Green, clean(ish), sort-of-mean, dry and not overly sweet, work-appropriate masculine fragrance suggestions.

Red Hawk

Well-known member
Dec 4, 2019
My favorite green fragrances in my collection are Commodity Bergamot and Banana Republic 78 Vintage Green. They're both unisex though, both citrusy, so they may not quite have what you're looking for. Vintage Green has a sweetness to it, though Commodity Bergamot is drier and a bit more mossy I'd say.
 
Aug 2, 2005
To cut a long story short, I thought Beau de Jour was basically an ideal 'green' fragrance that I could use as a daily and work scent, however - whether it be due to post-covid nose changes, or simply a greater appreciation of a fragrance that develops through regular wearing - I find that I'm tired of the sweetness that crops up in the base. Particularly as it correlates with the midday and afternoon, when I find I want something less...gloopy. As such, I'm reluctantly seeking the possibility of replacing it with something else. In that vein, I'd very much appreciate if you could provide me with some suggestions.

I'm an open book in terms of suggestions but, frustratingly, I am quite picky about what I deem acceptable, let alone good. The general parameters would be something green, as I have other 'colours' covered in my wardrobe (citruses are yellow and white, for example; an 'aquatic' like Oud Minerale is simply shades of grey/black/silver). Quite how that greenery smells, I'm open-minded. If it is green+ something else, this would be fine, however I would quite like to start by investigating fougeres before I go straying too far from BdJ. Herbs are good - I am also very open to a lovely crisp, dry lavender scent - but so would be something mildly oakmossy (no dank old man smells though, please, nor anything too pungent).

I am currently looking and/or have samples on the way of the following:

Villoresi Wild Lavender
Diptyque Eau de Minthe
Chanel Egoiste Platinum
Heeley Athenean

As I say, I'm open to ideas, anything from Green Irish Tweed type aroma (which, to me, is like clean shower gel musks, iris, and then some green notes), to something that is more classical, perhaps retro, with a solid, masculine, deep-yet-clean oakmoss base. I've tried a few modern oakmosses, in the likes of Atelier's Bergamot scent, yet I haven't found a happy medium between that sort of light/crisp/dry and almost feminine airiness, and then the rugged, dank, leathery oakmoss of Gucci Nobile and other vintage fragrances. I had Dior's Eau for Men pencilled in as a potential replacement for BdJ if I ever tired of it, eventhough it's not really to my taste as it's more of a 'purple floral' scent, which tend to be overtly feminine in my opinion. It also dries down to a woody amber base, so would require an extensive re-sampling period, which I will probably try to do if I can find a bottle for a reasonable price (its discontinuation is another factor that means I'm not going straight for it).

The only other request would be to avoid sweet notes, as this is the main issue with Beau de Jour. As another example, I've also gone off Aventus since having covid as well, as the sweetness of that really dominates and makes me feel slightly nauseous at certain times. So, something a little drier, and not sweet, would be good - but I know people will interpret that in different ways, so don't try to avoid sweetness in its entirety. It's not like I'm looking for a stone-cold fragrance, just one that ideally doesn't dry down in to vanillic-amber.

The meanness is sort of tongue-in-cheek and mainly for rhetorical reasons. However, I do quite like the idea of something that evokes timeless masculinity - rather than meanness.

I've tried a shed load of scents, from Rive Gauche to Rogue Perfumery's retro fragrances. I'm open-minded about niche/designer but tend to find more satisfaction in the slightly less-than-mainstream designer market, or the established and not-extortionate niche. My most recent 'trials' were with Bois du Portgual and Viking, neither of which quite cut it.
Odin 02 Owari, Commes des Garçons Wondergreen
 

LiveJazz

Funky fresh
Basenotes Plus
Mar 16, 2006
R de Cappucci
Paco Rabanne pour Homme

Great suggestions, especially the Capucci. Brisk, dry, green, mossy chypre. Always remains stout.

