhere without the soap and fragrance on his person somewhere, so if the late "Chairman of the Board" liked it so exclusively, that's a pretty strong indicator of it's design quality, but I don't think he ever smelled the newer iteration.

If you love the calming affects of natural lavender products like stress balls, soaps, room sprays, and the like, the reform is what you want to spritz on after a shower to melt away in tranquil lavender, chamomile, and dry vanilla. If you're looking for a gender-neutral day wear scent that recalls pleasant strolls down high street in the late 19th century, and can go toe-to-toe with any of the above aforementioned classics, then the original is the preferred format, but expect insane shipping outside of the UK. I am a sucker for lavender so alongside my other stiff powdery old fougères this goes, and a bottle of the newer stuff for bedtime. It's pretty clearcut and fans of Aqua Lavanda Puig (1940) or Atkinson's English Lavender (1910) owe it to themselves to see what the hubbub is all about, since this is the one that arguably started it all (if we're talking the original stuff). Longevity is better on the older version but sillage isn't great on either one of these because they are just simple lavender-forward florals at the end of the day, and aren't meant to withstand intense cold or high heat, nor get through a grueling workday, so consider these as a before or after your main wear choice for those who like to switch out. For everyone else, carrying the bottle may be needed, but the economical nature of these (outside international shipping on the UK-only original) means you can spray away without worry of scarcity. There isn't much more to say here about these. I am a bit mad that they had to make the historical original version so hard to find outside of Yardley's home turf, but other than that, Yardley English Lavender in either iteration is a great buddy for the commonly-found soap (which uses the original formula but is ironically available globally). You won't get compliments nor will be making a statement with the stuff, but I don't think that is the point of Yardley English Lavender, if it ever was.

vs one known review of Rimbaud:
Rimbaud: Crystal-Lavender

In Eau Noire, Hedi had already explored his affection for lavender, but through a hot and dry prism, the latter being supported by immortelle and cistus, and always accompanied by an iris frame. In Rimbaud, we find exactly this same lavender-iris frame, but here it is worked with great finesse and transparency, all in elegance. I think of Jersey, because they are quite close, but Rimbaud is clearer, more limpid, more crystalline. The iris slides naturally over a fine lavender with accents of fresh thyme, red fruits and fresh flowers, notes of light wood draw it naturally towards a base which is draped in tonka bean and vanilla, the signature that we found in many of the brand's fragrances. The print is delicately powdery, soft and remarkably fine. Wanting to combine the spirit of youth and the nostalgia of the poet, Rimbaud propels one of the most traditional raw materials into a very contemporary universe with an elegance, finesse and lightness that I find dazzling.

Based on notes alone, I see the similarities of the lavender, tonka bean, woods, musk and florals. The differences, in Rimbaud's notes, seem to be thyme instead of rosemary, neroli instead of bergamot, addition of wheat accord, red fruits, orris butter and vanilla.
 
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Varanis Ridari

The Scented Devil
Basenotes Plus
Oct 17, 2012
Snippets of interviews where Hedi talks about something called "Old England" cologne.

View attachment 180988

Since Hedi loves the amber colour so much, I'm a bit surprised he opted to colour Rimbaud pale rosey-grey instead. It stands out from the colour scheme used for the rest of the line.
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View attachment 180989



Seems like it is discontinued, but I couldn't find anything about it with my brief google search. The closest I found was English Lavender by Yardley. Hedi doesn't describe what "Old England" smells like, so this is all just guesses. Any connection made is with my tinfoil hat on. He talks about old-fashioned soap, and Yardley is also famous for soaps. Yardley has an aristocratic history and connection that I think might appeal to Hedi. The French liked borrowing from the English, especially in the 60s and 70s, so it also doesn't feel out of character. But again, all of this is baseless speculation.

