How Marketing Colors Our Perception

lair77

Super Member
Jun 7, 2022
This concept is true amongst many industries (fashion, technology, food/nutrition, etc). A small percentage of people have a deep knowledge on how the products are made, but most people's primary source of education is marketing.

Reasons why marketing information moves father than scientific information:
  • People are paid to do this. Someone who is paying money for ads or to appear higher in a search engine is going to get their point across faster than someone who is just blogging out of a labor of love.
  • Marketing is designed to appeal to common people. It's easy to understand, and often articulated in a way that's sexy or aesthetically pleasing. Whereas understanding a topic from a scientific point of view requires a lot of patience.
Many people get their information from other people. Whether it's friends, youtubers, people in the fragrance community, online articles etc. Out of the last 50 people you've received information from, how many of them have a deep knowledge of the industry and how the products are made? Maybe a few of them. But it's likely that most of them are just going by what they've heard from marketing; or from other people who have heard from marketing.

The average person goes in innocent with no expectation. Fragrance enthusiasts go into fragrance with expectations. The brand name, company history, company reputation, bottle aesthetics, price, hype and opinions of peers can all be factors either way. When comparing 2 fragrances, I try my best to envision them in a completely empty bottle, with clear liquid, no name, no packaging, no company, and no price.

We tend to associate feelings, places and ideas with fragrances. These traits are not intrinsic to a fragrance. Part of this is marketing. Many reviews say Creed Millesime Imperial is liquid gold; could it be a coincidence that the company made the bottle gold and claims it was made for a king? Of course people are going to feel this way; it's what they were suggested they should feel. But at the same time, if fragrance is an art, it can have those meanings to people. A painting is more than an array of colors. A video game is more than polygons colliding into each other. These interpretations aren't necessarily right or wrong, but they can be influenced by other people.

I don't consider myself highly knowledgeable on fragrances either. I'm just a regular consumer who has tried lots of scents.

And we don't need to be perfect. Not everyone has to be an expert. If you're happy consuming fragrances, it's perfectly okay to not be super-knowledgeable about a product. It's okay to have blind spots; but it's good to be aware that we have them.
 
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ScentSensei

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Aug 21, 2020
This is a very deep topic. I'm very uncomfortable with marketing being considered informational or educational. The word 'marketing' itself in many cases simply casts the concept of 'grooming' peoples thoughts and expectations in a less negative light. As a citizen in the United States I feel like our country is marketed to us as #1 all the time even though statistically and realistically we are so far behind other countries in everything from education, health care, worker benefits, vacation/family leave, wages, and overall quality of life satisfaction. Marketing can imply empty status and success rather than bestow it or confirm it.
 

Cook.bot

Flâneuse
Basenotes Plus
Jan 6, 2012
This concept is true amongst many industries (fashion, technology, food/nutrition, etc). A small percentage of people have a deep knowledge on how the products are made, but most people's primary source of education is marketing. [....] And we don't need to be perfect. It's fine to not be super-knowledgeable about a product. Not everyone has to be an expert. If you're happy consuming fragrances, perfectly okay to not be super-knowledgeable about a product. It's okay to have blind spots; but it's good to be aware that we have them.

And your point was.... ?
 

Dothraki

Basenotes Dependent
Jul 20, 2013
Haha yes. Marketing has gotten so bad that when I see a commercial ad on TV (whether for a product, service or political) I feel like they are insulting our intelligence…as if marketing to a group of dummies, or children.

A lot of the products you buy can be had for 10% of the price. For instance an Adidas hoodie, might pay $80 for one…when the same hoodie from the same conveyor belt made from the same material in the same factory gets sold for $15 in the budget store across the street, just without the letters ADIDAS printed on it. Grab it out of season and pay $8.00 from the clearance bin. Now you got an adidas hoodie for 10% of the price and they are still making big profit off it.

I think the marketing works for those that are seeking what the marketing offers… an image. Pre-packaged psychological feelings and image wrapped up into a nice big price tag. It’s so fake, such a mind game preying on vulnerabilities of the general population.

