NEW: La Collection Celine Haute Parfumerie

PourHomie

Basenotes Member
Jan 7, 2017
I REALLY wanted to like this new fragrance, but I just didn’t. I’ll be returning it now.
Same, my sample isnt growing on me.

Much prefer Black Tie to it, and if I get another one itll be Eau de Californie. Not sure exactly why i dont love this, may be the vetiver though and or juniper
 

cheapimitation

Basenotes Dependent
May 15, 2015
I tried Bois Dormant today, they had also gotten the candles in and I ended up buying Papiers Froissés.

Ehh, Bois Dormant is appropriately named as it put me to sleep. A very soft woody thing with the house signature vanillic dry down. It's like Eau de Californie with a touch of Black Tie's vanilla in the base but somehow much more bland than either of those. I dunno, maybe if I sprayed a lot all over and wore it all day I would get something more out of it, but I did do a good couple sprays on my arm and it didn't do anything for me.

The candles are nice, the all shiny black kind of reminds me of Tom Fords aesthetic, there's something 70s luxe about it. The scents are nice and restrained in the way that the fragrance collection is. Papiers Froissés has a nice almost pine/christmasy vibe to it which feels perfect for the weather. Notes listed include: CEDAR, ABSOLUTE OF EVERLASTING FLOWER, FIR BALSAM, BLACKCURRANT BUD AND CYPRUS.

I also liked Tambour for a winter candle and Grand Lys would be nice in spring. The candles do seem to carry some of the olfactory signature of the perfumes.

Haven't burned it yet so I can't report on it's projection but I'll report back. If the marketing copy is to be believed, it should perform very nicely:
"In line with the tradition of couturier parfumeur, each candle undergoes a meticulous production method developed by the maison’s wax-maker, one of the very few artisans that are trained both as a wax maker and perfumer.

Designed to recreate the accords and preserve the quality of the ingredients, the made-to-measure formula of six to seven waxes and oils goes through a painstaking creation process, including slow casting, and is only created in small batches."


IMG_7261.JPG
 

imm0rtelle

Basenotes Junkie
Apr 2, 2021
Ehh, Bois Dormant is appropriately named as it put me to sleep. A very soft woody thing with the house signature vanillic dry down. It's like Eau de Californie with a touch of Black Tie's vanilla in the base but somehow much more bland than either of those. I dunno, maybe if I sprayed a lot all over and wore it all day I would get something more out of it, but I did do a good couple sprays on my arm and it didn't do anything for me.
I appreciate the first impressions, and seeing how everyone seems to get something different is making me very curious and gives me great anticipation to try it.
 

imm0rtelle

Basenotes Junkie
Apr 2, 2021
Bois Dormant review:
My first association, especially from a distance: day cream. A very good, fine with something fresh and spicy in it. In front of me I see breakfast on a hotel terrace overlooking the garden on a cheerful morning after a restful night. Perfect mood.

The creamy iris butter dominates the Vetiver-Ceder combination in the long run. The cedar does not look pungent synthetic or unpleasant woody-ambery (a problem that I often have with perfumes for which "cedar" is listed as a note), but like the dry cedar woods for the wardrobe. When the freshness has disappeared from the top note, then everything remains soft and round all the time. Really nice. The day is relaxed after breakfast.

However, it is not very warm. A pleasant, but by no means fresh, coolness permeates the fragrance. There is an extremely discreet smoke note that develops in the middle, which removes the scent of arbitrariness. In the dry-down, nothing of this can be felt. Fortunately, it doesn't throw vanilla and musk around you either. So Bois Dormant never becomes sweet or fluffy, but retains a certain factual straightforwardness despite all the softness.

For me, Bois Dormant is a powdery-soft, woody perfume that tilts the stereotypical feminine side with masculine additions of spice and traces of smoke, without sweetness. I find it friendly, and elegant. The silage is unobtrusive, the durability moderate: Almost nothing could be smelled of two sprays on the wrist after six hours. So you can easily apply a different fragrance in the evening.
 

imm0rtelle

Basenotes Junkie
Apr 2, 2021
LOL, as far as I know no perfumers have ever been officially named.
And I actually think it is better that way, as you get to better experience the line without unnecessary expectations. If I know that Annick Menardo, just as an example, was one of the perfumers, I would be tempted to compare the fragrances to previous works by Annick, rather than judging them as is. Someone who has had a bad experience with the perfumer's previous fragrances might even write off on trying the line because they think it would smell like the fragrance that they don't like. Not knowing helps remove any bias, so I can understand why the brand keeps it hidden.

