List and rate the tobacco frags you've worn

Emanuel76

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2018
Darvant said:
Acqua Flor - La Habana

A wonderful old-school in style aromatic tobacco with a classy virile aura and a fresh "toiletries-like" impact. La Habana is a really classy neo-classic "vintage in inspiration" creation from the talented performer Sileno Cheloni. Aqua Flor is a florentine house of artistic perfumes based in Florence and located in a historic Renaissance palace in the district of Santa Croce. Aqua Flor is also a workshop which offers to visitors and passionates special olfactory tours and olfactive sensorial journeys (and the possibility to commission the creation of your bespoke fragrance according with your personal wishes). La Habana smells like an old traditional barber-shop located in the historical district of the Zocalo in Mexico City or in some elegant neighborhoods of the old Buenos Aires. This fragrance is all about a "cigars-smoking" latin american gentleman white-linen suited and with aromatized moustache. The note of lavender is by soon heady and perfectly combined with subtle green notes and soft hesperides. The general initial vibe is woodsy, aromatic-fougère (with mossy traits) and somewhat cologney. The note of lavender is throughout present with its cool green-floral touch of manneristic barber-shop classicism. I suppose hints of neroli could be included in the blend. The gradually growing up and soon dominant note of tobacco is anyway (not properly ashy or particularly smoky but) freshly leafy, hesperidic, "perfumed" and aromatic (with soft angular masculine traits, some woodsy muskiness and gentle ambery/woody undertones). Along the way the combination of amber, woods and musks provides a denser virile aura which is anyway quite balanced and finally kind of restrained. The overall effect is at same time soapy/aromatic and virile (with rougher traits never out of the schemes), an impeccable gentleman's creation for the lovers of tradition and measure.

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Emanuel76

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2018
David Jourquin - Cuir Tabac

Hot day.

A musky-patchouly centric fragrance with lavender, spices, suede-tobacco, resins and mild sweetness.
In the first part the patchouli is close to Farmacia SS Annunziata - Patchouly Indonesiano, but smoothened by musk and complemented by other ingredients.
In the second part it resembles Il Profvmo - Patchouli Noir, but not as creamy.

Underwhelmed at first, because I expected something else. But I quickly fell in love with it.
Probably in cold weather it will be even better.
Awesome!

Penible "luxury" wannabe bottle with its loose leather pijamas.
Wasted 100 Euros ("luxury" bottle vs standard bottle).

9/10

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Amouage - Boundless

Sort of Aramis - Tobacco Reserve with cypriol/nagarmotha, animalic musk and patchouly.
Underwhelmed.

7.5/10


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Hey Man

Well-known member
Sep 22, 2006
Does anyone know if there are any other new tobacco fragrances coming out in 2021/2022?

In terms of mainstream or designer fragrances, it seems that tobacco has sort of run it's course for now - when a few years back, it almost seemed like everyone was coming out with a tobacco fragrance.
 

Andy the frenchy

Well-known member
Sep 16, 2018
[...]
Amouage - Boundless

Sort of Aramis - Tobacco Reserve with cypriol/nagarmotha, animalic musk and patchouly.
Underwhelmed.

7.5/10
[...]

Tried this one recently in Paris, and like you, I was underwhelmed.


Does anyone know if there are any other new tobacco fragrances coming out in 2021/2022?

In terms of mainstream or designer fragrances, it seems that tobacco has sort of run it's course for now - when a few years back, it almost seemed like everyone was coming out with a tobacco fragrance.

No way to know. But I agree with you that many mainstream luxury brands have their take on tobacco. Unfortunately , most of the time it's that sweet honeyed interpretation, and often underwhelming and not close to the real deal.
 

Castingshadows

Well-known member
Apr 14, 2020
Jinko Store just released an unreal tobacco composition called Vanilla Paradise.

Vanilla Paradise for me is a perfect 10/10 in how it constructs multiple tobacco accords and raw absolutes/macerations to achieve pipe AND cigar tobacco. Vanilla Paradise is in Attar format and is all natural but it boasts over 50 materials including an amazing banana Co2 opening that creates a ‘fresh out the pouch’ vibe of spiced, loose leaf flavored tobacco. If anyone is familiar with Banana swishers this is IDENTICAL to that aroma.