As for fragrances…I find their marketing quite amusing (Jean Paul Gualtier especially) but would never buy something based on it. Like Tucan Sam says “Just follow your nose!” Lol. Don’t get me started on cereal marketed as something you give your kids to eat first thing in the morning. Here…eat this sugar and go to school.
 

hednic

Basenotes Institution
Oct 25, 2007
And we don't need to be perfect. It's fine to not be super-knowledgeable about a product. Not everyone has to be an expert. If you're happy consuming fragrances, perfectly okay to not be super-knowledgeable about a product. It's okay to have blind spots; but it's good to be aware that we have them.
Agree with this sentiment.
 

Ken_Russell

Basenotes Institution
Jan 21, 2006
Thank you for the highly insightful topic and post.
Often considering that Basenotes and its community but also its additional resources and posters contribution is luckily blessed with a richness of knowledge and passionate opinions about fragrances way beyond just marketing.
 

imm0rtelle

Basenotes Junkie
Apr 2, 2021
Many people get their information from other people. Whether it's friends, youtubers, people in the fragrance community, online articles etc. Out of the last 50 people you've received information from, how many of them have a deep knowledge of the industry and how the products are made? Maybe a few of them. But it's likely that most of them are just going by what they've heard from marketing; or from other people who have heard from marketing.
This is 100% the case with Juliette Has a Gun's Not a Perfume. The brand literally markets it as only containing Cetalox.
A fragrance made out of a single element called Cetalox. Usually used in perfumery as a base note, it plays here the lead role... Another advantage of this particular composition, is that it is entirely allergen free. The result is minimalist, elegant, pure.
People read this, and then parrot this as fact. Little did they now, they've been lied to. Not a Perfume contains more than just Cetalox. Through a GC-MS analysis, only about 7.5% Cetalox is in the original. There’s also Hedione, Iso E Super, Bois Ambrene Forte, Habanolide, Ambrettolide, Musc Ketone, and Ethylene Brassylate. Large doses of Iso E Super and Ethylene Brassylate.
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Source:
We tend to associate feelings, places and ideas with fragrances. These traits are not intrinsic to a fragrance.
I think fragrance should be interpretive, rather than literal. The perfumer is trying to create ideas using aromachemicals that have absolutely nothing to do with those ideas, after all. Perfumers are trying to create something more than the sum of its parts. Analyzing the fragrance as just its constituents misses the point.
 

Diamondflame

(Almost) Off the Grid
Basenotes Plus
Jun 28, 2009
What we (are led to) believe we tend to perceive.” While I’m usually aware when I’m being sold I quite enjoy the ‘romance’ and like to remain open to potentially delightful experiences from thoughtful and persuasively executed piece of marketing. Life gets boring otherwise. Who looks at paintings only to see which pigments have been used??
 

Paddington

Marmalade Sandwich Eater
Basenotes Plus
Jun 17, 2021
The mental hooks they use to grab people tales of grandeur and inspiration from trips that never happened to give the illusion of something greater, people love to be lied to they love the story's but why? some people cant handle not being told what to think this makes all these marketing tactics so powerful.

A common one a fragrance with no notes given a million different thoughts was to what they smell, some will give what they think they smell others will latch on to what someone else has said, some cannot handle being made to think what they perceive and demand instructions on what they are smelling.

I feel there are two groups when it comes to this those that are aware of it and go with it and those still lulled by sweet lies

also these company have literal psychiatrist to aid them in these endeavours

sorry if I came off ranty just wanted to give my thoughts and there all over the place
 

Cook.bot

Flâneuse
Basenotes Plus
Jan 6, 2012
Analyzing the fragrance as just its constituents misses the point.

Bingo.

Not a Perfume contains more than just Cetalox. Through a GC-MS analysis, only about 7.5% Cetalox is in the original.

I hope someone has stepped up and sued their asses for misrepresentation, or fraud, or whatever's appropriate.
 

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