Also, knowing how many perfumers were involved can start allowing people to separate the singular line into x number of parts, each part by each perfumer. It sort of ruins the illusion of the line being one singular unit.

Sorry for being lazy - have the perfumers names been released?

I went through 4 pages and my thumbs are tired of scrolling.

Thanks y'all
There are rumours on who the perfumers are, but what's really the point in knowing? The answer in in this thread if you look for it, so it depends on really how motivated you are.
 

Dane

Basenotes Dependent
Jan 9, 2002
And I actually think it is better that way, as you get to better experience the line without unnecessary expectations. If I know that Annick Menardo, just as an example, was one of the perfumers, I would be tempted to compare the fragrances to previous works by Annick, rather than judging them as is. Someone who has had a bad experience with the perfumer's previous fragrances might even write off on trying the line because they think it would smell like the fragrance that they don't like. Not knowing helps remove any bias, so I can understand why the brand keeps it hidden.

Also, knowing how many perfumers were involved can start allowing people to separate the singular line into x number of parts, each part by each perfumer. It sort of ruins the illusion of the line being one singular unit.


There are rumours on who the perfumers are, but what's really the point in knowing? The answer in in this thread if you look for it, so it depends on really how motivated you are.
Interesting perspective - but some of us like to know who cooked our meals, so to speak. It's like buying a painting you love - doesn't matter if you know the artist as long as you love it - I agree with you there.

And while I understand making assumptions because of the perfumer, but at the same time, because I don't know who authored any of these, I won't go out of my way to test them.

Also, wouldn't you want to know if you were paying $$$? I think it's a fair question.
 

cheapimitation

Basenotes Dependent
May 15, 2015
I'd like to know the perfumer(s). But it is such a cohesive line I can see the point that maybe knowing that several people where involved might make it somehow feel less whole. The more I try them the more I start to think they all have the same base, maybe one perfumer created it and Hedi just sprinkled some extra notes on top to make the line.

(I'm kidding of course)
 

Dane

Basenotes Dependent
Jan 9, 2002
I'd like to know the perfumer(s). But it is such a cohesive line I can see the point that maybe knowing that several people where involved might make it somehow feel less whole. The more I try them the more I start to think they all have the same base, maybe one perfumer created it and Hedi just sprinkled some extra notes on top to make the line.

(I'm kidding of course)
It's definitely a pro not knowing, for some. Chandler Burr used to send out blank samples and people would guess, based on the smell alone.

But for me - especially at their asking price, I want details. Lots of them. Interviews with the perfumers. The whole lot. I love that stuff.

To each their own!
 

imm0rtelle

Basenotes Junkie
Apr 2, 2021
The more I try them the more I start to think they all have the same base, maybe one perfumer created it and Hedi just sprinkled some extra notes on top to make the line.
I think the truth to that is if you love one, you'll likely like another.

Interesting perspective - but some of us like to know who cooked our meals, so to speak.

And while I understand making assumptions because of the perfumer, but at the same time, because I don't know who authored any of these, I won't go out of my way to test them.
Yeah, I have to agree with you, and I do like your food analogy. To me, I know who the executive chef is, so I got that little bit of assurance and don't value knowing as much who were the ones who did the heavy lifting in the kitchen (the rumours are interesting). I see the creative director as the executive chef who is in charge of making sure what leaves the kitchen is up to standards and congruent with vision of the restaurant.

But, I also acknowledge that this is a mindset unique to the consumer and might not be what the perfumers actually care about. Here is Olivia Giacobetti sharing her thoughts on brands using her name for marketing:
K: Today you seem to be picking your projects very carefully, working at your own pace that’s very different from the heart rate the modern perfumery is used to. Is it the lack of good ideas from the brands, or the new raw material regulations, or some other reason you don’t do as many perfumes as you used to do before?

