pkiler

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Dec 5, 2007
I have a trip to mysore in the next two months - where i will be sourcing the real shit from where they cut this stuff :vrolijk_26:

I suggest that for the real stuff, that you buy from a reputable dealer instead of getting ripped off while in Mysore in Person.

I can recommend the Santalum Album from many sources, in many different quantities.
I was even able to acquire the gold standard of 80 year old aged Mysore Sandalwood. That which I judge all sandalwoods by...
 

benzganesh

Well-known member
May 22, 2012
I suggest that for the real stuff, that you buy from a reputable dealer instead of getting ripped off while in Mysore in Person.

I can recommend the Santalum Album from many sources, in many different quantities.
I was even able to acquire the gold standard of 80 year old aged Mysore Sandalwood. That which I judge all sandalwoods by...

What makes you think i will get ripped off? my distant cousin is a forrest officer in the indian state of karnataka, know that - i am not a tourist looking for some lost gold, i've also been given a permit to import a few sandalwood trees so that i can grow them in Malaysia, my family have used for many generations real mysore sandalwood from Mysore, only the last few years there was a decline due to the newer generation losing interest in the traditional ingredients from india such as sandalwood and oudh.
 

Pharmacist_Blender

Well-known member
Jan 15, 2013
I suggest that for the real stuff, that you buy from a reputable dealer instead of getting ripped off while in Mysore in Person.

I can recommend the Santalum Album from many sources, in many different quantities.
I was even able to acquire the gold standard of 80 year old aged Mysore Sandalwood. That which I judge all sandalwoods by...

I would love to buy from a reliable vendor... Who would you suggest?
 

outline

Well-known member
Mar 24, 2013
Benzganesh how was your trip? Would be interesting to see some pictures or hear from you.

What makes you think i will get ripped off? my distant cousin is a forrest officer in the indian state of karnataka, know that - i am not a tourist looking for some lost gold, i've also been given a permit to import a few sandalwood trees so that i can grow them in Malaysia, my family have used for many generations real mysore sandalwood from Mysore, only the last few years there was a decline due to the newer generation losing interest in the traditional ingredients from india such as sandalwood and oudh.
 

mikeperez23

Be Here. Now.
Basenotes Plus
Dec 31, 2006
I was in the same predicament a couple of years ago but eventually bit the bullet and got myself a small bottle. I had a pleasant e-mail exchange and telephone conversation with Alec Lawless, who reassured me that their Mysore sandalwood is the real deal (albeit not aged). Coupled with the odd discussion with WillC and a couple of other Basenoters, I believe him:

http://www.aqua-oleum.co.uk/proddetail.php?prod=sandalwood_mysore

Reviving this old thread. I just sprung for a bottle of this. See how long it takes to get to me - they're in the UK.

I got an itching to compare it to a new bottle of Mysore Sandalwood that I bought from Dawn Spencer Hurwitz.

I didn't even know that DSH made a Mysore Sandalwood oil & honestly I've never heard anyone here on BN describe it or discuss it, so I don't even know how much Mysore it actuall contains, etc. Perhaps I should email her. Here's the link to it on her website: http://www.dshperfumes.com/shop/mysore-sandalwood/
 

lpp

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Feb 8, 2010
Reviving this old thread. I just sprung for a bottle of this. See how long it takes to get to me - they're in the UK.

I got an itching to compare it to a new bottle of Mysore Sandalwood that I bought from Dawn Spencer Hurwitz.

I didn't even know that DSH made a Mysore Sandalwood oil & honestly I've never heard anyone here on BN describe it or discuss it, so I don't even know how much Mysore it actuall contains, etc. Perhaps I should email her. Here's the link to it on her website: http://www.dshperfumes.com/shop/mysore-sandalwood/

Please let us know - Aqua Oleum is a reliable source, although the selection is not a wide as some.
 

badarun

Well-known member
Jan 15, 2013
Vinramani's source is something I'll recommend; however, be preparedto see leaks / broken bottle too, this is a state govt run jjoint, legit, but no QC at all. My suggestion, if you have a contact in India, have them buy and ship, better choice, decant to a leak proof vial and ship.

There are other legit sources, but I've been away too long to recommend anything close to reliable apart from the above.