And Paco Rabanne already remains soapy and fairly rugged on me. To FWV's point, there's honey, but it's a really light seasoning, more sharp than sweet in this context.

I wonder if some other older green feminine chypres might fit the bill, if many fougeres tend to dry into a bit too sweet of a mode? Perhaps Givenchy III, or Chanel Cristalle, or Sisley Eau de Campagne?
 
Last edited:
Mar 17, 2017
The OP mentioned "something that is more classical, perhaps retro, with a solid, masculine, deep-yet-clean oakmoss base," which immediately brought to mind French Affair by Ex Nihilo. It's a modern chypre and smells fairly sophisticated and serious to me. Don't let the word "chypre" turn you off. Although typically associated with women's fragrances, this "chypre" has enough "meanness" to make it unisex. It's not a pretty, frilly perfume.

Somebody else already mentioned Chanel Paris-Edimbourg for a spicy juniper green scent. I've sampled this one a number of times and agree that it's a spicy, green, woody, juniper scent. However, I could never get past the slight medicinal note that a lot of people pick up on. It's OK at first, but then the medicinal note seems to become more prominent in the dry down. I hate to say it, but I find that note reminiscent of Bengay, a liniment for sore muscles and joints sold in the US.

Tom Ford Vert des Bois, which was also mentioned previously, is a fragrance I'm personally familiar with. It's definitely a green woody fragrance that may fit the bill, but beware, it's not light and airy well into the dry down, and there's something about it that you may not necessarily consider sweet but rather goopy. I think if the top notes lasted longer, to keep it more airy and transparent, I'd probably wear it more often.

Speaking of Tom Ford, you may want to try Tom Ford Fougere Platine. It's greenish, not sweet or goopy (IMO), and has a retro feel but with a modern twist—more modern than, say, the well-constructed stuff from Rogue Perfumery.

I would also suggest you sample Atelier Cologne Emeraude Agar. I don't recall seeing it mentioned above. It's one of those oud (agarwood) fragrances that doesn't really feature a noticeable oud note, synthetic or otherwise. Rather, it's a moderately spicy, aromatic, green, woody fragrance with just a pinch of sweetness to keep it from turning acerbic. It's got an airy, transparent feel in keeping with the traditional cologne style, but it's not a cologne per se, and it does carry a certain gravitas.

Also mentioned previously, Frederic Malle French Lover may be what you're looking for. It's dry, peppery, green, aromatic, and woody. I've worn both the original French Lover (when it was called Bois d'Orage) as well as the current version that got reformulated when Estée Lauder acquired Editions de Parfums Frédéric Malle. Despite all the negative hype about reformulations, I can say that the reformulated French Lover is very close to the original and IMO better. In fact, many people probably would not notice any difference at all. I actually find the newer version more wearable, as there was an undefinable, prickly, penetrating note in the original version that wore on me, so that after a while I would always end up washing it off. That prickly note, I'm glad to say, has been either toned down or replaced by something that serves the same purpose but without being so irritating.

Lastly, regarding L'Homme Rochas (released in 2020), I have that one too. I agree with the barbershop assessment mentioned elsewhere but must warn you that if the sweetness in Beau De Jour is too much, this one may definitely be out. I do like L'Homme Rochas but don't wear it often. The sweetness is that ambery tonka bean type that shows up most often in lower budget fragrances. That's not to say it's bad—do check it out. But I just don't care for that specific kind of sweetness. The quality of the materials in L'Homme Rochas is not in the same league as Tom Ford and a lot of other brands mentioned in this post.
 
Jul 25, 2010
To cut a long story short, I thought Beau de Jour was basically an ideal 'green' fragrance that I could use as a daily and work scent, however - whether it be due to post-covid nose changes, or simply a greater appreciation of a fragrance that develops through regular wearing - I find that I'm tired of the sweetness that crops up in the base. Particularly as it correlates with the midday and afternoon, when I find I want something less...gloopy. As such, I'm reluctantly seeking the possibility of replacing it with something else. In that vein, I'd very much appreciate if you could provide me with some suggestions.