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Reviews on vintage bottles of this scent:






By @Varanis Ridari:


vs one known review of Rimbaud:


Based on notes alone, I see the similarities of the lavender, tonka bean, woods, musk and florals. The differences, in Rimbaud's notes, seem to be thyme instead of rosemary, neroli instead of bergamot, addition of wheat accord, red fruits, orris butter and vanilla.
Another old review of mine with sprawling sentences, punctuation mistakes, and a few inaccuracies that needs tidying up lol.
 

imm0rtelle

Well-known member
Apr 2, 2021
I asked my friend who works at the Madison Ave boutique, and they don't have Rimbaud nor the candles in yet. I wonder when they will make it to the U.S.
Seems like Rimbaud has been arriving in stores now, but I don't think they're officially selling it. I'm tempted to visit some stores to see if I can at least sample it before the supposed Jan. 21 release date.
 

imm0rtelle

Well-known member
Apr 2, 2021
Reivew of Rimbaud: https://www.cafleurebon.com/new-fragrance-review-celine-rimbaud-2022-an-ode-to-haute-parfumerie/

Lavender is present, it is undeniable; sophisticated, slightly dry as if freshly picked from a field in the heart of Provence. As if it had spent the night in a cabin: a slightly woody but with youthful sweetness. Its association with orris butter (common to all the fragrances in the collection) enriches it with powdery and rounded notes, and pushes its chic character even further with a touch of femininity. You have to let a little time pass for the skin to warm up, so that the lavender – orris butter duo makes room for the neroli, which lends its tangy and sweet tonality, and then it becomes more and more sweet over the minutes. Lavender is woven throughout and dressed in white flowers. Still in this mastered setting with haute-couture accents, the powdery notes of orris butter have gained in intensity (Celine communicates on a wheat accord, which perhaps explains this impression), without taking over lavender, which over time has become softer and more rounded. But my biggest surprise was after about thirty minutes, Celine Rimbaud reveals a very delicate vanilla facet, without a hint of syrupy gourmand, giving new life to the classic lavender-vanilla accord so often interpreted in perfumery, but here with an aristocratic dimension the scent of skin… with a discreet trail but with superb longevity
 

imm0rtelle

Well-known member
Apr 2, 2021
Hoping this will be different enough from the minimalistic yet fulfilling variations of lavender and vanilla that Chanel did with Jersey and Caron pour un Homme, which feels like what Slimane has been aiming for with Celine, a French elegance with nothing too over the top.
I ordered a sample of Pour un Homme a few years back when I first started researching Hedi and fragrances. The smell was underwhelming for me, so a part of me is not trying to hype Rimbaud too much in my own mind. Pour un Homme felt simple and didn't smell bad, but it didn't have the finesse that I was looking for. Hopefully Hedi is able to elevate this lavender-vanilla idea to something that is haute parfumerie.

Rimbaud was the longest fragrance for Hedi to finalize:
Chandler Burr: You said Rimbaud took the longest of the 11 to finish and was “the most difficult because it was the simplest.” And that this scent captures the poet’s youth, correct? Why did you find it the most difficult to create?

Hedi Slimane: Working on this perfume, I had to recognize the emotions I felt growing up to adulthood. We did countless versions, and one day we found it.
 

Brooks Otterlake

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Feb 12, 2019
Pour un Homme felt simple and didn't smell bad, but it didn't have the finesse that I was looking for. Hopefully Hedi is able to elevate this lavender-vanilla idea to something that is haute parfumerie.
I'm far from the world's biggest PUH fan, but PUH will be an essential reference point for perfumery long after the entire Celine line is discontinued and forgotten.

Accordingly, I cringe a bit at the suggestion that whatever PUH is, it's not "haute parfumerie."
 

imm0rtelle

Well-known member
Apr 2, 2021
I'm far from the world's biggest PUH fan, but PUH will be an essential reference point for perfumery long after the entire Celine line is discontinued and forgotten.