As for scarcity, I would say it's still "easily" available locally ; but it's a cash crop, so politicians control vast majority of the real source - which is an area which is part jungle, part tourist spot between the states of Karnataka (where mysore is) and tamil nadu. U can find hand carved sandalwood statues / figures for one hundreth the price it sells in the western markets. Also adulterated SW oil can be found at these places.
 

lpp

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Feb 8, 2010
Most of the ones that I have from various sources are sitting around ageing, so they're not necessarily ready to wear.
 

mikeperez23

Be Here. Now.
Basenotes Plus
Dec 31, 2006
...I got an itching to compare it to a new bottle of Mysore Sandalwood that I bought from Dawn Spencer Hurwitz.

I didn't even know that DSH made a Mysore Sandalwood oil & honestly I've never heard anyone here on BN describe it or discuss it, so I don't even know how much Mysore it actuall contains, etc. Perhaps I should email her. Here's the link to it on her website: http://www.dshperfumes.com/shop/mysore-sandalwood/

I've spent a couple weeks now exploring this oil.

It's not as 'realistic' as the Aqua Oleum that I own or the Profumo one that's been blended with alcohol, but it is very wearable and sort of 'average' when I want to lift a certain fragrance and boost its woodiness.

I sent an email to DSH asking them about this, since the price is so affordable for a 'Mysore' sandalwood & this was the reply I got:

-----Original Message-----
From: Dawn Spencer Hurwitz [mailto:dsh@indra.com]
Sent: Wednesday, February 12, 2014 6:49 PM
To: Mike
Subject: Re: Contact Form Submission on DSHPerfumes.com

Hi Mike,
Our Mysore Sandalwood that you received is sold just as we receive without being diluted with a carrier oil, however, we believe it has been pre-mixed with some synthetics but remains mostly natural. This is how it can be sold at a less expensive price than straight aromatherapy grade sandalwood oil like the Australian Sandalwood essential oil we also use. Hopefully this helps and please let us know if you have any further questions or concerns.
Sincerely,
the DSH Team
 

lpp

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Feb 8, 2010
Thanks for the info., Mike - I think that Sandalwood, like most things, is definitely one where you get what you pay for, especially when buying online.
 

ahmir

Member
Apr 17, 2011
hi all, I just received my order of Dabur Sandalwood oil. Its strange but to me its a very smoky hot oil with low silage. I can even smell the rubber from the seal. People rave about how smooth and buttery dabur oil is. I find it the opposite. I am in no way implying that its not pure oil but can I be sure? Is this how its supposed to smell. I don't have much experience with sandalwood but the two others I smelt years ago were smooth sweet and lovely. This is not the same. I want to mix musk grains in it and if its not pure I don't want to waste the grains as they are very precious.

Also, As i poured the oil into a small vial I noticed it had a little water still not dried from when I washed it. The water has now mixed with the oil and you can see where it is as its cloudy. Will this spoil the oil over time or its not a problem?