I'm an open book in terms of suggestions but, frustratingly, I am quite picky about what I deem acceptable, let alone good. The general parameters would be something green, as I have other 'colours' covered in my wardrobe (citruses are yellow and white, for example; an 'aquatic' like Oud Minerale is simply shades of grey/black/silver). Quite how that greenery smells, I'm open-minded. If it is green+ something else, this would be fine, however I would quite like to start by investigating fougeres before I go straying too far from BdJ. Herbs are good - I am also very open to a lovely crisp, dry lavender scent - but so would be something mildly oakmossy (no dank old man smells though, please, nor anything too pungent).

I am currently looking and/or have samples on the way of the following:

Villoresi Wild Lavender
Diptyque Eau de Minthe
Chanel Egoiste Platinum
Heeley Athenean

As I say, I'm open to ideas, anything from Green Irish Tweed type aroma (which, to me, is like clean shower gel musks, iris, and then some green notes), to something that is more classical, perhaps retro, with a solid, masculine, deep-yet-clean oakmoss base. I've tried a few modern oakmosses, in the likes of Atelier's Bergamot scent, yet I haven't found a happy medium between that sort of light/crisp/dry and almost feminine airiness, and then the rugged, dank, leathery oakmoss of Gucci Nobile and other vintage fragrances. I had Dior's Eau for Men pencilled in as a potential replacement for BdJ if I ever tired of it, eventhough it's not really to my taste as it's more of a 'purple floral' scent, which tend to be overtly feminine in my opinion. It also dries down to a woody amber base, so would require an extensive re-sampling period, which I will probably try to do if I can find a bottle for a reasonable price (its discontinuation is another factor that means I'm not going straight for it).

The only other request would be to avoid sweet notes, as this is the main issue with Beau de Jour. As another example, I've also gone off Aventus since having covid as well, as the sweetness of that really dominates and makes me feel slightly nauseous at certain times. So, something a little drier, and not sweet, would be good - but I know people will interpret that in different ways, so don't try to avoid sweetness in its entirety. It's not like I'm looking for a stone-cold fragrance, just one that ideally doesn't dry down in to vanillic-amber.

The meanness is sort of tongue-in-cheek and mainly for rhetorical reasons. However, I do quite like the idea of something that evokes timeless masculinity - rather than meanness.

I've tried a shed load of scents, from Rive Gauche to Rogue Perfumery's retro fragrances. I'm open-minded about niche/designer but tend to find more satisfaction in the slightly less-than-mainstream designer market, or the established and not-extortionate niche. My most recent 'trials' were with Bois du Portgual and Viking, neither of which quite cut it.
I have just introduced a wonderful green fragrance that you might want to know more about. You can read a review here:
Before creating it I ordered samples of several US-based green fragrances, none of which I cared for. I think it's challenging to get the right balance!
 
May 4, 2021
The only other request would be to avoid sweet notes, as this is the main issue with Beau de Jour.


When you say Beau de Jour I assume you are referring to the EDP from the Signature Collection (clear/frosted bottle). Have you tried Beau de Jour from the Private Blend (black bottle)? I find that it lacks much of the sweetness of the former.
 

HMan

Active member
Mar 14, 2020
Tom Ford Fougere
The OP mentioned "something that is more classical, perhaps retro, with a solid, masculine, deep-yet-clean oakmoss base," which immediately brought to mind French Affair by Ex Nihilo. It's a modern chypre and smells fairly sophisticated and serious to me. Don't let the word "chypre" turn you off. Although typically associated with women's fragrances, this "chypre" has enough "meanness" to make it unisex. It's not a pretty, frilly perfume.

Somebody else already mentioned Chanel Paris-Edimbourg for a spicy juniper green scent. I've sampled this one a number of times and agree that it's a spicy, green, woody, juniper scent. However, I could never get past the slight medicinal note that a lot of people pick up on. It's OK at first, but then the medicinal note seems to become more prominent in the dry down. I hate to say it, but I find that note reminiscent of Bengay, a liniment for sore muscles and joints sold in the US.