Accordingly, I cringe a bit at the suggestion that whatever PUH is, it's not "haute parfumerie."
Anyone thinking that the current iteration of Pour un Homme would be considered haute parfumerie for the modern consumer is blinded by nostalgia. If you want to convince me that the current iteration of Pour un Homme I sampled was made with quality materials and finesse, and still reflects what made it an essential reference point then be my guest, but I will seriously question your judgement. With that said, I won't be waiting with bated breath.
 

imm0rtelle

Well-known member
Apr 2, 2021
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Google translate:
The more I smell it, the more intoxicated I become! I have been using Celine's new perfume Rimbaud for the past two days, and the more I smell it, the more I love it! Its soft and whitish orange colour is like a small bottle of champagne, and it has notes of lavender, iris, orange blossom, and vanilla. The opening smells like being in a lavender field under the sunshine of southern France, mixed with the fresh aroma of the earth and soil of iris, warm and clean, and then sweet vanilla, which has a nostalgic powdery feeling, which is extremely comfortable. This is a fragrance suitable for both men and women. The traditional lavender and orange blossom notes have a fresh and strong masculinity. This is balanced with charming musk and sweet vanilla to make the fragrance become warm, close to the skin with a clean, sweet scent of vanilla. Lavender combined with vanilla is a classic fragrance formula.

Another fragrance that combines lavender with vanilla is Chanel’s Jersey. Jersey has three phases of development. First it is presents itself as a slightly sour floral fragrance, then a clear lavender fragrance, and finally a little vanilla at the end. Its overall feeling is brisk and unrestrained. On the other hand, Rimbaud has only two phases. It opens with a lavender that gives a sense of impact, like the juvenile spirit of the poet Rimbaud, willful and reckless. It then quickly turns into the sweet fragrance of vanilla, which is as dazzling as his poetry. While Jersey is brisk and unrestrained, Rimbaud is gentle and introverted. If you like the combination of lavender and vanilla, you must not miss Rimbaud by Celine.
 

mr. reasonable

Well-known member
Jan 1, 2009
Look forward to trying Rimbaud - should be here in HK soonish, I guess.

Just expanding on the discussion of Lavender centric stuff above . . .

I like Caron PUH a lot - it is, clearly, a classic and a masterful Lavender + Tonka/Vanilla blend (thousands of French chappies can't be wrong! :)) I have a couple of bottles from a few years back - dunno if recent versions have changed.

That said, I do think PUH owes a bit to Guerlain Mouchoir de Monsieur & Jicky - both initially 'challenging' for some due to the civet but excellent stuff. Jicky was launched over a century ago aimed at women but apparently it immediately became a favourite with men in Paris. I enjoy both, esp. the older Jicky.

I don't think anyone has mentioned Kiki by Vero Kern here? Rich, deep, luxuriant lavender with a 'caramel' touch. I grabbed a couple of bottles of the EDP a few years ago, thank goodness. I think it's her tribute to Jicky (with her signature 'twist') . . . I get the feeling a few of her pieces were her own nod to Jacques Guerlain. Terrible shame we lost her and the people who should be preserving the legacy don't seem to have a clue . . .

I like Jersey and also the one Mathilde Laurent did for the Cartier Les Heures series but neither enough to buy - I'm pretty well covered re: lavender fougere stuff.
 

imm0rtelle

Well-known member
Apr 2, 2021
Look forward to trying Rimbaud - should be here in HK soonish, I guess.

Just expanding on the discussion of Lavender centric stuff above . . .

I like Caron PUH a lot - it is, clearly, a classic and a masterful Lavender + Tonka/Vanilla blend (thousands of French chappies can't be wrong! :)) I have a couple of bottles from a few years back - dunno if recent versions have changed.

That said, I do think PUH owes a bit to Guerlain Mouchoir de Monsieur & Jicky - both initially 'challenging' for some due to the civet but excellent stuff. Jicky was launched over a century ago aimed at women but apparently it immediately became a favourite with men in Paris. I enjoy both, esp. the older Jicky.

I don't think anyone has mentioned Kiki by Vero Kern here? Rich, deep, luxuriant lavender with a 'caramel' touch. I grabbed a couple of bottles of the EDP a few years ago, thank goodness. I think it's her tribute to Jicky (with her signature 'twist') . . . I get the feeling a few of her pieces were her own nod to Jacques Guerlain. Terrible shame we lost her and the people who should be preserving the legacy don't seem to have a clue . . .

I like Jersey and also the one Mathilde Laurent did for the Cartier Les Heures series but neither enough to buy - I'm pretty well covered re: lavender fougere stuff.
Rimbaud is released worldwide on Jan 21, so it is also available in HK stores right now.