O
: I make as many perfumes as before, but my name is not always mentioned. Some brands want to put the name of the perfumer forward at all costs, others, on the contrary, prefer to keep it quiet. This is the case with the recent perfumes I have made. Personally, I’m very happy to disappear behind another creator — it’s the game of this shadow profession.

Most brands are very fragmented with different people in charge of different things. It is different at Celine because the creative director pretty much directs and oversees every detail in a very obsessive compulsive way, which is something I value. Here is a recent campaign for Eau de Californie. I think the images and music help convey a sense of the olfactory aesthetic to Eau de Californie. There's an easy going and chic feeling to the entire line. Effortlessly stylish without trying too hard. Making elegance feel youthful.

 

Nom de Guerre

Basenotes Dependent
Jan 2, 2020
Is it me or does the Eau de Californie campaign clip look pretty dated and out of sync with what Celine has been putting out there recently? The model looks like a trust-fund baby trying to be badass (or Aaron Carter), it seems like an ad Hollister would make. Is that stoned Rick from Rick & Morty on his shoulder? Weird.

Here is the SS2022 show, looks like it could've been shot in California:

 

Paddington

Marmalade Sandwich Eater
Basenotes Plus
Jun 17, 2021
Is it me or does the Eau de Californie campaign clip look pretty dated and out of sync with what Celine has been putting out there recently? The model looks like a trust-fund baby trying to be badass (or Aaron Carter), it seems like an ad Hollister would make. Is that stoned Rick from Rick & Morty on his shoulder? Weird.
It does look like trust kiddies flexing on Instagram I do agree
 

imm0rtelle

Basenotes Junkie
Apr 2, 2021
Is it me or does the Eau de Californie campaign clip look pretty dated and out of sync with what Celine has been putting out there recently? The model looks like a trust-fund baby trying to be badass (or Aaron Carter), it seems like an ad Hollister would make. Is that stoned Rick from Rick & Morty on his shoulder? Weird.

Here is the SS2022 show, looks like it could've been shot in California:

The part that can be confusing is how there isn't one singular image for Celine, so much so that most people won't realize the men's line after ss21, launched in the beginning of the pandemic, is called Celine Homme. There was a drastic shift in tone compared to pre-ss21.

This is Celine menswear (pre-ss21), not Celine Homme (post-fw20).

Ss21 was the start of Celine Homme:

Looking at Celine menswear, you can feel the heavy emphasis that gives a retro feeling, while still feeling youthful, which is more congruent with the Celine fragrances (made in 2019). Celine Homme is much more forward facing and has more of an emphasis on modernity than Celine menswear (pre-ss21).

Hedi's thought on his design philosophy for fragrance vs fashion:
Perfumes are there to last, they accompany us faithfully in time, and merge with ourselves, with our lives. Fashion, by comparison, is adultery.
I interpret this as Hedi saying the fragrances are meant to transcend fashion trends and are built to be quite timeless. I sometimes struggle to find the Celine fragrances that would pair well with the trendier, and sportier, Celine Homme looks. I feel like those looks would demand a sportier fragrance.

I can totally understand why you get that dated feeling from the Eau de Californie campaign. When I saw it, I immediately thought of Hedi's 2010s Saint Laurent aesthetics. The music is also from the singer featured at the Saint Laurent introductory campaign in 2012. It is safe to say that Eau de Californie is Hedi's tribute to his time at Saint Laurent and continued love for California.

The comparison to Hollister helps highlight something worth discussing. Hedi's appeal can definitely feel esoteric for many. On surface level, you can find "similar" pieces at Hollister, or whatever brand to denigrate his work, but the material speaks for itself. Although it might not scream or shout as being "designer", it just feels good as the wearer. I get a very similar feel good feeling when wearing the fragrances, which also aren't anything that screams or shouts for attention. Many people wouldn't understand, and expect something that commands the attention of everyone in the room if they're paying so much for something, fashion or fragrance, from Hedi. But for those who care about the details that Hedi cares about, nothing is better. But I do think this comes from a very privileged position of being comfortable with spending a lot of money, without looking like they're spending a lot of money. The art of subtle flex.