Tom Ford Vert des Bois, which was also mentioned previously, is a fragrance I'm personally familiar with. It's definitely a green woody fragrance that may fit the bill, but beware, it's not light and airy well into the dry down, and there's something about it that you may not necessarily consider sweet but rather goopy. I think if the top notes lasted longer, to keep it more airy and transparent, I'd probably wear it more often.

Speaking of Tom Ford, you may want to try Tom Ford Fougere Platine. It's greenish, not sweet or goopy (IMO), and has a retro feel but with a modern twist—more modern than, say, the well-constructed stuff from Rogue Perfumery.

I would also suggest you sample Atelier Cologne Emeraude Agar. I don't recall seeing it mentioned above. It's one of those oud (agarwood) fragrances that doesn't really feature a noticeable oud note, synthetic or otherwise. Rather, it's a moderately spicy, aromatic, green, woody fragrance with just a pinch of sweetness to keep it from turning acerbic. It's got an airy, transparent feel in keeping with the traditional cologne style, but it's not a cologne per se, and it does carry a certain gravitas.

Also mentioned previously, Frederic Malle French Lover may be what you're looking for. It's dry, peppery, green, aromatic, and woody. I've worn both the original French Lover (when it was called Bois d'Orage) as well as the current version that got reformulated when Estée Lauder acquired Editions de Parfums Frédéric Malle. Despite all the negative hype about reformulations, I can say that the reformulated French Lover is very close to the original and IMO better. In fact, many people probably would not notice any difference at all. I actually find the newer version more wearable, as there was an undefinable, prickly, penetrating note in the original version that wore on me, so that after a while I would always end up washing it off. That prickly note, I'm glad to say, has been either toned down or replaced by something that serves the same purpose but without being so irritating.

Lastly, regarding L'Homme Rochas (released in 2020), I have that one too. I agree with the barbershop assessment mentioned elsewhere but must warn you that if the sweetness in Beau De Jour is too much, this one may definitely be out. I do like L'Homme Rochas but don't wear it often. The sweetness is that ambery tonka bean type that shows up most often in lower budget fragrances. That's not to say it's bad—do check it out. But I just don't care for that specific kind of sweetness. The quality of the materials in L'Homme Rochas is not in the same league as Tom Ford and a lot of other brands mentioned in this post.
Fougere Platine is the only Ford I own, but I love it, very dark green, but manages to be bright somehow, and absolutely no sweetness. There's a touch of Rive Gauche in there too, but I actually like Platine even more, it just feels more interesting to me.

Parfum d' Empire's Fougere Bengal is another one I like a lot, the mint imparts a wonderful green undertone alongside all the brown from tobacco and hay. The combination of the two being far greater than the individual accords.
 

slpfrsly

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Apr 1, 2019
When you say Beau de Jour I assume you are referring to the EDP from the Signature Collection (clear/frosted bottle). Have you tried Beau de Jour from the Private Blend (black bottle)? I find that it lacks much of the sweetness of the former.
It's practically identical to my nose. In fact I'd say the Private Blend is marginally sweeter and more ambery.
 

slpfrsly

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Apr 1, 2019
Have you tried Fougere d'Argent by Tom Ford?