My N95 mask filtered a lot of the heavier molecules, so I mainly got the top notes smelling the test card with the mask on. It was a meh/like until I smelled it off my skin with my mask off. That made it turn from like to love.

Lavender and orris butter seem to take the spotlight in Rimbaud, with the rest of the other parts playing a support role. It straddles the line between cozy and elegant for me. It feels like the younger brother of Hedi's Bois d'Argent, minus the woods, incense and resins. There's almost a slightly minty feeling to the lavender. The lavender is quite elegant and beautiful. It feels pitched up compared to the lavender in Eau Noire. I see facets of the powdery sweetness in Saint-Germain-des-Prés, and the orris butter reminds me of Hedi's Bois d'Argent that was formulated by Annick Menardo. Francois' formulation of Bois d'Argent is a lot more dense and butch than the original version.

This guy wouldn't be too out of place wearing Rimbaud. His hair is polished, while his clothing is casual. It captures how Rimbaud is "suspended on a taut and fragile wire somewhere between childhood and adulthood".
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Jan 18, 2022
Any thoughts on your favourites?

Well, I guess that is widely different from person to person, but both my friend and I liked PARADE and CALIFORNIE. We got a few original testers at Harrod's in London. And they provided us with ample spray samples on blotters that they put in beautiful little envelopes... lovely new products.

The bottle is apparently a design remake of an old perfume bottles from the 20's or 30's (can't remember).
Very beautiful.
 

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wilfred

Well-known member
Jan 13, 2016
i like the look of the travel sprays, anyone knows if these are becoming widely available at the same time as the new scent/candles? price is high but that's expected.

and if the refills are refillable, that's kind of a big deal. you get 2x15ml but obviously i'd like to be able to top them up myself from the big bottle.
 

imm0rtelle

Well-known member
Apr 2, 2021
i like the look of the travel sprays, anyone knows if these are becoming widely available at the same time as the new scent/candles? price is high but that's expected.

and if the refills are refillable, that's kind of a big deal. you get 2x15ml but obviously i'd like to be able to top them up myself from the big bottle.
The travel sprays almost feel like a call back to the original lighters:
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Minotauro

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2021
i'd like to pick up the silver one but it's a bit of a deal breaker if the refills aren't refillable.
I am not going to say what I think of these brands that make stylish and expensive travel sprays but that are not refillable... I find it embarrassing.
A little toy to take money from rich kids and the unwary.
 

wilfred

Well-known member
Jan 13, 2016
I am not going to say what I think of these brands that make stylish and expensive travel sprays but that are not refillable... I find it embarrassing.
A little toy to take money from rich kids and the unwary.
i presume they won't be refillable though the price is simply unacceptable if that's the case.

MFK do the 11ml size which are one-shot only but Kilian's atomiser refill actually unscrews and were even sold empty (with the case) which was really cool as I could buy one to use for a non-Kilian scent.
 

Minotauro

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2021
Now I checked and you can buy 15ml tubes (x2) alone to fill the case so is not the best but is not what I thought.

The case itself, it sports a “Triomphe”-stamped lid and a band that reads “CELINE HAUTE PARFUMERIE.” Priced at €190 EUR (approximately $216 USD) for the two refills and refill case, or €80 EUR (approximately $91 USD) for the refills alone, the new Voyage Travel Spray can be bought in 10 global CELINE flagship boutiques now, and online from early 2022.

According to this the case alone is about 125$.
 

wilfred

Well-known member
Jan 13, 2016
Now I checked and you can buy 15ml tubes (x2) alone to fill the case so is not the best but is not what I thought.

The case itself, it sports a “Triomphe”-stamped lid and a band that reads “CELINE HAUTE PARFUMERIE.” Priced at €190 EUR (approximately $216 USD) for the two refills and refill case, or €80 EUR (approximately $91 USD) for the refills alone, the new Voyage Travel Spray can be bought in 10 global CELINE flagship boutiques now, and online from early 2022.

According to this the case alone is about 125$.
yup i saw all that, the issue is whether these 15ml tubes themselves can be refilled by the user once empty. i don't mind shelling out once to get the awesome looking case and initial refills but no chance i'll be locked into buying more juice at that price to continue using it.
 

