Most powerful women attraction / magnetic perfumes

ain soph aur

Basenotes Member
Mar 31, 2021
Ok, the topic is:

Most powerful women attraction / magnetic perfumes
In your opinion which are the most powerful women attraction / magnetic perfumes you know?

I think it is clear, and there is no room for interpretation :ROFLMAO:
I vote for this:

View attachment 235263
i heard they tried adding one drop of chuck norris' sweat to this fragrance but the result was spontaneous combustion more powerful than 1000 exploding suns.
 

Lomaniac

Basenotes Dependent
Aug 4, 2014
If people are judging me based on my shoes I'm screwed. Unless New Balance finds a way to no longer be New Balance.
I've gotten tons of compliments on footwear from women. I chose shoes that I managed to still like and had read were also often appreciated by others. Same with shirts and suits. Same with focusing on areas for building muscle. Same with ways to stand, speak, and present myself. I'm still comfortable, but also more successful in interactions. Same thing works for fragrance. Actually have gotten compliments on different things at times when I was a bit uncomfortable with the extra attention. We can create that presentation. It can work even when we don't want it to.

But I've also owned many pairs of NB. Those get zip for compliments. And I have some stinky perfumes most other ppl don't like. I wear what I want for the reaction I want, because the distinction really exists and it really matters when we want it to matter.
 
Jul 7, 2012
Haven't been around Basenotes all that long, but this thread --whichever camp you're in--seems to be one for the ages.
This thread is nothing compared to some of the Basenotes classics... like the thread started by a guy who wore so much fragrance that the driver of the cab he was in literally stopped the car and got out... or the thread started by a guy who wanted to know if he'd get better sillage and projection if he sprayed his testicles. Oooooof.
 

strangelight

Basenotes Member
Jun 9, 2022
Honestly, if I knew or suspected a guy had asked this question I would find it a big turn off. I find it really off putting when men do things just to try and get women - like if they pretend to enjoy music or have opinions they think I'll agree with - it makes them look somewhat pathetic. Men that are relaxed, well groomed and confident enough to do their own thing are attractive.
However, I guess in a club environment (not my thing) I guess whatever's on those "top 10 panty dropper" lists on youtube may do the job. And out of the mass appealing masculines I've tried, Aventus is pretty nice, but it wouldn't draw me in - more like I can imagine it smelling nice on a guy I already like.
 

classics4me

always learning--often laughing
Feb 8, 2017
Honestly, if I knew or suspected a guy had asked this question I would find it a big turn off. I find it really off putting when men do things just to try and get women - like if they pretend to enjoy music or have opinions they think I'll agree with - it makes them look somewhat pathetic. Men that are relaxed, well groomed and confident enough to do their own thing are attractive.
However, I guess in a club environment (not my thing) I guess whatever's on those "top 10 panty dropper" lists on youtube may do the job. And out of the mass appealing masculines I've tried, Aventus is pretty nice, but it wouldn't draw me in - more like I can imagine it smelling nice on a guy I already like.
Well put. (y)
 
Jun 3, 2013
No idea what the lectures are about- seriously doubt OP thinks perfume is a substitute for a personality etc. It's just something to help him stand out, feel more confident and all that stuff. It's just like picking clothes to look attractive or choosing a hairstyle- the perfume will just be a part of your overall 'presentation'. Hence why a lot of us will have different scents for the office, different scents for just hanging at home, different scents for the beach... because you're trying to give off/experience a different vibe.

Original Aventus was a beast in terms of performance and getting compliments- never had anything like it since. The current batches of Aventus are... OK for as long as you can actually smell them. Would not recommend. Wasted too much money trying to chase the incredible original.

Any of the designer scents will do you well- they're popular for a reason.

I personally like to smell memorable- in that respect, Millesime Imperial or something similar would be fine. Not too niche, not too common- in fact, I generally don't notice a lot of Creed around me in general but that would vary from location to location, no doubt.