As the fragrance progresses a dark coffee note emerges along with a POWERFUL chewy tobacco note that combines gently with Vanilla, (real) aged Cambodian Oud, and castoreum among many other animalics that never feel offensive but rather boost performance.

Vanilla Paradise easily lasts over 18 hours on the skin with strong projection the first 6-8 hours. The drydown is reminiscent of Agar de Noir or Russian Oud in that its ambery, tobacco filled vanilla that’s furry in texture but never cloyingly sweet.

Overall I’d say this does the job of providing a crowd pleasing tobacco scent that’s all natural and jam packed with actual tobacco absolutes and macerations without feeling like it’s a supporting note or even a fantasy accord. It’s real. It’s lucid and honestly it beats out Sultan Pasha’s Tabac Grande.
 

MegaMav

Well-known member
Dec 12, 2013
Tried Lorenzo Villaresi's Atman Xaman EDT, own a bottle.
Not as great as the sparkling reviews give it here.
Decent oriental spicy fragrance.
More like Michael Kors Michael Vintage than Histoires de Parfums 1740 as claimed.
It's like Michael Kors Michael without the "designer" amber note.

I've give Michael a 6.0 as a tobacco and Atman Xaman a 6.5.

Tops for me still stand at Speakeasy at 9.0, Odori Tabacco at 9.5.
1740 (vintage ornate cap bottle) as a tobacco fragrance I'd give it a 7.5, as a composition about a 9.
 

freewheelingvagabond

Well-known member
Jun 10, 2012
Tried Lorenzo Villaresi's Atman Xaman EDT, own a bottle.
Not as great as the sparkling reviews give it here.
Decent oriental spicy fragrance.
More like Michael Kors Michael Vintage than Histoires de Parfums 1740 as claimed.
It's like Michael Kors Michael without the "designer" amber note.

I've give Michael a 6.0 as a tobacco and Atman Xaman a 6.5.

Tops for me still stand at Speakeasy at 9.0, Odori Tabacco at 9.5.
1740 (vintage ornate cap bottle) as a tobacco fragrance I'd give it a 7.5, as a composition about a 9.

Odori Tabacco was awesome, I missed out on getting a bottle.
I once tried Speakeasy at a store but it didn't make too much of an impression.
 

Andy the frenchy

Well-known member
Sep 16, 2018
1740 (vintage ornate cap bottle) as a tobacco fragrance I'd give it a 7.5, as a composition about a 9.

Same thoughts here.

Tops for me still stand at Speakeasy at 9.0, Odori Tabacco at 9.5.

Odori Tabacco was awesome, I missed out on getting a bottle.
I once tried Speakeasy at a store but it didn't make too much of an impression.

Only have current version of Odori, and didn't strike me. Very sweet/honeyed, more than tobacco to my nose.
I also tried Speakeasy a couple of time, soft, rounded, too well behaved and poor projection. Not fbw for me. Furthermore I see it as a boozy frag, not a tobacco one. Couldn;t spot any distinct tobacco note in it, and indeed, I did not include it in my tobacco ranking.

Tried Lorenzo Villaresi's Atman Xaman EDT, own a bottle.
Not as great as the sparkling reviews give it here.
Decent oriental spicy fragrance.
More like Michael Kors Michael Vintage than Histoires de Parfums 1740 as claimed.

:::scratches head:::

I will have to join Brooks in scratching my head about that statement.
 

MegaMav

Well-known member
Dec 12, 2013
I will have to join Brooks in scratching my head about that statement.
:::scratches head:::

I terms of references in this thread made, I said closer to one than the other.
The way the tobacco presents itself as leathery, I think its closer to Michael than the decadently sweet, thick-as-a-brick vintage 1740 I own.
I think Atman Xaman EDT is weak sauce. Near zero depth or complexity. I can see why Turin panned Villoresi.
I wont be seeking out the EDP.

Diversity of opinion is healthy for intelligent discussion, gentlemen.
 

slpfrsly

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 1, 2019
I terms of references in this thread made, I said closer to one than the other.
The way the tobacco presents itself as leathery, I think its closer to Michael than the decadently sweet, thick-as-a-brick vintage 1740 I own.
I think Atman Xaman EDT is weak sauce. Near zero depth or complexity. I can see why Turin panned Villoresi.
I wont be seeking out the EDP.

Diversity of opinion is healthy for intelligent discussion.