Minotauro

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2021
yup i saw all that, the issue is whether these 15ml tubes themselves can be refilled by the user once empty. i don't mind shelling out once to get the awesome looking case and initial refills but no chance i'll be locked into buying more juice at that price to continue using it.
There has been a misunderstanding, sorry wilfred 😅

I cannot tell you if these tubes can be refilled, we'll see; but in any case, Celine's 100 ml bottles are now 240$ (2.4$ per ml) and these travel sprays 15x2 ml are 91$ (3.03$ per ml). Checking the price of many other brands the difference is not one of the greatest; in fact, it has to be one of the "fairest" when we talk about travel sets.

Of course, thinking about it, the Celine 100 ml/200 ml bottle is one of the most beautiful, it is heavy and you can feel quality there;I don't think it's cheap compared to other bottles, so maybe that's just why they can sell the tubes so cheap...
Because the difference in price between going from the original bottle to a glass tube is much higher than in other brands, that's why they can afford to put the price of such tubes "only" 20% more expensive while in other brands it is 50% or more...
 

wilfred

Well-known member
Jan 13, 2016
yeah the price of the tubes it not absolutely awful i'll give them that. but if i own the 200ml size of said fragrance i'm reluctant, in fact I flat-out refuse to make mulitple purchases to keep the lovely looking travel spray topped up. one shot @ 190 EUR or whatever for the case and initial tubes sure, but leave my wallet alone after that! admittedly i'm probably not the Celine target audience but i refused to buy the MFK globe trotter for the same reason - non-refillable refills. and with that you could actually find the vials at a good discount from time to time.
 

imm0rtelle

Well-known member
Apr 2, 2021
Rimbaud review:

Of all the things in life that seem to be heavily gendered, fragrance definitely sits high on the list. It’s been a commonly held (and marketed) belief that perfumes are for women and colognes are for men. That said, more and more perfumers are looking to create scents that speak to an identity and experience that goes far beyond gender. French fashion house Celine’s new fragrance Rimbaud is among the new school of scents that transcend the stereotypes of what is considered a feminine or masculine scent.


Rimbaud eau de parfum is the 10th scent in the Celine Haute Parfumerie project, created by renowned photographer and Celine Creative Director Hedi Slimane. In his nearly 30-year fashion career, Slimane has continuously challenged the societal notion of gender through his imagery and collections — so this new fragrance is, for lack of better words, very on brand.

“For this scent the couturier reconnected with his favorite themes: the notion of identity beyond gender, the essence of youth, and the fragility of a state suspended somewhere between childhood and adulthood. But also the French spirit,” the brand says in a press release.

The perfume itself has a warm yet herbal scent that dissipates in a soft, powdery finish — it’s housed in a beautiful glass bottle that is reflective of the chic simplicity that Celine is heralded for.

Celine Haute Parfumerie new fragrance Rimbaud

Celine Haute Parfumerie
You’re probably thinking “this all sounds great and vague but what are the notes?” At first whiff, the nose catches a strong lavender note combined with a slight mint-like freshness.

“With its vivacious and subtle camphor-like scent, lavender is an archetype for masculine fragrances,” says the brand. “The essence as well as the lavender absolute selected by the Maison Celine come from the drôme in Haute Provence where the plant has been cultivated since antiquity.” The house harvests lavender between the months of July and August when they first begin to bloom to catch the height of their scent.

Another prominent note in the fragrance is Iris, known for its gentle, subtly sweet, and muted tone. This note gives the fragrance an elegant feel — and though it would smell lovely in the daytime, it seems like it would pair perfectly with a floor-length evening gown or dashing tuxedo.

The fragrance overall has a powdery scent (think: baby powder but elevated) which is a signature of Celine Haute Parfumerie. It is rounded out by additional notes of neroli, orris butter, wheat accord, musk, and vanilla for a warm, slightly sweet and soft finish.

In its complexity, it’s clear that this fragrance is brimming with versatility, softness, and depth — the markers of a truly genderless treasure.
I also detect that subtle sweet mint freshness in the lavender. The orris butter does make it lean elegant.
 

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