I would suggest wearing whatever you think smells nice- if you like it, it's very unlikely that everyone around you is going to hate it.
 

strangelight

Basenotes Member
Jun 9, 2022
No idea what the lectures are about- seriously doubt OP thinks perfume is a substitute for a personality etc. It's just something to help him stand out, feel more confident and all that stuff. It's just like picking clothes to look attractive or choosing a hairstyle- the perfume will just be a part of your overall 'presentation'. Hence why a lot of us will have different scents for the office, different scents for just hanging at home, different scents for the beach... because you're trying to give off/experience a different vibe.

Original Aventus was a beast in terms of performance and getting compliments- never had anything like it since. The current batches of Aventus are... OK for as long as you can actually smell them. Would not recommend. Wasted too much money trying to chase the incredible original.

Any of the designer scents will do you well- they're popular for a reason.

I personally like to smell memorable- in that respect, Millesime Imperial or something similar would be fine. Not too niche, not too common- in fact, I generally don't notice a lot of Creed around me in general but that would vary from location to location, no doubt.
I think the reasons for the "lectures" is that I (like many in this thread it seems) just think the idea of a fragrance being some thought of woman magnet is ridiculous and is best left to those cringe-worthy advertisements and youtube videos. You may find it merely semantics, but if he had phrased it more like "what fragrances tend to be popular with women", he might have gotten more useful responses.
Also, I'm also very skeptical about what people say are compliment getters, because it often people just compliment what stands out - like among women "I like your eyeshadow/lipstick" often means they've noticed you're wearing particularly loud colours. They may not dislike it, but it doesn't mean it's their favourite to see or what they think works best on you. Which is why a lot of those "beast mode" scents tend to net a lot of compliments. Maybe some women like it, but personally I find wearing a room-filling amount of fragrance somewhat obnoxious in most contexts even if I like the smell.
I would suggest wearing whatever you think smells nice- if you like it, it's very unlikely that everyone around you is going to hate it.
That we can agree on!
 

classics4me

always learning--often laughing
Feb 8, 2017
I think the reasons for the "lectures" is that I (like many in this thread it seems) just think the idea of a fragrance being some thought of woman magnet is ridiculous and is best left to those cringe-worthy advertisements and youtube videos. You may find it merely semantics, but if he had phrased it more like "what fragrances tend to be popular with women", he might have gotten more useful responses.
Also, I'm also very skeptical about what people say are compliment getters, because it often people just compliment what stands out - like among women "I like your eyeshadow/lipstick" often means they've noticed you're wearing particularly loud colours. They may not dislike it, but it doesn't mean it's their favourite to see or what they think works best on you. Which is why a lot of those "beast mode" scents tend to net a lot of compliments. Maybe some women like it, but personally I find wearing a room-filling amount of fragrance somewhat obnoxious in most contexts even if I like the smell.

That we can agree on!
I agree that compliments are not necessarily given because someone likes a fragrance--but often because a fragrance just happened to get noticed. Your makeup analogy is excellent. Yes, loud fragrances that fill a room--cringe. Personally, if someone compliments me, I automatically think I may have overapplied--which is unlikely as a very light sprayer. I do enjoy a "You smell nice" when being given a hug. That's a sure compliment.
 

Lomaniac

Basenotes Dependent
Aug 4, 2014
There are innumerable items that get compliments. People will find a reason to compliment you when they like you. It's a lot easier to compliment someone you like when they are also wearing/doing something you like. "You can really pull off that RBF during a catatonic state while wearing ugly ill-fitting clothes and generally smelling bad" is a big reach, even for the most enamored.
 

classics4me

always learning--often laughing
Feb 8, 2017
I've gotten tons of compliments on footwear from women. I chose shoes that I managed to still like and had read were also often appreciated by others. Same with shirts and suits. Same with focusing on areas for building muscle. Same with ways to stand, speak, and present myself. I'm still comfortable, but also more successful in interactions. Same thing works for fragrance. Actually have gotten compliments on different things at times when I was a bit uncomfortable with the extra attention. We can create that presentation. It can work even when we don't want it to.