Indeed. Your opinion is entirely reasonable and fair. Don't feel the need to justify it to anyone who wants/needs to have their own opinions of said fragrance validated by the internet. If one invests any amount of value in the hive mind, or 'fragrances-as-ideas', then they're going to fight tooth and nail against any narrative or opinion that runs counter to their own. Basically, if you find that an honestly expressed opinion leads to gnashing and wailing - it's not your fault. Don't be hectored in to remaining quiet, nor feel like you need to compromise. The problem isn't yours. Investing any serious amount of care in to what someone else says about a fragrance on the internet - or, if one's own enjoyment of a fragrance can be changed by what other people say about it on the internet - is clearly not a good way to go about things. Your opinion is reasonable and fair. You're not the problem.

I agree with your assessment, for what it's worth. It's an incredibly leathery scent. I would say it's complex and has depth, though, as it is layered - but it's like stagnant cigar smoke mixed with pot pourri. The first time I tried it, it reminded me of my grandparent's house. Not my idea of a wearable fragrance. Kors is the more pleasing alternative on the same theme, swapping grass and herbs for the sharp pines and firs. I can see why you've linked the two.
 

MegaMav

Well-known member
Dec 12, 2013
Indeed. Your opinion is entirely reasonable and fair. Don't feel the need to justify it to anyone who wants/needs to have their own opinions of said fragrance validated by the internet. If one invests any amount of value in the hive mind, or 'fragrances-as-ideas', then they're going to fight tooth and nail against any narrative or opinion that runs counter to their own. Basically, if you find that an honestly expressed opinion leads to gnashing and wailing - it's not your fault. Don't be hectored in to remaining quiet, nor feel like you need to compromise. The problem isn't yours. Investing any serious amount of care in to what someone else says about a fragrance on the internet - or, if one's own enjoyment of a fragrance can be changed by what other people say about it on the internet - is clearly not a good way to go about things. Your opinion is reasonable and fair. You're not the problem.

I agree with your assessment, for what it's worth. It's an incredibly leathery scent. I would say it's complex and has depth, though, as it is layered - but it's like stagnant cigar smoke mixed with pot pourri. The first time I tried it, it reminded me of my grandparent's house. Not my idea of a wearable fragrance. Kors is the more pleasing alternative on the same theme, swapping grass and herbs for the sharp pines and firs. I can see why you've linked the two.

I appreciate that. Thank you.

I rub some the wrong way on here because I have no issue expressing my opinion even if it goes against the group-think grain.
I think Atman Xaman a decent soliflore, right in there with Demeter's Pipe Tobacco (6.0-6.5), but at 5x the price.
I'd go as far as to say Pipe Tobacco presents the complexity of honeyed tobacco absolute better than Atman Xaman.
Atman Xaman has a few more bit players thrown in with dabs of non-descript hesperidics, curried immortelle and soft tonka.
Nothing earth shattering to me.

Observation: There is an "appreciated rarity" that goes on with Basenotes and other collectable hobbies where "I have it and you dont, so it's much better than everything else".
See: DHI & LIDGE when they were more exclusive, hard to find. They were "the berries", then manufacturing met the demand and now they're nearly forgotten, scoffed at. I dont think either has changed much, if at all, even with the crocodile tears when the packaging was changed on both.

I dont get this hobby sometimes.
 

Brooks Otterlake

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Feb 12, 2019
To me, 1740 is an immortelle-and-leather scent both in its vintage and current formulation (I've owned both). I similarly find Atman Xaman to be an immortelle-and-leather scent. Tobacco is not at the center of either (and I get no tobacco in 1740 at all).

Both 1740 and AX have a slightly musty element. Ghislain has an affection for a sort of "old book" mustiness, and it runs throughout a lot of the HdP lineup. The musty component in 1740 feels a bit like a grand library, while Atman Xaman feels more "country house" to me (I think that comparison comes from Darvant).

1740 is dense and opulent, Atman Xaman is aromatic and relaxed. If I were to recommend a tobacco fragrance that echoes 1740's dense opulence, it would be Masque Montecristo, which has something of 1740's hedonism even if it's otherwise different.

Vintage Michael for Men strikes me as being a different animal than any of the above due to its emphasis on plum and sticky dried fruit that gives it its signature accord, and the salty-fir component that borders on feeling briny/marine. The urinous tobacco in the base of Michael strikes me as fairly unique, even in niche fragrances; the closest thing I've found to it is Remy Latour Cigar Commander. The suede in Michael for Men is the plush/luxe sort that one finds more vividly realized in some of the Bottega Veneta fragrances.
 

slpfrsly

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 1, 2019
I appreciate that. Thank you.