I think the model really captures the androgyny of Eau de Californie quite well. He doesn't have the "look" of a North American butch badass, and a butch badass wouldn't fit the olfactory aesthetic of Eau de Californie, or the brand at all. That said, I do want to believe a possibility that looks don't dictate personality. A real badass is someone who acts "manly". They're determined, conscientious, competent, and reliable. I personally believe someone who looks feminine can act manly, and someone who looks masculine can act unmanly. But if books can't be, somewhat accurately, judged by their covers, people won't be so ready to judge books by their covers. So it is quite a complex topic on whether people can be judged by their looks.
 

Dane

Basenotes Dependent
Jan 9, 2002
The part that can be confusing is how there isn't one singular image for Celine, so much so that most people won't realize the men's line after ss21, launched in the beginning of the pandemic, is called Celine Homme. There was a drastic shift in tone compared to pre-ss21.

This is Celine menswear (pre-ss21), not Celine Homme (post-fw20).

Ss21 was the start of Celine Homme:

Looking at Celine menswear, you can feel the heavy emphasis that gives a retro feeling, while still feeling youthful, which is more congruent with the Celine fragrances (made in 2019). Celine Homme is much more forward facing and has more of an emphasis on modernity than Celine menswear (pre-ss21).

Hedi's thought on his design philosophy for fragrance vs fashion:

I interpret this as Hedi saying the fragrances are meant to transcend fashion trends and are built to be quite timeless. I sometimes struggle to find the Celine fragrances that would pair well with the trendier, and sportier, Celine Homme looks. I feel like those looks would demand a sportier fragrance.

I can totally understand why you get that dated feeling from the Eau de Californie campaign. When I saw it, I immediately thought of Hedi's 2010s Saint Laurent aesthetics. The music is also from the singer featured at the Saint Laurent introductory campaign in 2012. It is safe to say that Eau de Californie is Hedi's tribute to his time at Saint Laurent and continued love for California.

The comparison to Hollister helps highlight something worth discussing. Hedi's appeal can definitely feel esoteric for many. On surface level, you can find "similar" pieces at Hollister, or whatever brand to denigrate his work, but the material speaks for itself. Although it might not scream or shout as being "designer", it just feels good as the wearer. I get a very similar feel good feeling when wearing the fragrances, which also aren't anything that screams or shouts for attention. Many people wouldn't understand, and expect something that commands the attention of everyone in the room if they're paying so much for something, fashion or fragrance, from Hedi. But for those who care about the details that Hedi cares about, nothing is better. But I do think this comes from a very privileged position of being comfortable with spending a lot of money, without looking like they're spending a lot of money. The art of subtle flex.

I think the model really captures the androgyny of Eau de Californie quite well. He doesn't have the "look" of a North American butch badass, and a butch badass wouldn't fit the olfactory aesthetic of Eau de Californie, or the brand at all. That said, I do want to believe a possibility that looks don't dictate personality. A real badass is someone who acts "manly". They're determined, conscientious, competent, and reliable. I personally believe someone who looks feminine can act manly, and someone who looks masculine can act unmanly. But if books can't be, somewhat accurately, judged by their covers, people won't be so ready to judge books by their covers. So it is quite a complex topic on whether people can be judged by their looks.
I had some Dior Homme clothes from the early Hedi days that I have a feeling you'd enjoy. Sadly I was a size 36 (that was the smallest they made - but Hedi made everything 2 sizes too small). Luckily my brother is a rake so he has it all now that I'm not a rake. He has no clue what he has, he just knows I probably spent a lot.

Anyway - I think there are valid points to both knowing and not knowing the perfumers - and Hedi knows what he's doing, so I doubt it's hurting them financially. It's just need info that some of us perf-nerds love. That's why I've been on bn for over 20 years.
 

cheapimitation

Basenotes Dependent
May 15, 2015
I had some Dior Homme clothes from the early Hedi days that I have a feeling you'd enjoy. Sadly I was a size 36 (that was the smallest they made - but Hedi made everything 2 sizes too small). Luckily my brother is a rake so he has it all now that I'm not a rake. He has no clue what he has, he just knows I probably spent a lot.