thanks

Ahmir
 
Jul 14, 2013
I know this thread is five years old, but I just wanted to make a point about Santalum Album, aka "Mysore Sandalwood" for the benefit of anyone who might look to this thread as a reference.
The term "Mysore Sandalwood" was used in the late 19th century onwards to refer to White Sandalwood, aka "Santalum Album, which is indigenous throughout South East Asia and Australasia.
It was named thus because the primary exporter of White Sandalwood was the Raj, specifically the province of Mysore in British India, after the Maharajah of Mysore had set up a factory (now known as the Karnataka Govt Soap and Detergent Factory) to distill essential oil from this fragrant wood, the export of which was the main source of his private income.
This was back in the days when Britannia ruled the waves, and the other source of sandalwood and sandalwood oil was the colony of Western Australia, where the export industry in Santalum Spicatum (one of the fourteen varieties of sandalwood native to Australia) was created in the 1860s.
Sandalwood had countless applications, especially in luxury products, such as perfumery and was the traditional fragrance for gentlemen's cologne.
Trade in both these types of sandalwood was long established and worth a great deal to the exporters, whose products were known by their point of origin.
Mysore Sandalwood is not a region-specific variety of sandalwood, it is merely white sandalwood - Santalum Album - which can be found growing wild from China to Australia and everywhere in between.
Nowadays it is an anachronism to speak of "Mysore Sandalwood", because sandalwood in India is currently endangered - and after the Indian government introduced strict controls on the manufacture and export in sandalwood products in 2004, a rampant illegal trade sprang up and flourished, resulting in widespread corruption, numerous murders of forestry and customs officials and the rise of "bandit king" Veerappan whose greed and ruthlessness were legendary.
Santalum Album plays an integral role in rituals and ceremonies of the Hindu religion and domestic demand for sandalwood and sandalwood oil is so great that all sandalwood stocks and products were theoretically reserved for domestic consumption and it became illegal to export.
Money is a great motivator, however, and there are numerous unscrupulous producers willing to sell something alleged to be sandalwood oil to the unwary buyer, although it is still possible to buy reasonable quality sandalwood oil inside India itself - although comparatively the quality is vastly inferior to the export grade oils of the distant past.
In fact, as anyone who has been there can tell you, sandalwood oil and all sandalwood products manufactured by the government factory in Karnataka have artificial perfume oils added to them to standardise the scent profile since there is simply no quality aged heartwood availabl any more, and what there is is bought by agents representing extremely wealthy Indian buyers, as well buyers in Japan and the Middle East.
Apparently "Westerners" are largely seen as marks to be easily ripped off, unable to detect adulterated and synthetic oils.
Connoisseurs know that nowadays the centre of trade in quality sandalwood products is Singapore, since wild, old growth forests are still plentiful in Malaysia, Indonesia, China, Vietnam and Papua New Guinea, and the oils imported from these areas is infinitely superior to anything found in India.
A few years ago, perfumeries were once again able to source bulk Santalum Album oil after production of oil from the first harvest of ten year old plantation-growth Santalum Album from Kunnanurra in Western Australia, which now boasts more Santalum Album trees than anywhere else in the world.
Anyhow, if you want to buy real "Mysore Sandalwood" you won't find any pure authentic Santalum Album in Mysore/Karnataka and you'd be very lucky to find anything in India that hasn't had synthetic perfume oils or aroma chemicals added to it.
 

ahmir

Member
Apr 17, 2011
Thanks for the information Rowan,

Could you recommend a decent sandalwood oil like the Indian oil of lore then??
 

carlosrafael

Member
Jan 2, 2013
This morning I was comparing two essential oils that have both been sold to me as Mysore Sandalwood. Oil A has a smoother kind of smell to me. Oil B has more of a dry, jagged, scratchy, kind of "high-pitched" smell to it. Sorry if those aren't the best descriptive terms, but they're the ones that really spring to mind. Both oils smell in the right kind of ballpark for being Mysore in my (limited) understanding of that, and they both smell fairly similar. I spread drops of both oils on the backs of my hands, and then I actually had a shower, applied my SOTD and went about my business. After showering, I noticed that oil B had a much stronger smell than oil A, with more noticeable sillage as well. Oil A was still slightly present, but not nearly as much as oil B. So, Mysore experts, from this description, which oil would you think is more likely to be the real deal? My understanding is that Mysore (and quite possibly non-Mysore) sandalwood has quite low sillage, so does that mean that oil B is more likely to be adulterated?

A is typical of Mysore sandalwood. Typical and genuine Mysore sandalwood smells creamier (not dry and dusty) and smoother. It has a lower silage but it should last all day if the oil is genuine.
 

