Guerlain L'Homme Ideal...pathetic generic trash.

david

Well-known member
Jun 7, 2005
Maybe I didn't search properly ?...
I found one thread about this, dated April. It's been released here in France.
On fragrantica there are already many reviews of this.
The reviews speak for themselves.....
"Tragic" !!! What is going on with these major designer houses, producing such low quality, unimaginative generic fragrances ? I am so unimpressed by them all. They all smell the same - operative words are boring, bland. Is this the effect of globalisation ? Seems so.
The major houses seem to be copying each other rather than being inventive. Whatever happened to that word "dynamic" ??
Reviewers on fragrantica compare this to " Valentino Uomo/ Axe Instinct/ YSL La Nuit....."

I can only say, hat's off to Dior, who seem to have more initiative than all of the others put together.
 
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Buysblind

Well-known member
Jan 21, 2011
Relax, david. I couldn't tell from your post whether you had actually smelled it or not. That's why I asked.
 

adam090273

Well-known member
Jul 27, 2013
I was really looking forward to this release, as were / are many others. I have not smelled this to date and I will also reserve my judgement until I have a chance to smell it, but it doesn't look good.
Thanks for your view on this one David.
 

mr. reasonable

Well-known member
Jan 1, 2009
It's a mainstream release - I hope it does really well for them so TW can kick back and fire off a few more Songe d'un Bois d'Ete's for those of us who are interested.

When you look at what passes for 'masculine' these days anything that does not have 'pink pepper' up front, 'cedar and woods notes' in the middle and 'masculine vanilla cupcake' in the base . . . is basically an anomaly. Well, unless it's supa-fresh, of course, which seems to be the other accepted approach for the bros.

Nevertheless, look forward to trying it.
 

saminlondon

Well-known member
Aug 25, 2011
I'm very disappointed with L'Homme Idéal. We wait years for the new men's fragrance from Guerlain, and all we get is a syrupy mess that most will struggle to distinguish from the other mainstreams masculines on offer. Where's the creativity, the innovation? It would have been great to see a dry, modern masculine chypre, a new take on the aromatic fougère - anything that would have stood out a little from the crowd.

In other areas - his careful restoration of the classic Guerlain heritage, for instance - Wasser has been a real boon, but his own compositions rarely sparkle. A real shame.
 
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pluran

Well-known member
Mar 2, 2006
It's a mainstream release - I hope it does really well for them so TW can kick back and fire off a few more Songe d'un Bois d'Ete's for those of us who are interested.

When you look at what passes for 'masculine' these days anything that does not have 'pink pepper' up front, 'cedar and woods notes' in the middle and 'masculine vanilla cupcake' in the base . . . is basically an anomaly. Well, unless it's supa-fresh, of course, which seems to be the other accepted approach for the bros.

Nevertheless, look forward to trying it.

Sums it up good. Haven't smelled it but hard to expect much when they have to compete with disinfectants like Bleu de Chanel or many of the various masculine syrups. But somehow I think it's probably a good fragrance. There's a reason why Guerlain is still considered the greatest perfume house. Hell, even the much maligned Guerlain Homme is a lot better overall composition than most of what's out there.

Yeah, variations of Songe d'un Bois d'Ete would be hugely appreciated. One of the best things I've ever smelled. Hopefully Wasser will have the freedom to do some more of that.
 
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Bigsly

Well-known member
Feb 20, 2008
I'm very disappointed with L'Homme Idéal. We wait years for the new men's fragrance from Guerlain, and all we get is a syrupy mess that most will struggle to distinguish from the other mainstreams masculines on offer. Where's the creativity, the innovation? It would have been great to see a dry, modern masculine chypre, a new take on the aromatic fougère - anything that would have stood out a little from the crowd.

In other areas - his careful restoration of the classic Guerlain heritage, for instance - Wasser has been a real boon, but his own compositions rarely sparkle. A real shame.

I don't know why so many BNers have such confidence in these companies any longer! Fortunately, and unlike most things in life, you can "relive the glory days" by simply buying vintage bottles. Why hope for a Derby-like scent when you can just buy a bottle of Derby?
 

noggs

Well-known member
Jan 20, 2007
It will probably fare on Basenotes like a number of other frags released over the past few years: outright dismissal at first followed by a more objective reapppraisal several years later when it will receive greater appreciation.