Anyway - I think there are valid points to both knowing and not knowing the perfumers - and Hedi knows what he's doing, so I doubt it's hurting them financially. It's just need info that some of us perf-nerds love. That's why I've been on bn for over 20 years.
Haha same, unfortunately I have sold off most of my original Dior Homme by now for that reason. Not only was I skinnier then but my concept of how things should fit back then (vacuum packed) feels silly now. I'll never forgive myself that I have this coat that was meant to be oversized from the last collection and I had their tailors slim it down to fit close to the body, it's the only item that would have stood the test of time in terms of silhouette if I hadn't messed with it!

I've noticed that disconnect with the ad campaigns, they seem two have two streams of campaign: one that goes on the classic French new wave/70s bourgeoisie look which is used for more season-less items like bags and fragrance, and then ads that reflect the current collection. It does seem odd at first as current runway shows are so different from that look, but they do still keep these kind of pieces in rotation with each season's offering. I was also thinking how other brands do this, the fashion in Sauvage ads for example has nothing to do with Dior runway clothes.
 

Nom de Guerre

Basenotes Dependent
Jan 2, 2020
I was also thinking how other brands do this, the fashion in Sauvage ads for example has nothing to do with Dior runway clothes.

Eau de Californie is from the upper echelon (a la La Collection Privée Christian Dior) unlike Sauvage, I wouldn't care if it was Nomade or whatever Celine sells at Sephora.

EDIT: Haha, Nomade is by Chloé. But whatever, you get my point.

The current runway shows leave me lukewarm. They seem (with Hedi at the helm) to strike the uncomfortable and unsure middle ground – are we chic and sophisticated or edgy and modern? I think I wouldn't be as harsh if they would be consistent with their output.
 

imm0rtelle

Basenotes Junkie
Apr 2, 2021
The current runway shows leave me lukewarm. They seem (with Hedi at the helm) to strike the uncomfortable and unsure middle ground – are we chic and sophisticated or edgy and modern? I think I wouldn't be as harsh if they would be consistent with their output.
Celine Homme (post-fw20) is definitely more edgy and modern, with a rare sprinkle of dressier looks here and there. I feel like Hedi was trying to start a revolution at Celine, and shift the tide to more sophisticated and formal dressing again...unfortunately that didn't penetrate the zeitgeist and failed commercially. The pivot from Celine menswear (ss19 - fw20) to Celine Homme was drastic, but it was the right commercial decision as it sold significantly better. If there was any momentum towards going against the casual streetwear aesthetic, the pandemic pretty much killed it off.

I've noticed that disconnect with the ad campaigns, they seem two have two streams of campaign: one that goes on the classic French new wave/70s bourgeoisie look which is used for more season-less items like bags and fragrance, and then ads that reflect the current collection. It does seem odd at first as current runway shows are so different from that look, but they do still keep these kind of pieces in rotation with each season's offering.
Here is another campaign, back in April, used for Saint-Germain-des-Prés.
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Very retro classical vibes, but with a hint of youthful edginess to it. Classy without feeling heavy and dated.

The entire brand of Celine encompasses a wide range, and Hedi only has so much "room" to show the audience every facet of it. People have limited attention spans and he can only choose to highlight certain things, so it can sometimes feel confusing and schizophrenic. It really feels like the brand wants to be able to allow almost everyone to walk in and out the stores with something, so they target a wide net.
 

imm0rtelle

Basenotes Junkie
Apr 2, 2021
Celine candles are finally available on the webstore now:
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CELINE HAUTE PARFUMERIE
CANDLE COLLECTION


L'INVENTAIRE

THE SPIRIT OF MY APARTMENT IN SAINT-GERMAIN-DES-PRÉS. THE VERSAILLES PARQUET LIT BY PARCHMENT LAMPSHADES AND GOLDEN WOOD CHANDELIERS, THE STREAMLINED WOOD ON THE EYRE DE L’ANUX CHAIRS, THE PILES OF BOOKS ON MODERNIST TABLES. THE WARMTH OF AN INHERENTLY PARISIAN PLACE.