I rub some the wrong way on here because I have no issue expressing my opinion even if it goes against the group-think grain.
I think Atman Xaman a decent soliflore, right in there with Demeter's Pipe Tobacco (6.0-6.5), but at 5x the price.
I'd go as far as to say Pipe Tobacco presents the complexity of honeyed tobacco absolute better than Atman Xaman.
Atman Xaman has a few more bit players thrown in with dabs of non-descript hesperidics, curried immortelle and soft tonka.
Nothing earth shattering to me.

Observation: There is an "appreciated rarity" that goes on with Basenotes and other collectable hobbies where "I have it and you dont, so it's much better than everything else".
See: DHI & LIDGE when they were more exclusive, hard to find. They were "the berries", then manufacturing met the demand and now they're nearly forgotten, scoffed at. I dont think either has changed much, if at all, even with the crocodile tears when the packaging was changed on both.

I dont get this hobby sometimes.

Not a problem. Fora are not (and should not be) safe spaces for those who want to restrict other people from sharing and discussing a range of perfectly acceptable views, simply because those views challenge their own beliefs or opinions. Unfortunately, that's not universally accepted. These types of websites should be places built on mutual respect and tolerance - which means tolerating things you dislike from time to time. Clearly, you haven't received either respect or tolerance. As such, you don't have to justify your opinion, qualify it, backtrack, and certainly not submit, just because someone disagrees with you. Don't feel or think like you've done anything wrong. You haven't.

I haven't tried Demeter's Pipe Tobacco so cannot pass any judgement on the comparison. What I can say, however, is that I'm more than happy with Michael by Michael Kors as a tobacco-based fragrance. After sampling near enough all the tobacco on the market (sans the Demeters, which perhaps I ought to have sampled!) I can honestly say I don't think there is a tobacco fragrance that does anything more than a 'decent' job of conveying the aroma of true tobacco. I've been (occasionally) enjoying the real thing for the last 6 months or so now - in cigar and pipe form - and it simply reinforced what I have come to accept: a great tobacco fragrance just doesn't exist.

Tobacco absolute doesn't last very long at all in comparison to other rich/dark compounds or aromachemicals, which is a problem for fragrances if your main aroma is fading away around the 3 hour mark. This seems to be why so many perfumers (with no small amount of skill, it should be said) effectively 'cheat' by bolstering the tobacco depending on the direction they want to go: thick, gloopy, aromatic tobacco will be imitated with honeys, vanillas, sugars, and ambers, and perhaps a dash of fruit like osmanthus, as in Herod or Chicago High. Or there's clove, which adds a spicy, slightly smoked, dry-aromatic edge that extends tobacco absolute, dries it out, gives it more of an edge. Paired with the aforementioned honey, you get Tom Ford's Tobacco Vanille by including clove, which is really quite genius and I've come to appreciate it more and more over time (although I don't like it, and find it quite off-putting whenever I wore it). The dryness of cloves can also be imitated by other, softer spices that are less pungent: ginger, for example, which is used as a lovely dry-tobacco substitute in Creed's Millesime Tabarome. The whole 'dry tobacco' - or what I think some perfumers/houses calls 'tobacco leaf' - that can be found in scents like Aramis Havana or Remi Latour's Cigar are basically clever ways of adding tobacco-ish notes in to fairly standard masculine fougeres. Moreso than the above, they fail to fundamentally convey the aroma of tobacco, although they do capture something of the essence or 'feel' of it. Those fougeres spawned the herbal 'tobaccos', like Lutens' Chergui, and can also be used to convey something rustic, as is the case with Villoresi's Atman Xaman. Villoresi's tobacco also leans on the arabic trend as well; something most obviously achieved by Tom Ford's Tobacco Ouds (Byredo released their own version last year, Tobacco Mandarin or something ike that?), which is all ambers, spices, and oriental notes. In some ways, these do capture oriental tobaccos fairly well, and Villoresi's fascination with the east means he has created a sort of 'greatest hits' of both the designer and niche world of tobaccos in AX. I'm not sure it works as a wearable fragrance, first of all, and I'm also not sure if it really convey tobacco as much as it conveys 'tobacco-infused leather furniture with an arabic heart'. Probably the only one that bucks the trend in terms of the true aroma of tobacco is Arko's Smoke: it smells like cigarette smoke with a sweet yet subtle vanilla base. The fragrance is an achievement in form but not in function. Who really wants to smell like a cigarette, the worst of all tobaccos?!