I don't have a problem with these sorts of fragrances, especially if, as mr. reasonable mentions, it allows a company the financial wiggle room to create more daring or innovative fragrances for the connoisseurs.

EDIT: Letting the following paragraph stand as I wrote it. It is, however, incorrect, as pointed out by several members in their posts below. L'Homme and the various Hommes are not related. Sorry for any confusion.

I don't quite understand the disappointment specifically directed towards a flanker of Guerlain L'Homme. The original and its earlier flankers were all mass market fragrances made in a style that appeals to that market. What L'Homme Ideale turned out to be shouldn't have been a big surprise.
 
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Mattybumpkin

Well-known member
May 27, 2007
I think many are too quick to pass judgement, as well as base their judgement and their expectations of a fragrance on the "history" of a house, like Guerlain. I too fall into this category, and did this with Bleu de Chanel, for example.

I think more time needs to be spent with a fragrance, like a week of normal wear, instead of smelling it once on the skin and/or test strip.
 

pluran

Well-known member
Mar 2, 2006
It will probably fare on Basenotes like a number of other frags released over the past few years: outright dismissal at first followed by a more objective reapppraisal several years later when it will receive greater appreciation.....

Great perceptions as usual, noggs. Build 'em up then tear 'em down and vice versa. Been that way for a long time. Hell, I don't think I've smelled anything by Guerlain that was all that bad. There's a reason why it's still considered the greatest perfume house and why every great perfumer wants to work for them.
 

saminlondon

Well-known member
Aug 25, 2011
It will probably fare on Basenotes like a number of other frags released over the past few years: outright dismissal at first followed by a more objective reapppraisal several years later when it will receive greater appreciation.

I don't have a problem with these sorts of fragrances, especially if, as mr. reasonable mentions, it allows a company the financial wiggle room to create more daring or innovative fragrances for the connoisseurs.

I don't quite understand the disappointment specifically directed towards a flanker of Guerlain L'Homme. The original and its earlier flankers were all mass market fragrances made in a style that appeals to that market. What L'Homme Ideale turned out to be shouldn't have been a big surprise.

Absolutely agree that time out to reflect and consider is necessary, but as far as this one is concerned I have a sample, don't like it and at the moment don't feel like going anywhere near it! Maybe I'll come round eventually, who knows.

Of course I've no problem if Guerlain's commercial releases facilitate the creation of more innovative fragrances - but where are they? The succession of Petite Robe Noire and Shalimar flankers (Parfum Initial is dead, long live Soufflé de Shalimar) certainly don't fit into that category. And longstanding, distinctive, historically significant scents like Véga and Sous le Vent have got the chop. I suppose it's the whiff of cynicism that gets me.

By the way, I don't think L'Homme Idéal is supposed to be a flanker of L'Homme, is it? I had the impression it was a standalone release.
 

Buysblind

Well-known member
Jan 21, 2011
Absolutely agree that time out to reflect and consider is necessary, but as far as this one is concerned I have a sample, don't like it and at the moment don't feel like going anywhere near it! Maybe I'll come round eventually, who knows.

Of course I've no problem if Guerlain's commercial releases facilitate the creation of more innovative fragrances - but where are they? The succession of Petite Robe Noire and Shalimar flankers (Parfum Initial is dead, long live Soufflé de Shalimar) certainly don't fit into that category. And longstanding, distinctive, historically significant scents like Véga and Sous le Vent have got the chop. I suppose it's the whiff of cynicism that gets me.

By the way, I don't think L'Homme Idéal is supposed to be a flanker of L'Homme, is it? I had the impression it was a standalone release.