ACCORD OF OAK, CEDAR AND ROCKROSE, AMBERGRIS ACCORD.


PALIMPSESTE

“HE WANTED NATURAL FLOWERS IMITATING ARTIFICIAL ONES”
DES ESSEINTES, À REBOURS, JORIS-KARL HUYSMANS, 1884.

I LIKE THE SCENT OF OLD ROSES, IN A POISONOUS BLACK ROSE SPIRIT, LIKE A WILTING ROSE. IT MIGHT BE EMILY’S ROSE, THE ONE FROM ODESSEY AND ORACLE, THE ZOMBIES’ LEGENDARY PSYCHEDELIC ALBUM.

ACCORD OF GALLICA ROSE, PEAR, IVY AND MOSS.


PAPIERS FROISSÉS

“THE UNHAPPINESS OF LOVE MUST BE REPLACED BY THE HAPPINESS OF WRITING”
JEAN COCTEAU, LETTRES À PIERRE BOREL, 1951.

I WANTED A PERFUME ABOUT WRITING, ABOUT FRAGILE AND UNCERTAIN WORDS. A CANDLE EVOKING THE ALMOST LOST RITUAL OF CORRESPONDENCE, THE DELICATE LUXURY OF WRITING PAPER WITH A SUBTLE WEAVE.

CEDAR, ABSOLUTE OF EVERLASTING FLOWER, FIR BALSAM, BLACKCURRANT BUD AND CYPRUS.


TAMBOUR NOIR

THE BAR OF MY HOUSE IN BEVERLY HILLS. CRYSTAL ART DECO CARAFES, THE AROMA OF BOURBON IN THE AIR. THE BLACK VINYL RECORD TURNING TO THE SOUND OF A 60’S FOLK GUITAR.

SMOKY BOURBON ACCORD, ACCORD OF LEATHER, PATCHOULI, COFFEE ABSOLUTE AND VANILLA


GRANDS LYS

“ON A CALM BLACK WAVE WHERE SLEEP THE STARS
WHITE OPHELIA FLOATS LIKE A GREAT LILY.”
OPHÉLIA, ARTHUR RIMBAUD, 1870.

I REMEMBER THE OBSESSIVE AND SUAVE FRAGRANCE OF WHITE LILIES DURING MY BEGINNINGS AS A COUTURIER, AND MY INTERIORS AND CREATION STUDIOS IN A 70’S PARISIAN MOOD.

PIMENTO, YLANG-YLANG, GALBANUM, VANILLA AND HELIOTROPE.


NIGHTCLUBBING

THE MEMORY OF MY PARISIAN NIGHTS SPENT IN THE BAINS DOUCHES AND THE PALACE EVERY EVENING OF MY LIFE.
THE SMELLS OF SUEDE AND NICOTINE CREATING A DECADENTE AND AMBERED PATINA, FRAGRANT HAIR ON THE NAPE OF A NECK EXUDING A VANILLA AROMA. CRIMSON VELVET ON A SEAT, ENGULFING A BOY AND A GIRL, THEIR IMAGE REFLECTED TO INFINITY.
WANDERING AROUND THE STREETS OF PARIS UNTIL DAWN.

GALBANUM, WHITE ORRIS BUTTER, PATCHOULI, TREE MOSS, VANILLA, MUSK.
 

imm0rtelle

Basenotes Junkie
Apr 2, 2021
I just received my 5ml decant of Bois Dormant – this stuff is lovely. To my nose, it's the closest one to the original Dior Homme (2005) in the Celine range but the addition of juniper really sets it apart and makes it quite airy, even a bit mentholated. The iris is of powdery/pasty type (like the 2005 DH) and not as lipsticky as the 2011 DH. It gets woodier and woodier as it progresses. I see very little resemblance to Black Tie. To my nose, it's closer to Eau de Californie (I prefer Bois Dormant) and even Reptile (I haven't worn Reptile in a while, so don't take my word on it). I really like it. The downside is that it's not something original or groundbreaking, just another good take on DH.
Finally got a chance to try Bois Dormant, and I have to agree that the original 2005 formulation of Dior Homme was what immediately came to mind. The woodiness reminds me a bit of Rose 31's woody facets, which is one of the fragrances that Hedi was rumoured to be wearing while in LA.