My humble opinion is that - at this moment in time - there isn't a tobacco fragrance that is truly fit for purpose. Or, there isn't a fragrance that manages to capture both the essence of tobacco and something close to the multifaceted aroma that tobacco can have, in whatever form it comes. The essence is very well done in something like Sandor 70s - it feels lush, rich, decadent, adult, nocturnal, civilised, and aged. Other scents capture this, too - not least Michael by Kors and, indeed, Atman Xaman, in its own peculiar, nostalgic sort of way. Which is why I think your comparison between those two fragrances is entirely sensible. But the actual aroma of tobacco is too varied to capture, or at least bolster in a wearable, durable fragrance without dilluting the tobacco absolute. Tobacco is dark and dirty, yet also pleasing, intoxicating, fragrant. The gloopy-sugary-fruity tobacco fragrances may capture some of this essence but, even in something as good as Xerjoff's Naxos, which is an incredible, accomplished fragrance, it's not really, truly the 'full' smell of tobacco (I had several comments saying I smelled like I'd been smoking when I wore it, but also that it was very floral, something I hadn't picked up when smelling up close - which is a good reminder to ask other people what they smell as sillage can reveal the 'true' balance of the overtones that you don't pick up when smelling something on yourself). My frustration with the lack of a 'true' tobacco - which extends to other notes, like sandalwood - is why I settled on Kors and I take absolutely zero offence from your lukewarm analysis of it, nor do I feel any need to challenge you simply because I really quite like it.

I think you've also hit on one of the drawbacks of 'social' media re: scarcity and investment. My own conclusion is that social media - all of them, youtube, instagram etc - offers a virtual and distorted reality; the ideas and actions that take place on/within this virtual space are all slightly askance from how we actually experience, wear, and enjoy perfume. In short, people start creating opinions and beliefs for and because of the virtual space. There's something emergent about the way that people gravitate towards ranking/listing scents by category, or whatever, on youtube - something that arises from the technology and the way we engage with it. Yes, youtube videos and that sort of thing may be encouraged/directed by big brands (as well as small brands, like 'clone' companies), but this sort of mindset doesn't exist without social media. People aren't likely to categorise fragrances in this manner without virtual reality, as the culture of the online world isn't really grounded by fragrance: unlike other objects, fragrance cannot be at the heart of 'fragcomm'. It is linguistic and visual - at least until iSmell is invented! And it's this virtual unreality that also influences opinions, where - as you rightly point out - something like scarcity, exclusivity, price etc all takes on a greater importance than it otherwise would because these attributes exist in the conceptual rather than sensory world. The fragrance itself - whatever it may be - is sensory. Its price, brand, rarity, popularity: these are all conceptual. And if/when the conceptual is what someone invests in to decide what fragrance they like, then any negative concept (like someone expressing an alternative opinion) may become a problem. I mention this (time and time again!) as the essence of 'fragrance as fragrance' vs. 'fragrance as idea'. The former is what really matters. But if you've built up an opinion in the realm of ideas, then you can't go back to the sensory experince (or 'fragrance as fragrance') to re-appreciate (!) the fragrance. If you're getting enjoyment from a fragrance because of the conceptual associations you've forged to it - rather than enjoying the fragrance as a fragrance first and foremost, before fleshing this enjoyment out with greater understand over time - then the (perceived) problem is the negative opinion. Because an opinion is a challenge within the conceptual realm, so if a belief/opinion/'flex' has been built on/within the conceptual realm as well, you need other people to agree. Different opinions aren't just different opinions, they're challenges. In some circles it can even become dissent. Clone companies have very cleverly utilised and enticed people who are prone to this mindset, by convincing people they're getting, let's say, a Creed fragrance for 5% of the price - and anyone who disagrees this is an unwelcome challenger: a heretic of sorts. Aventus and Amouage types tend to suffer from the same affliction: you just have to step around them, knowing they're not going to engage honestly with the sensory experience. Step over.