No it's not. The other fragrance (and it's flankers) isn't named Guerlain L'Homme either. It's Guerlain Homme (L'Eau, L'Eau Boisee, and Intense). Pointing this out only because it helps clarify that these are two completely separate releases--Guerlain L'Homme Ideal and Guerlain Homme.
 

david

Well-known member
Jun 7, 2005
Thanks to everyone for your views.
Believe me I am not bashing Guerlain, or this fragrance - for the sake of it. It is my personal opinion on this one and I don't think it will change in five years time, or in ten years time.
This one's not for me and I'm personally sick and tired of this trend of low quality, synthetic,crowd pleaser/ proletarian fragrances.
I cannot understand the, "if you haven't got anything good to say about a fragrance..then don't say anything" attitude here sometimes...?
Perhaps for some, my comments are seen as attacking a Holy Grail....
I really admire Dior for producing cutting edge stuff. They took risks with Dior Homme and it paid off bigtime. I think this is currently the best selling male fragrance in France. They also produced many other daring,ingenious perfumes in recent years, including Eau Sauvage Parfum.
I praise Dior for their creativity and use of high quality ingredients.
 

david

Well-known member
Jun 7, 2005
I don't know why so many BNers have such confidence in these companies any longer! Fortunately, and unlike most things in life, you can "relive the glory days" by simply buying vintage bottles. Why hope for a Derby-like scent when you can just buy a bottle of Derby?

Totally agree with this. I also agree very much with the comments of saminlondon.
 

JiveHippo

Well-known member
Jul 6, 2011
Ouch. I was going to blind buy this as soon as it's avaliable here, but I think I'll have to try it first. Nothing but negative reviews so far.
 

Uvalde

Well-known member
Apr 26, 2013
It will probably fare on Basenotes like a number of other frags released over the past few years: outright dismissal at first followed by a more objective reapppraisal several years later when it will receive greater appreciation.

Heh, I was going to say the same thing, except phrase it more snarkily, like, "you pack of eggheads is not to be trusted, given your horrific history with Bleu de Chanel". (obviously just teasing... very much appreciate the sophisticated tastes here). But the fact is, even really great compositions like BdC don't fare well on BN if they're too accessible. Duly noted, though, this is a more mass market, accessible fragrance.
 

noggs

Well-known member
Jan 20, 2007
By the way, I don't think L'Homme Idéal is supposed to be a flanker of L'Homme, is it? I had the impression it was a standalone release.

Oops, I think you are right.

I wasn't paying enough attention to the distinction between Homme and L'Homme (bloody French!). Should've done my homework before spouting off. Guerlain's promotion of this treats it as a separate fragrance.

Thanks for setting this straight.
 

onethinline

Well-known member
Dec 1, 2011
With notable exceptions, fragrance houses have always played to the broad tastes of the time; what's really at issue here is that the taste of many connoisseurs such as us Basenoters is out-of-step with what's currently in fashion. As much as I'd admire Guerlain releasing a masculine chypre, there's no way it would sell; most guys smelling a chypre today will associate the accord with datedness, with a grandparent perhaps, but certainly not with something they want to smell like. When chypres were popular, they were, well, POPULAR, and the connotation of the scent was new, now, desirable. We enthusiasts go back and appreciate it, but it's something now out-of-time.

The more realistic thing to look for, as far as broadly-targeted releases, is a composition which plays off current fashions while saying something new and distinguished within that vocabulary. Dior Homme comes to mind right away: it's both daring, in that it turns on a (synthetic) iris note in a men's fragrance, but it also sits on a sweet-cacao-suede-wood base which is happily legible to men with a taste for current gourmands, vanilla, etc.

For something to step forward as both different and broadly appealing, it has to hit the right next step at the right time. I have no idea of the formula there, if there is one, but I'd suspect it has to feel to audiences as a step forward (when calone was novel, say), rather than a step back (chypre today).

I mentioned this in another thread, but it's interesting to consider that Chanel Pour Monsieur, which most of us regard highly, was released at a time when chypres were part of the lingua franca of fragrances -- that was just a normal way a fragrance would smell. Chanel offered a readily legible, go-for-it-and-feel-right men's composition, something familiar but made with care and intelligence. Now we like it because it's out-of-step. But how is Bleu de Chanel today so different from what Pour Monsieur was then? BdC is based on what is currently a familiar motif, something currently associated with cleanliness and grooming, and composed to be easy-to-reach-for, recognizable, popular, but created with care and intelligence. Many of us don't care for it because it is in-step with popular taste. Many of us who have spent more time with it have discovered it to be far less careless and cynical than it first appears, though none would claim it offers anything daring or different -- as Pour Monsieur did not in its time, either.
 

gtsb

Well-known member
Jan 15, 2011
With notable exceptions, fragrance houses have always played to the broad tastes of the time; what's really at issue here is that the taste of many connoisseurs such as us Basenoters is out-of-step with what's currently in fashion. As much as I'd admire Guerlain releasing a masculine chypre, there's no way it would sell; most guys smelling a chypre today will associate the accord with datedness, with a grandparent perhaps, but certainly not with something they want to smell like. When chypres were popular, they were, well, POPULAR, and the connotation of the scent was new, now, desirable. We enthusiasts go back and appreciate it, but it's something now out-of-time.