I'm surprised, but also not surprised, Hedi would revisit Dior Homme at Celine since it was such a fan favourite, and it is him reclaiming what is his. I need to wear it more to see how Hedi luxe'd this DNA up in Bois Dormant so that it deserves to be on the exclusive tier, rather than the mainstream designer drugstore tier that Dior Homme was positioned.

I can imagine Bois Dormant pairing beautifully with Pete Doherty:
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There's a very autumnal vibe to Bois Dormant, so I'm not surprised it was released now. The campaign photo for it makes sense too:
image0.jpg
 

imm0rtelle

Basenotes Junkie
Apr 2, 2021
I'm surprised, but also not surprised, Hedi would revisit Dior Homme at Celine since it was such a fan favourite, and it is him reclaiming what is his. I need to wear it more to see how Hedi luxe'd this DNA up in Bois Dormant so that it deserves to be on the exclusive tier, rather than the mainstream designer drugstore tier that Dior Homme was positioned.
After doing a comparison test between Bois Dormant and first formulation Dior Homme, I can without a doubt say Bois Dormant is the more enjoyable experience, and the more refined fragrance. Bois Dormant opens with a smooth woody/earthy, smokiness, similar to a facet of the opening of Nightclubbing; whereas, Dior Homme opens with a tart brightness and a cinnamon-like spice combo that feels jarring. Comparing them side by side really helped emphasize how Bois Dormant is not merely a copy of Dior Homme. The subtle dry dusty/powdery woodiness in Bois Dormant is so addicting. Everything is pitched so beautifully in Bois Dormant, giving off a feeling that everything is in harmony.
 

cheapimitation

Basenotes Dependent
May 15, 2015
Gave Bois Dormant another try today without testing anything else and I did get more out of it. I can definitely see comparisons to the original Dior Homme EDT, it's not identical by any means but worth checking out for fans of Dior Homme. BD is lacking the lipstick iris note but feels a bit more powdery, softer, and warmer. I always thought of the dry down of Dior Homme being more about "soft woods" than iris (the iris is really a top note) which would describe Bois Dormant well. Could be the nostalgia factor, but I prefer Dior Homme as I find there is just more to it. Bois Dormant is incredibly pleasant but feels like the Celine house sauce dialed down to pianissimo. I find others like Eau de Californie or Rimbaud having a similar scent profile but a lot more interest. But, if you'd like the Celine fragrance aesthetic stripped back to its barest essence, this might be the one for you.
 

imm0rtelle

Basenotes Junkie
Apr 2, 2021
When I smell my Bois Dormant sample while in its container, I get Eau de Californie's smoothness. When I smell my test strip I have trapped under a cup, I also get some of Cologne Française's papery facet. And on skin, I can't forget the waxy and warm facets of Dior Homme. Bois Dormant feels like it takes facets from a lot of the previous fragrances. From my most recent application, I was also able to detect subtle hay-like sweetness, and a smouldering quality, that reminds me of Eau Noire. With this Eau Noire connection, I am better able to appreciate how Bois Dormant is the day twin equivalent of Black Tie.
 

cheapimitation

Basenotes Dependent
May 15, 2015
Wearing Black Tie from a sample today again and it is smelling especially nice. It is really well balanced so it doesn't go too far into sickly sweet vanilla or heavy woods while still feeling very warm. I also get a whiff of "cigarettes in the club" accord that is much more prominent in Nightclubbing. There's also something just a little bit boozy about it like a smokey Scotch, but just a touch.

It is very good at invoking an image of a certain type of person, but it almost feels too formal for my current style. I used to wear a lot of slim blazers and skinny jeans and go to clubs but now my style is more informal and eclectic. It's a lovey perfume but I'm still not sure it's "me". I think something like Eau de California or Bois Dormant fits my softer style/personality better.
 

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catalogue your collection, keep track of your perfume wish-list, log your daily fragrance wears, review your latest finds, seek out long-lost scented loves, keep track of the latest perfume news, find your new favourite fragrance, and discuss perfume with like-minded people from all over the world...

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