Vinrambo09

Well-known member
Jan 14, 2010
I know this thread is five years old, but I just wanted to make a point about Santalum Album, aka "Mysore Sandalwood" for the benefit of anyone who might look to this thread as a reference.
The term "Mysore Sandalwood" was used in the late 19th century onwards to refer to White Sandalwood, aka "Santalum Album, which is indigenous throughout South East Asia and Australasia.
It was named thus because the primary exporter of White Sandalwood was the Raj, specifically the province of Mysore in British India, after the Maharajah of Mysore had set up a factory (now known as the Karnataka Govt Soap and Detergent Factory) to distill essential oil from this fragrant wood, the export of which was the main source of his private income.
This was back in the days when Britannia ruled the waves, and the other source of sandalwood and sandalwood oil was the colony of Western Australia, where the export industry in Santalum Spicatum (one of the fourteen varieties of sandalwood native to Australia) was created in the 1860s.
Sandalwood had countless applications, especially in luxury products, such as perfumery and was the traditional fragrance for gentlemen's cologne.
Trade in both these types of sandalwood was long established and worth a great deal to the exporters, whose products were known by their point of origin.
Mysore Sandalwood is not a region-specific variety of sandalwood, it is merely white sandalwood - Santalum Album - which can be found growing wild from China to Australia and everywhere in between.
Nowadays it is an anachronism to speak of "Mysore Sandalwood", because sandalwood in India is currently endangered - and after the Indian government introduced strict controls on the manufacture and export in sandalwood products in 2004, a rampant illegal trade sprang up and flourished, resulting in widespread corruption, numerous murders of forestry and customs officials and the rise of "bandit king" Veerappan whose greed and ruthlessness were legendary.
Santalum Album plays an integral role in rituals and ceremonies of the Hindu religion and domestic demand for sandalwood and sandalwood oil is so great that all sandalwood stocks and products were theoretically reserved for domestic consumption and it became illegal to export.
Money is a great motivator, however, and there are numerous unscrupulous producers willing to sell something alleged to be sandalwood oil to the unwary buyer, although it is still possible to buy reasonable quality sandalwood oil inside India itself - although comparatively the quality is vastly inferior to the export grade oils of the distant past.
In fact, as anyone who has been there can tell you, sandalwood oil and all sandalwood products manufactured by the government factory in Karnataka have artificial perfume oils added to them to standardise the scent profile since there is simply no quality aged heartwood availabl any more, and what there is is bought by agents representing extremely wealthy Indian buyers, as well buyers in Japan and the Middle East.
Apparently "Westerners" are largely seen as marks to be easily ripped off, unable to detect adulterated and synthetic oils.
Connoisseurs know that nowadays the centre of trade in quality sandalwood products is Singapore, since wild, old growth forests are still plentiful in Malaysia, Indonesia, China, Vietnam and Papua New Guinea, and the oils imported from these areas is infinitely superior to anything found in India.
A few years ago, perfumeries were once again able to source bulk Santalum Album oil after production of oil from the first harvest of ten year old plantation-growth Santalum Album from Kunnanurra in Western Australia, which now boasts more Santalum Album trees than anywhere else in the world.
Anyhow, if you want to buy real "Mysore Sandalwood" you won't find any pure authentic Santalum Album in Mysore/Karnataka and you'd be very lucky to find anything in India that hasn't had synthetic perfume oils or aroma chemicals added to it.

Thats not true at all, there are government sponsored Sandalwood plantations and nurseries. As well many big fragrance houses like Dior, Guerlain have plantations for jasmine, vetiver and sandalwood in Southern India as well as Sri Lanka.
Mysore Sandalwood originates from that region and its very high in Santalol. Mysore Sandalwood does not randomly grow in SE Asia or Australia. They have to use the Indian cultivar for it. Chinese , SE Asian/New Caledonia , Australian sandalwood are region specific cultivars. None of those cultivars have no where near the same amount of santalol as the Mysore variety. Most of what you have written is BS , quite frankly.
 

cytherian

Well-known member
Nov 24, 2013
That post by Rowannicus was made on June 12th 2015, and he hasn't posted since. I take it he has forgotten about Basenotes. People who "post and flee" generally don't get much in the way of credibility anyway...

Those who procure sandalwood essential oils will have you believe that Mysore Sandalwood essential oil is always best and while Australian Santalum Album has similarities it still falls short. The misnomer here is that not all sandalwood is the same. There are variations from crop to crop, location to location. Probably not as dramatically different as oudh, but enough. And there's also the preparation, which can create variances.

From what I've read, the secret is in aging. And with Australia gaining older cultivars, eventually sandalwood essential oils sourced from there will be high enough grade to greatly please most people. The question is how much longer to wait. :)
 

akguy

Well-known member
Mar 29, 2011
I thought I would resurrect this Sandalwood Oil thread in order to share some observations on two Sandalwood essential oils that I purchased back in early 2011.