But I've also owned many pairs of NB. Those get zip for compliments. And I have some stinky perfumes most other ppl don't like. I wear what I want for the reaction I want, because the distinction really exists and it really matters when we want it to matter.
Just curious. Do you ever wear a fragrance, pair of shoes or other clothing just for yourself, for personal enjoyment --not even caring if it gets a reaction or not?
 

Lomaniac

Basenotes Dependent
Aug 4, 2014
Just curious. Do you ever wear a fragrance, pair of shoes or other clothing just for yourself, for personal enjoyment --not even caring if it gets a reaction or not?
That's what I meant by the last sentence. I do that much, much, much more often than I dress to impress. But to me, it's the difference between caring and not. Wearing "for myself" means putting on whatever comfortable clothing is at hand and 99.9% of the time also means not bothering to apply fragrance. I don't really wear anything nice for myself, clothes for me are pure utility. It takes effort to look like it was effortless (ie not a tryhard). Which also means dressing to "impress" is also a the result of working towards the function of utility, a goal in the social space. I'm at the age where socks & sandals still looks terrible, but it's so easy to just not care what strangers think when I'm on errands. While I will happily go out on errands in t-shirts with holes in them, I also have a Halston tux with a Thomas Pink pique bib shirt, and nine other suits.

When I want to smell something nice, I light a candle at home. I don't like to wear enough that other people notice at more than arms length, and anosmia comes quickly if I make it too easy to smell myself.
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
I'm also very skeptical about what people say are compliment getters, because it often people just compliment what stands out - like among women "I like your eyeshadow/lipstick" often means they've noticed you're wearing particularly loud colours. They may not dislike it, but it doesn't mean it's their favourite to see or what they think works best on you. Which is why a lot of those "beast mode" scents tend to net a lot of compliments. Maybe some women like it, but personally I find wearing a room-filling amount of fragrance somewhat obnoxious in most contexts even if I like the smell.
I agree that compliments are not necessarily given because someone likes a fragrance--but often because a fragrance just happened to get noticed. Your makeup analogy is excellent. Yes, loud fragrances that fill a room--cringe. Personally, if someone compliments me, I automatically think I may have overapplied--which is unlikely as a very light sprayer. I do enjoy a "You smell nice" when being given a hug. That's a sure compliment.
People will find a reason to compliment you when they like you. It's a lot easier to compliment someone you like when they are also wearing/doing something you like.

Exactly. Compliments can, of course, be sincere, but they're as likely to be either semi-sincere or a deflection of some kind. Regardless of precise intent, it's a way of calling out the most noticeable thing about you—or perhaps the least offensive noticeable thing.

In a club environment, where virtually everyone is exuding either a lot of strong fragrance or a lot of BO, "I like your cologne/perfume" is unlikely to mean you have somehow chosen the best fragrance in the room. Possibly the loudest, although that's going to be one hell of a contest, especially since, if you've chosen a popular clubbing scent, anywhere from 10–50% of the "competition" is wearing the same thing. More likely, someone is grasping for an opening line because they like something else about you, and "I like your fragrance" is risk-averse flattery (unless the recipient hasn't worn any). It's an environment in which it's difficult to tell who's worn what, so a specific fragrance choice is unlikely to be a deal-maker, or even a deal-breaker, though the latter is more plausible.

If you've worn a lot of "beastly" fragrance, it's rather like @strangelight's analogy of having worn a loud lipstick, or loud anything. For one thing, it's noticeable. For another, the assumption is that you went with that choice because you really, really like that color/scent/article of clothing, so it's the logical target for a come-on (as opposed to, say, "you look rich," or, "nice tits!"). If someone feels obligated to be nice to you even though they're not really interested—like when you're both serving as wing-person to your more attractive/assertive friend—"nice fragrance" could be a polite way to avoid saying, "no way in hell."