All of this is why I do my best to keep banging on about how, for those who end up on wading in to fragrance enthusiasm, you should always put the sensory experience at the forefront of any decision making process. Losing sight of this - and getting lost in the digital unreality of communities and concepts - is a recipe for disaster. It also turns people away from discussion boards and makes the digital spaces poorer and less useful places as a result.

I may get round to listing and rating the tobacco scents I've tried...eventually! Although, I think part of the problem is that such a hierarchy is part of what I've described above: it's an artificial concept, a hierarchy that isn't really reflective of the sensory experience. The most accurate tobacco aroma I've tried is by no means the best fragrance. A two dimensional hierarchical list of tobacco fragrances seems fairly easy to compile but perhaps that's the problem: it's too easy to be dishonest about it. The tobacco scents I've tried feel more like a spectrum to me; most have value in their own sort of way. I'm not sure how to rank that numerically...
 

MegaMav

Well-known member
Dec 12, 2013
slpfrsly, thank you for your well thought out and thorough post!
I think you should try the Demeter if you can, it's really ripe.
Complete agree with your assessment on the state of tobaccos in the fragrance industry.
It took a lot of money spent to find that out, luckily I found some nice ones, but they all dont quite scratch the earthy, pungent itch of the smell of tobacco.
Another one I recommend trying is Fougere Bengale by Parfum d'Empire, neat stuff.

Who really wants to smell like a cigarette, the worst of all tobaccos?!

Recommend avoiding Rasasi's Tobacco Blaze then. Pure ash tray.
 

slpfrsly

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 1, 2019
slpfrsly, thank you for your well thought out and thorough post!
Another one I recommend trying is Fougere Bengale by Parfum d'Empire, neat stuff.

And thanks to you.

I'm a big fan of Fougere Bengale, although I have never actually given it a full wearing. I'll be honest, I get mostly cumin and oakmoss from it - a daring mix, something that does lean it ever so close to old man stale armpit territory, although not quite - but I'll look out for the tobacco when I come back round to trying it. I agree it's a good fragrance, I'm just not sure I could wear it with any regularity.
 

Andy the frenchy

Well-known member
Sep 16, 2018
I rub some the wrong way on here because I have no issue expressing my opinion even if it goes against the group-think grain.

There is no group think grain. There is no complot against anyone. There is no mob. There is no victim. It is just interesting to read your different perception of this scent compared to most of the people. And that might be possible, just not common. That doesn't make of you a bad guy or anything else, relax. That's all I mean be 'I'm scratching my head'.
I was just saying that there are different manners to express dislike. One can says this 's**ks' (or other degrading words aimed more at the people liking it than the fragrance itself) or also 'I do not appreciate/understand/don't care for it'. The first will generate conflict, the second will generate an intelligent discussion. Same same but different!
Now please let's bring back this thread on track, as it has taken a sour direction. (Please do not feed the sharks!)


To me, 1740 is an immortelle-and-leather scent both in its vintage and current formulation (I've owned both). I similarly find Atman Xaman to be an immortelle-and-leather scent. Tobacco is not at the center of either (and I get no tobacco in 1740 at all).

Both 1740 and AX have a slightly musty element. Ghislain has an affection for a sort of "old book" mustiness, and it runs throughout a lot of the HdP lineup. The musty component in 1740 feels a bit like a grand library, while Atman Xaman feels more "country house" to me (I think that comparison comes from Darvant).

1740 is dense and opulent, Atman Xaman is aromatic and relaxed. If I were to recommend a tobacco fragrance that echoes 1740's dense opulence, it would be Masque Montecristo, which has something of 1740's hedonism even if it's otherwise different.

Vintage Michael for Men strikes me as being a different animal than any of the above due to its emphasis on plum and sticky dried fruit that gives it its signature accord, and the salty-fir component that borders on feeling briny/marine. The urinous tobacco in the base of Michael strikes me as fairly unique, even in niche fragrances; the closest thing I've found to it is Remy Latour Cigar Commander. The suede in Michael for Men is the plush/luxe sort that one finds more vividly realized in some of the Bottega Veneta fragrances.

That is also my perception of these 3 fragrances, even if, like you said, the tobacco note in Michael is limited to the base (and imo not so strong compared to its fruity/boozy facet).
 

Andy the frenchy

Well-known member
Sep 16, 2018
I really enjoyed Atelier's Tobacco Nuit [...]