The more realistic thing to look for, as far as broadly-targeted releases, is a composition which plays off current fashions while saying something new and distinguished within that vocabulary. Dior Homme comes to mind right away: it's both daring, in that it turns on a (synthetic) iris note in a men's fragrance, but it also sits on a sweet-cacao-suede-wood base which is happily legible to men with a taste for current gourmands, vanilla, etc.

For something to step forward as both different and broadly appealing, it has to hit the right next step at the right time. I have no idea of the formula there, if there is one, but I'd suspect it has to feel to audiences as a step forward (when calone was novel, say), rather than a step back (chypre today).

I mentioned this in another thread, but it's interesting to consider that Chanel Pour Monsieur, which most of us regard highly, was released at a time when chypres were part of the lingua franca of fragrances -- that was just a normal way a fragrance would smell. Chanel offered a readily legible, go-for-it-and-feel-right men's composition, something familiar but made with care and intelligence. Now we like it because it's out-of-step. But how is Bleu de Chanel today so different from what Pour Monsieur was then? BdC is based on what is currently a familiar motif, something currently associated with cleanliness and grooming, and composed to be easy-to-reach-for, recognizable, popular, but created with care and intelligence. Many of us don't care for it because it is in-step with popular taste. Many of us who have spent more time with it have discovered it to be far less careless and cynical than it first appears, though none would claim it offers anything daring or different -- as Pour Monsieur did not in its time, either.

This is a great post. Although I would be interested to hear how many people of fashion / perfume connoiseurs found those "popular" scents also classy and well done... here it seems like people (whose noses I trust) claim that this scent is simply shoddy and badly composed, regardless of the popularity of the scent. I have no idea since I haven't tried it, but I'm looking forward to trying it for myself.

I think Dior has been doing it right. They can put out a scent and call it "Aqua Fahrenheit" and it is still more original and striking than many other things out there on the market. And then they throw perfume connoisseurs a bone with their privée line.
 

saminlondon

Well-known member
Aug 25, 2011
I would be interested to hear how many people of fashion / perfume connoiseurs found those "popular" scents also classy and well done... here it seems like people (whose noses I trust) claim that this scent is simply shoddy and badly composed, regardless of the popularity of the scent. I have no idea since I haven't tried it, but I'm looking forward to trying it for myself.

I think Dior has been doing it right. They can put out a scent and call it "Aqua Fahrenheit" and it is still more original and striking than many other things out there on the market. And then they throw perfume connoisseurs a bone with their privée line.

Just for the record, I don't think it's shoddy or badly done: I just see it as absolutely generic, like David. Am so fed up with sweetish, gourmandy smells, hence my (probably unreastlic) hope for something dry, modern and innovative (i.e. not a powerhouse/vintage rehash).

Comments about Dior are spot on. Dior Homme was daring, and it paid off. Why can't Guerlain take a similar risk? Like Guerlain, Dior is part of LMVH, so it's not (presumably) a money issue.
 

Beau Garçon

Well-known member
Sep 16, 2007
I'm sad to say that I agree with all the negative reviews. "L'homme idéal" is completely banal and uninspired. It's just a masculine gourmand, woody, pungent fragrance that borrows some accords from dozens of popular men perfumes available in the market.


This promoting video featuring Thierry Wasser is pretty ridiculous... Mr. Wasser sounds and acts like a puppet from the marketing department: "The ideal fragrance exists... it's coming... are you ready?".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWRsMZfwpHw
 

G.303

Well-known member
Apr 21, 2003
This is truly sad... Everything is blending together... It all smells the same... Wow!!! I did not see this coming!!! How long will it take to see L'Homme Ideal Intense released?
 

joey86

Well-known member
Aug 17, 2009
Absolutely agree that time out to reflect and consider is necessary, but as far as this one is concerned I have a sample, don't like it and at the moment don't feel like going anywhere near it! Maybe I'll come round eventually, who knows.