Fragrance choice is going to matter much more on a date than in a club. And even then, it's orders of magnitude more likely to be a deal-breaker than deal-maker. Forget the ads: no one is going to have sex with you because you chose the exact right fragrance. At least, not unless they're so insane that you'd be better off if they didn't.
 

Lomaniac

Basenotes Dependent
Aug 4, 2014
This thread lasted a lot longer than the OP who hasn't checked in since mid May....wait, maybe OP tried one of the fragrances mentioned in the thread and voila! He is so busy with his harem there hasn't been time to post an update with gratitude for the helpful advice.
Probably found a more appropriate forum to ask. The only problem OP had was asking here. There are places where dating and relationship talk is the focus (no, I don't care about those pua places), and fragrance would fall under that as part of the image one presents. Here, people think fragrance stands on it's own and can't place it as part of a fit. Fragrance also somehow does nothing to others while posters wax poetic about how infinitely powerful it is on the wearer's senses, outlook, emotional state, memory etc. Many have been hoodwinked by the literal thousands of posts on the most complimented threads (pinned at that), the thousands of times the word sexy has been used in reviews and discussions, only to be told fragrance doesn't actually do any of that when they ask directly. Weird how powerful fragrance is to others, until one asks how powerful fragrance is on others.

Personally, I don't believe it has much effect anyway. Either it smells nice or it doesn't, but I've never seen it trigger much beyond a comment, which only comes along other similar comments, together being good or bad.
 

Sheik Yerbouti

oakmoss fiend
Basenotes Plus
Jul 20, 2017
The OP asked a question and I don’t really understand why so many people think fragrance has nothing to do with attraction. I think something is being missed by many on the thread. We aren’t a bunch of sexless automatons. (Not yet anyway but with the pushes in AI and for man to become augmented with machinery who knows....anyway I digress.)

Most people don’t buy a fragrance to just sniff the sprayer. People use fragrance as a way to make themselves more confident or appear more attractive, much of the time to a potential mate. If anyone thinks fragrance is completely devoid of that or that it’s a bad idea to ask a fragrance related question on a Fragrance Forum or which fragrances might garner compliments they need a reality check. We are people after all. The problem with a forum environment is that people can become too caught up in their groupthink and can’t see the wood for the trees and temporarily suspend what is happening in the real world.
It might seem like a juvenille question but maybe some of the people that ask are juvenilles.

And to break the spell...

Some truth that some may not want to hear but, people all do fu** and guess what, they like it. We are sensory creatures; if we like the way someone looks, and sounds when they speak, when we like what they say and how they laugh, their touch, is it a stretch to imagine that we might also enjoy how they, and/or their fragrance, might smell?

Don’t make the mistake of underestimating the importance of smelling good. It’s subjective to a degree yes, but bathing and putting on a fragrance will always be preferable to and more attractive than bad hygiene.

One last thing. Most people discuss fragrance in terms of one-off interactions like going to a club or bar but no one ever talks about someone you might see everyday at your job, or college etc and how wearing scent might have an effect over an extended period of time.
 
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classics4me

always learning--often laughing
Feb 8, 2017
The OP asked a question and I don’t really understand why so many people think fragrance has nothing to do with attraction. I think something is being missed by many on the thread. We aren’t a bunch of sexless automatons. (Not yet anyway but with the pushes in AI and for man to become augmented with machinery who knows....anyway I digress.)

Most people don’t buy a fragrance to just sniff the sprayer. People use fragrance as a way to make themselves more confident or appear more attractive, much of the time to a potential mate. If anyone thinks fragrance is completely devoid of that or that it’s a bad idea to ask a fragrance related question on a Fragrance Forum or which fragrances might garner compliments they need a reality check. We are people after all. The problem with a forum environment is that people can become too caught up in their groupthink and can’t see the wood for the trees and temporarily suspend what is happening in the real world.
It might seem like a juvenille question but maybe some of the people that ask are juvenilles.