This is a very interesting one, supposedly giving an impression of tobacco flower, not tobacco leaf/pipe/cigar/cigarette. Not sure what tobacco flowers are supposed to smell, but I really enjoy this fragrance, and glad I have a 200ml bottle, since this one is now discontinued.
 
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Emanuel76

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2018
Yesterday I smelled Meo Fusciuni - Little Song on someone who took a shower in this perfume (oversprayed a lot).
I didn't realize it contained tobacco until I saw the olfactory pyramid. But I liked it a lot.
So, I have to buy a sample... which I'll add to the pile of samples that I will test only in the fall. :rolleyesold:
I hope I'll love it.

Top - Bergamot, Ginger, Pink pepper;
Heart - Turkish rose, Coffee extract, Liatrix*.
Base - Tobacco, Bourbon vetiver, Civet, Sage, Musk, Cistus labdanum.

*Liatrix - a sweet floral, sultry, honey note.

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Andy the frenchy

Well-known member
Sep 16, 2018
Yesterday I smelled Meo Fusciuni - Little Song on someone who took a shower in this perfume (oversprayed a lot).
I didn't realize it contained tobacco until I saw the olfactory pyramid.

The tobacco is indeed not prominent in that one, and it's no surprise since Meo Fusciuni uses real tobacco absolute (a quite 'soft' smell, paradoxally not resulting as realistic as tobacco accords made of spices).
To my nose, it is mostly rose, supported by a noticeable coffee note (possibly the most beautiful coffee note in a fragrance), and a hint of vetiver in the base.
 

Emanuel76

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2018
Meo Fusciuni - Little Song

So, I have to buy a sample... which I'll add to the pile of samples that I will test only in the fall. :rolleyesold:
I hope I'll love it.
It's an obscure brand. I didn't really think I'd find samples.
But, strangely, I found and bought a sample in the same day, from a small online store from here.

Top - Bergamot, Ginger, Pink pepper;
Heart - Turkish rose, Coffee extract, Liatrix*.
Base - Tobacco, Bourbon vetiver, Civet, Sage, Musk, Cistus labdanum.

*Liatrix - a sweet floral, sultry, honey note.

There was a few cold days, so I thought it worth testing it.
There is no point in testing perfumes on the heat. It's a waste of samples. With a few exceptions, perfumes that I like don't shine during the summer heat.


Top:
Very short leaved top notes - coffee, mild peppery, slightly camphorous-terpenic for a few minutes (more like juniper than bergamot + ginger), faint rose, almost no sweetness.
I also get some faint gasoline odor which I don't like.
It's pretty thick, not cologney. Not (very) refreshing, as you would have expected after seeing these notes - pink pepper, ginger, bergamot.

The coffee it's not pitch black, it doesn't have the pronounced earthy bitterness of the coffee extract, and it isn't rich, warm and savory as freshly ground coffee.
It's somehow leveled by the base notes into a semi-gourmand powdery-woody (mild talcum impression) coffee. Slightly roasted-smoky.

After 5 minutes the mix sweetens.

Heart:
- (the same) coffee accord;
- warm animalic musk (vintage Etro's type of musk - my favorite) - consistent, thick, woolly, not just light and fluffy, over time it becomes more and more present;
- shrivelled floral rose, slightly jammy from the labdanum+benzoin from the base.
Not very well shaped. At times I even wondered if the rose is just an illusion, something resulting from the other notes.
- cinnamon;
- liquid vanillic weedy-flowery honey.

Base:
Dominant warm animalic musk, labdanum, benzoin (spiced vanilla)(moderately sweet), tame woody vetiver in the background, peppery and slightly salty/metallic.
The influence of this base can be felt from the very beginning
The deep dry down is pleasant.

If I force myself, maybe I can find the tobacco both in the heart and in the base notes, maybe even in the deep dry down. But it's not very convincing.

Yesterday I smelled Meo Fusciuni - Little Song on someone who took a shower in this perfume (oversprayed a lot).
I didn't realize it contained tobacco until I saw the olfactory pyramid. But I liked it a lot.
Very different from how I felt it in the air. It seemed like something similar to vintage Versace - Versus Uomo.

7/10


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Emanuel76

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2018
Sammarco - Bond-T

On skin it's horrendous - a suffocating mix of rubbery leather (white rubber, not smoky-burnt rubber), stinky cheese and earthy bitterness for way too long.