Of course I've no problem if Guerlain's commercial releases facilitate the creation of more innovative fragrances - but where are they? The succession of Petite Robe Noire and Shalimar flankers (Parfum Initial is dead, long live Soufflé de Shalimar) certainly don't fit into that category. And longstanding, distinctive, historically significant scents like Véga and Sous le Vent have got the chop. I suppose it's the whiff of cynicism that gets me.

By the way, I don't think L'Homme Idéal is supposed to be a flanker of L'Homme, is it? I had the impression it was a standalone release.

What intrigues me the most is that they limit the distribution of the fragrance, then say that it got axed due to limited sales. i mean logic dictates if you limit the distribution of something, you will get less people buying it. And dont even get me started on the prohibitive pricing.
 

Torvo

Well-known member
Nov 14, 2007
I'm sad to say that I agree with all the negative reviewss of popu

This promoting video featuring Thierry Wasser is pretty ridiculous... Mr. Wasser sounds and acts like a puppet from the marketing department: "The ideal fragrance exists... it's coming... are you ready?".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWRsMZfwpHw

The video is utterly ridiculous:
"I created this fragrance to trigger your full potential ".
"this fragrance is designed for the man who catch the eye of every woman"

The seduction's guru...

And the comercial with Jon Kortajarena at the end reminds a lot to Kokorico's comercial

Well... Let's waitk for the reformulation
 

Beau Garçon

Well-known member
Sep 16, 2007
I was wearing it this week and I think that, despite the generic notes of testosterone (that cheap woody deodorant note), the note of bitter almond is quite nice. I think that a future, improved "eau de parfum" version with more emphasis on the amaretto and leather notes (too light in the current version) would be extremely interesting.
 

SmellyFinger

Well-known member
May 21, 2014
I have no idea if its good or bad, but I can respect what they are doing. Its pretty clear there is a lot of thought and vision behind this frag by TW. And they did a good job in the brief commercial of explaining it. If you want to take issue with the scent, performance, price etc its all fair game. But for people to claim that it is generic or uninspired is vapid criticism. Its that same old trite thing to do when you can't articulate a legit reason. I'm looking forward to sampling it. If it sux, it sux but give it a chance.
 

david

Well-known member
Jun 7, 2005
I have no idea if its good or bad, but I can respect what they are doing. Its pretty clear there is a lot of thought and vision behind this frag by TW. And they did a good job in the brief commercial of explaining it. If you want to take issue with the scent, performance, price etc its all fair game. But for people to claim that it is generic or uninspired is vapid criticism. Its that same old trite thing to do when you can't articulate a legit reason. I'm looking forward to sampling it. If it sux, it sux but give it a chance.

I was simply giving my personal views about this fragrance, (which seems to relate closely to most other peoples views) - both here and on fragrantica. Why are you so on the offensive? If you read my post I articulated more than one legit reason as to why I don't like the fragrance. All this "have a nice day" positiveness is so superficial, phoney...and really sux.
 

SmellyFinger

Well-known member
May 21, 2014
I was simply giving my personal views about this fragrance, (which seems to relate closely to most other peoples views) - both here and on fragrantica. Why are you so on the offensive? If you read my post I articulated more than one legit reason as to why I don't like the fragrance. All this "have a nice day" positiveness is so superficial, phoney...and really sux.

1- I never said you couldn't give your opinion. But perhaps some details? What didn't work for you and why? I am tired of "generic" criticisms that accuse everything of being "generic". Its a bit trite.

2- So when I give my OPINION about your OPINION, I'm being offensive? Seriously?

3- I agree about the have a nice day BS. If you want to slam them go ahead. I just wanted some clear criticism. How do it perform? Longevity? Projection? Look, I get it. A lot of stuff has been done to death. But a well executed and good performing fragrance is still worthy. And does not equate to "pathetic generic trash". The amaretto seemed unique as did the thought behind it. We will agree to disagree...
 
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