And to break the spell...

Some truth that some may not want to hear but, people all do fuck and guess what, they like it. We are sensory creatures; if we like the way someone looks, and sounds when they speak, when we like what they say and how they laugh, their touch, is it a stretch to imagine that we might also enjoy how they, and/or their fragrance, might smell?

Don’t make the mistake of underestimating the importance of smelling good. It’s subjective to a degree yes, but bathing and putting on a fragrance will always be preferable to and more attractive than bad hygiene.

One last thing. Most people discuss fragrance in terms of one-off interactions like going to a club or bar but no one ever talks about someone you might see everyday at your job, or college etc and how wearing scent might have an effect over an extended period of time.
I'm out. Peace to both sides in this discussion. :)
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
I don’t really understand why so many people think fragrance has nothing to do with attraction.

I don’t think most people think that. It’s just a matter of how so, how much, and in what context.

…bathing and putting on a fragrance will always be preferable to and more attractive than bad hygiene.

This, for sure.

Most people discuss fragrance in terms of one-off interactions like going to a club or bar but no one ever talks about someone you might see everyday at your job, or college etc and how wearing scent might have an effect over an extended period of time.

Yes, but this isn’t what most people like the OP ask about. Besides, the overall point of many responses remains the same: there isn’t a fragrance that’s going to net reliable romantic results, at least not generically.

It’s like asking, “what hairstyle do women like?” It depends on both the tastes of the particular woman and the hair and face of the particular man. If you have Jonah Hill’s face, it’s not going to help you to cop Johnny Depp’s coif, especially if she’s looking for Idris Elba. But, you still want a good haircut.

This is why I encourage people who ask to work from what they like rather than from some specious list of “panty-droppers” in a web forum. It’s not that smelling good doesn’t matter or doesn’t help; it’s that no one can tell from your post (even with a picture and self-written personality profile) what’s going to be effective for you.

That, and while applied fragrance does matter, its effects tend be exaggerated. I don’t think any woman ever said, “He’s hideous and obnoxious, but that cologne—swoon! I just had to fu** him.” It’s only part of a larger picture.

So, wear a fragrance that smells like you—however you perceive yourself to be—and you’ll be much better off than wearing something that smells like part of an agenda. A woman (or man) is probably going to decide to be intimate with you because of whatever it is about you that they feel makes you special. That being so, what impression would it make for you to wear what everyone else is wearing?
 
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Sheik Yerbouti

oakmoss fiend
Basenotes Plus
Jul 20, 2017
I don't know about you, but I wouldn't be interested in a woman who wanted to sleep with me because of my 6 pack abs, nice clothes, appealing voice, or fragrance. That would be my definition of shallow. Might help for a one night stand--but real, lasting relationships--I sincerely doubt, have much or anything to do with looks, smell or style. Character, personality, humor, kindness and communication skills surely trump every "panty dropper"--and all fragrances--combined. But, we are all different.

I think you’ve missed the point of what I said. I won’t be drawn into a back and forth with you about this so I hope you don’t just have a knee-jerk reaction to what I say below.

I don’t care one iota about all the virtue signalling that goes on in forums, so what I say I say regardless of whether someone reading might think good of it or bad.

The things I mentioned regarding the way someone looks, sounds, smells etc were regarding the sensory side, the externality of the person. We can find these things attractive about someone right? That includes smell. That doesn’t place smell above all else. Those sensory qualities aren’t mutually exclusive to kindness, personality, humour etc. If someone has a sense of humour would I hold it against them if they have 6 pack abs? No and why should I.
Be honest all else being equal, great personality, humour, kindness - would you be more attracted to someone that smells good or someone that smells bad?