On paper it's an outstanding boozy scent (opened empty cognac barrel type of booze), with flowery, fruity and tobaccoy facets.
Cocoa gives texture, osmanthus and castoreum gives depth, patchouli (earthy/woody) gives consistency.
Dark, thick, not very sweet.
I don't get the chocolate until the dry down, a velevety suede cocoa/chocolate.

The tobacco is not the main star, but is there.

I also recommended it for those who love osmanthus, which is very present and easily detectable.

Awesome!

PS
Strangely short lived on paper.
On my skin it's nuclear.


On paper: +9/10

On skin: 4/10. After the ordeal from the beginning it becomes pleasant. Not as pleasant as it is on paper, but it's getting closer. Unfortunately I can't get over the first hour.


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Emanuel76

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2018
BDK - Velvet Tonka

Tested on paper.

Soapy-detergent-woody almonds, with some ambery-vanilla sweetness.
Grainy, almost scratchy.
Nothing velvety here.

5/10

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Emanuel76

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2018
Lorenzo Villoresi - Atman Xaman EDT

I don't share the others enthusiasm for this one.
Vaguely similar to 1740 Marquis de Sade. It's more closer to Divine - L'Homme Sage - the same muddied feel (it's more accentuated here in A.X) from too many ingredients with (some) relatively close characteristics and the same benty passive-aggressive sweetness, which in the first instance seems mild, but little by little it becomes upsetting, it's like soaked with sweetness, the sweetness comes out through all its pores.
Somehow perfumey.

I don't like it at all.

6/10


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MegaMav

Well-known member
Dec 12, 2013
Lorenzo Villoresi - Atman Xaman EDT

I don't share the others enthusiasm for this one.
Vaguely similar to 1740 Marquis de Sade. It's more closer to Divine - L'Homme Sage - the same muddied feel (it's more accentuated here in A.X) from too many ingredients with (some) relatively close characteristics and the same benty passive-aggressive sweetness, which in the first instance seems mild, but little by little it becomes upsetting, it's like soaked with sweetness, the sweetness comes out through all its pores.
Somehow perfumey.

I don't like it at all.

6/10

Fair score. Fair assessment.
 

Andy the frenchy

Well-known member
Sep 16, 2018
Lorenzo Villoresi - Atman Xaman EDT

I don't share the others enthusiasm for this one.
Vaguely similar to 1740 Marquis de Sade. It's more closer to Divine - L'Homme Sage - the same muddied feel (it's more accentuated here in A.X) from too many ingredients with (some) relatively close characteristics and the same benty passive-aggressive sweetness, which in the first instance seems mild, but little by little it becomes upsetting, it's like soaked with sweetness, the sweetness comes out through all its pores.
Somehow perfumey.

I don't like it at all.

6/10

Sorry you don't like it. I have a different opinion, but I appreciate to hear yours, and respect it. It agree that it shares similarities with 1740.
A couple of extra wearing during colder times might help appreciate it more.


Fair score. Fair assessment.
Not sure what that means, since there's nothing fair or unfair in an opinion, and scoring is just about personal tastes.
When it comes to comparisons with other fragrances, well, it's a different story.
 

thrilledchilled

All Is Beautiful
Basenotes Plus
Nov 17, 2018
Lorenzo Villoresi - Atman Xaman EDT

I don't share the others enthusiasm for this one.
Vaguely similar to 1740 Marquis de Sade. It's more closer to Divine - L'Homme Sage - the same muddied feel (it's more accentuated here in A.X) from too many ingredients with (some) relatively close characteristics and the same benty passive-aggressive sweetness, which in the first instance seems mild, but little by little it becomes upsetting, it's like soaked with sweetness, the sweetness comes out through all its pores.
Somehow perfumey.

I don't like it at all.

6/10


7157amze2DL._AC_SX522_.jpg

Got it. Doesn’t remind me of 1740 though.
 

Andy the frenchy

Well-known member
Sep 16, 2018
Meo Fusciuni - Little Song
[...]
If I force myself, maybe I can find the tobacco both in the heart and in the base notes, maybe even in the deep dry down. But it's not very convincing.

Agreed. Fusciuni uses real tobacco absolute, hence why the result is not as realistic as the spice-based tobacco accord one can find in so many tobacco frags... the final result is more soft, straw-ish...
Anyways, to my nose, this is a coffee-centric fragrance, not tobacco centric. Just a like for me.
 

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