The first was a Tamil Nadu Santalum album oi, distilled in early 2009, which l purchased from online merchant Nature's Gift (USA). At the time of purchase, it had quite a muted aroma, of less complexity and especially of less strength than that of my benchmark 2000 Mysore, but after eight years of aging it has blossomed rather nicely, very creamy and elegant.

The second, and perhaps more interesting oil, is a Santalum austrocaledonicum from Vanuatu, which I purchased from online merchane Ananda Apothecary around the same time as the first oil (early 2011). At the time of purchase, this oil had a distinctly stronger but different aromatic profile than the S. album, creamy but with a somewhat harsh, dank, earthy note that lingered throughout most of the drydown. However, since then this oil has aged very well, having lost virtually all of that initial harshness, and with the creamy element being much more pronounced than when new --- I would almost call this oil "buttery", in the sense of the aroma a rich freshly-baked pastry right out of the oven. Its overall aroma is very much more intense than the Indian oil, although I would give the nod to the Indian oil in terms of elegance and refinement.

So, I have discovered that yes, indeed, again Sandalwood EOs is a project well worth the patience (and money!),
 

mikeperez23

Be Here. Now.
Basenotes Plus
Dec 31, 2006
I thought I would resurrect this Sandalwood Oil thread in order to share some observations on two Sandalwood essential oils that I purchased back in early 2011.

The first was a Tamil Nadu Santalum album oi, distilled in early 2009, which l purchased from online merchant Nature's Gift (USA). At the time of purchase, it had quite a muted aroma, of less complexity and especially of less strength than that of my benchmark 2000 Mysore, but after eight years of aging it has blossomed rather nicely, very creamy and elegant.

The second, and perhaps more interesting oil, is a Santalum austrocaledonicum from Vanuatu, which I purchased from online merchane Ananda Apothecary around the same time as the first oil (early 2011). At the time of purchase, this oil had a distinctly stronger but different aromatic profile than the S. album, creamy but with a somewhat harsh, dank, earthy note that lingered throughout most of the drydown. However, since then this oil has aged very well, having lost virtually all of that initial harshness, and with the creamy element being much more pronounced than when new --- I would almost call this oil "buttery", in the sense of the aroma a rich freshly-baked pastry right out of the oven. Its overall aroma is very much more intense than the Indian oil, although I would give the nod to the Indian oil in terms of elegance and refinement.

So, I have discovered that yes, indeed, again Sandalwood EOs is a project well worth the patience (and money!),

Great news - thanks for sharing that with us.
 

akguy

Well-known member
Mar 29, 2011
Thank you, Mike.

I have been mostly just a lurker here for the past eight years, realistically not having graduated to even a fragrance beginner, maybe barely just a proto-dilettante. But I did want to share what little I could with those here in this forum.
 

broguesforsir

Well-known member
Aug 19, 2012
I thought I would resurrect this Sandalwood Oil thread in order to share some observations on two Sandalwood essential oils that I purchased back in early 2011.

The first was a Tamil Nadu Santalum album oi, distilled in early 2009, which l purchased from online merchant Nature's Gift (USA). At the time of purchase, it had quite a muted aroma, of less complexity and especially of less strength than that of my benchmark 2000 Mysore, but after eight years of aging it has blossomed rather nicely, very creamy and elegant.

The second, and perhaps more interesting oil, is a Santalum austrocaledonicum from Vanuatu, which I purchased from online merchane Ananda Apothecary around the same time as the first oil (early 2011). At the time of purchase, this oil had a distinctly stronger but different aromatic profile than the S. album, creamy but with a somewhat harsh, dank, earthy note that lingered throughout most of the drydown. However, since then this oil has aged very well, having lost virtually all of that initial harshness, and with the creamy element being much more pronounced than when new --- I would almost call this oil "buttery", in the sense of the aroma a rich freshly-baked pastry right out of the oven. Its overall aroma is very much more intense than the Indian oil, although I would give the nod to the Indian oil in terms of elegance and refinement.

So, I have discovered that yes, indeed, again Sandalwood EOs is a project well worth the patience (and money!),

Thanks for sharing, akguy. That’s really encouraging to know.
 

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