If you want to think in terms of Panty Droppers that’s up to you but remember one thing, the OPs question could have been worded better but he didn’t use the term and neither did I. Like I said in an earlier post, it might just be juvenile.

Don’t be so quick to jump from extreme to extreme and don’t make the mistake of thinking someone that smells good and is physically fit can’t have great personality and be kind.

We don’t fit into neat stereotypes.

Have a great week.
 

Rodolfo

Basenotes Junkie
Jun 2, 2008
I would just like to make two minor and passing comments. I have been reading Basenotes for more than 15 years and I have come across this type of thread many times. I have to say that many times the author of the thread seems like a newcomer, and of a young age. So the way of asking (magnetic, chick, panty dropper, etc) is usually part of a cliché and as PStoller said long ago, it is caricatured. However, what is being asked may be understandable to a certain extent, well removed from a dogma.

That said, I'm sure a lot of people don't know that in the Masculine Fragrance section there is a pinned thread (the first one) titled "Which scent gets you the most compliments? Pt.2" with 9 pages and more than 300 answers that is an extension to its first part, which contains 278 pages and more than 11,000 posts where suggestions and juicy anecdotes from Basenotes members are related. Something that I consider more instructive, entertaining and interesting than making a list with names in a continuous maelstrom of thread clones.
 

Andylalal

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Feb 2, 2022
My frags are for my enjoyment. In the 90’s tho I was all about the gas station fragrances that contained alluring pheromones which guarantee triggered attraction from the opposite sex. Powerful stuff.
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
The things I mentioned regarding the way someone looks, sounds, smells etc were regarding the sensory side, the externality of the person. We can find these things attractive about someone right? That includes smell. That doesn’t place smell above all else. Those sensory qualities aren’t mutually exclusive to kindness, personality, humour etc. If someone has a sense of humour would I hold it against them if they have 6 pack abs? No and why should I.

I think this is healthy way of viewing things. And, in truth, most of us are first attracted to someone by external factors. It's just that, for a variety of reasons, scent is usually not an overriding positive in the way that appearance is. It's in our biology that our sense of sight especially is more acute than our sense of smell, which, while complex, is not nearly so developed as in most other mammals.

I would never advocate neglecting smell and fragrance, least of all here. It's just the idea of deploying fragrance as a mating tool where one product reigns supreme that I decry. There are solid general principles: I should hope we all know that we'll stand a better chance smelling like fresh lemons than like rotting cabbage. The rest is, at best, synergy; at worst, marketing.
 

classics4me

always learning--often laughing
Feb 8, 2017
I think you’ve missed the point of what I said. I won’t be drawn into a back and forth with you about this so I hope you don’t just have a knee-jerk reaction to what I say below.

I don’t care one iota about all the virtue signalling that goes on in forums, so what I say I say regardless of whether someone reading might think good of it or bad.

The things I mentioned regarding the way someone looks, sounds, smells etc were regarding the sensory side, the externality of the person. We can find these things attractive about someone right? That includes smell. That doesn’t place smell above all else. Those sensory qualities aren’t mutually exclusive to kindness, personality, humour etc. If someone has a sense of humour would I hold it against them if they have 6 pack abs? No and why should I.
Be honest all else being equal, great personality, humour, kindness - would you be more attracted to someone that smells good or someone that smells bad?

If you want to think in terms of Panty Droppers that’s up to you but remember one thing, the OPs question could have been worded better but he didn’t use the term and neither did I. Like I said in an earlier post, it might just be juvenile.

Don’t be so quick to jump from extreme to extreme and don’t make the mistake of thinking someone that smells good and is physically fit can’t have great personality and be kind.

We don’t fit into neat stereotypes.

Have a great week.
No back and forth. Your points are well taken, and I respect your views. :)
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
This is exactly the problem in this topic.

Yesterday in the bank, I smelled a lady from meters away.
It was an extremely sweet and powerful, candied perfume.
Very arousing.

But I'm sure it doesn't work the other way around.

And would you have asked her out on that basis if you didn't think she was pretty? Did you?

That's the problem with this topic. It's not that people think fragrance has no effect. It's that they exaggerate the ultimate effect it has.
 

Suppressor

Basenotes Dependent
Dec 7, 2006
And would you have asked her out on that basis if you didn't think she was pretty? Did you?

That's the problem with this topic. It's not that people think fragrance has no effect. It's that they exaggerate the ultimate effect it has.

The wording may be a bit exaggerated yes, but that's no reason to make drama over it.

As I said, this should be a fun topic. Tongue-in-cheek.
Calm down.

My Acqua di Ketchup Profumo Tomato works good btw.
 

Hugh V.

Basenotes Dependent
Dec 9, 2016
In your opinion which are the most powerful women attraction / magnetic perfumes you know?

:)
It depends on the era.

I remember when Curve and Acqua di Gio were compliment getters and girls were crazy about the scents. This was around 2000-2005.

Around 2010-2015 it was Sauvage, Bleu de Chanel, 1 Million, and Invictus.

Pretty much, whatever is mass appealing and in fashion at the moment. I don't even like the style of 1 Million of Invictus, but even I have to admit it was a new and exciting scent. Imagine what a woman is going to think about it.

Polo was once something women really loved back in the early 1980s. Now women probably think it's a stinky man smell.
 

classics4me

always learning--often laughing
Feb 8, 2017
And would you have asked her out on that basis if you didn't think she was pretty? Did you?

That's the problem with this topic. It's not that people think fragrance has no effect. It's that they exaggerate the ultimate effect it has.

And would you have asked her out on that basis if you didn't think she was pretty? Did you?

That's the problem with this topic. It's not that people think fragrance has no effect. It's that they exaggerate the ultimate effect it has.
Bingo
 

andym72

Basenotes Dependent
Dec 19, 2008
The most you’re going to get is “that cologne you’ve got on smells really nice”.

But make no mistake,, they are referring to the stuff that came out of a bottle that you sprayed on.

It’s kinda insulting to women to think that they would treat that wondrous smell as inherently a part of you!

No different than “that shirt looks nice on you”, complimenting the shirt, and your good taste in picking a shirt that suited you.

Having said that, I’ve had almost universal “oh that smells great on a guy” feedback for TF Noir Extreme.
 

FOXHOUND

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Jan 14, 2022
Jan 18, 2020
When I was in 9th grade, rumor had it that Drakkar Noir had pheromones in it. In 10th or 11th grade, supposedly CK Eternity contained pheromones. I rocked both of them during those years and did ok for myself, so it must have been true. Course, this was the early 90s, and allegedly Doritos also had pheromones in them.

I would suggest layering Drakkar and Eternity and munching some Doritos when out in public.
 

ChuckW

Basenotes Institution
Aug 21, 2001
I go back almost 40 years in this game. Cologne enhances attraction when properly worn. This is my direct experience. When I wore the original Kouros in the mid 80s there was an almost visceral reaction from others. Undeniably positive.

Kouros, GIT, Aventus are the all-timers in this department for me.
 

andym72

Basenotes Dependent
Dec 19, 2008
I've never heard it called "Washing Up Liquid." What country is that?

Is that a common way to refer to what we in the US call dish soap or dish washing detergent?
It’s from the UK.

Instead of the US phrase “do the dishes”, we said “washing up the dishes”, since “washing up” used to be a common phrase meaning to clean (yourself) at the end of a mucky job. And cleaning the dishes is at the end of a meal, so theres this common idea of cleaning at the end of doing something.

Over time, the meaning has changed so that “washing up” these days means the stack of dirty dishes themselves 😉 So we get odd things like “look at all this washing up that needs doing”.

I just checked the bottle by the sink, it says Dishwashing Liquid. But everyone calls it Washing Up Liquid.
 

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