Yes. Not bad, but a boat load of tonka in the base means it's not the sort of scent I'd opt for. I do think FdA is (another) iteration of TF's fougere, which he's tried to make at least twice before in Gucci Envy and Tom Ford for Men. I think Envy in particular is a modernisation of Gucci Nobile (a non-TF fragrance, one he inherited, so to speak), which, to my nose, is a prime example of the luxury everyman fragrance that Chanel now make in Bleu de Chanel. The problem I have with TF's fougeres is that the ones still available are annoyingly sweet - including FdA. They're not bad fragrances, in fact they're very good and I wore TFFM for about 18 months, but if I'm wearing something daily, as hopefully I've conveyed earlier in the thread (but perhaps failed to), I'm finding it tiring to smell sweet after 1pm. I'd prefer something a bit drier. In fact, the appeal of Nobile, and perhaps Envy as well, but particularly Nobile, is that it dries down to a dry base. It's as much a rather cheap sandalwood to my nose as it is oakmoss and that's probably what appeals to most people. Obviously, the price and availability is ridiculous, and makes it a non-starter in terms of using as a work scent. I've tried Floris' version of Gucci Envy and it's not bad at all but it fails in the same way by bringing out the sweet notes. I'd prefer something a tad more formal I think, something more in the mould of Nobile - oakmoss and greenery is good, but I think the appeal really is the way it blends notes and ideas to create something of an 'everyman, everywhere' fragrance.

On that note, I'm also open to anise. I'm starting to realise that I'm really looking to find a solid heart and base, which might mean plundering the vintage market. There have been plenty of suggestions so far, so thanks for those. I haven't bought any samples yet but will do so in due course.
 

rum

Moderator
Moderator
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Mar 17, 2011
Have you tried Fougere d'Argent by Tom Ford?
It's my only TF and I am actually quite critical of the brand. I don't see it as green though. It's definitely one of these 'new age' fougeres, sans the oakmoss (and at times lacking any real lavender as well).

Another TF the OP might consider is Noir Anthracite. Now discontinued, but still easy enough to find.
 

Mr G

Well-known member
Feb 29, 2012
It's my only TF and I am actually quite critical of the brand. I don't see it as green though. It's definitely one of these 'new age' fougeres, sans the oakmoss (and at times lacking any real lavender as well).

Another TF the OP might consider is Noir Anthracite. Now discontinued, but still easy enough to find.
Interesting... it's also the only TF that I own a full bottle of. You're right, of course, not really a green fragrance though.
 

HouseofKei

New member
Oct 19, 2021
Your post made me think of one of my fresh go-to scents - Pour un homme de Caron. Whilst it is sweet with vanilla middle, the lavender dries down more powdery than sweet. I have found it a great companion scent.
 

slpfrsly

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Apr 1, 2019
Wow. Hard to know where to start.

I would have suggested Fougere Royale but that is sweet also.

I like Nasamatto Nudiflorum as as “green” (to my kind leather) but I am a lone voice in likening this one.

Vetiver Extrordinare is green and dry but perhaps too pungent as the day drags on.

If you like BdJ so much - I think you need to try Antica Caruso by Profumum Roma. A European style barbershop Fougere. A smashing scent
I still haven't tried Fougere Royale so will definitely make sure to do so. I'm not really looking for leather or vetiver as prominent notes - green leathers are nice, but it would cross over in to one of the other tones/colours I am trying to meet (black/brown) with another fragrance (at the moment it's still between one of several - Michael for Men, Noir Anthracite, Atman Xaman, among others).

I have been bitterly disappointed by Profumum Roma, to the point of finding them to be a generally awful, rip-off brand with substandard perfumes and excellent branding. But I will take your recommendation as it comes. Thanks.
 

slpfrsly

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Apr 1, 2019
Dior Eau Sauvage Parfum 2017 I'm sure you have already tried this one but it's the perfect work serious fragrance.
Yes, good suggestion. I should revisit this. I tried the 2013 one and it made me sick and gave me a headache every time I tried it, which put me off the 2017 version. I should have worn it more as I don't really have a scent memory of this. I think it could be promising, thanks.
 

slpfrsly

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Apr 1, 2019
I might recommend looking at Enrico Coveri pour homme. It's green, herbal (but not overly so) and while its drier and less sweet than things like Tsar or Fougere Royale, it isn't too dry. It's from the 80s but I wouldn't call it an old man smell at all, pretty classic and timeless, somewhat conservative masculine.
Thanks, noted.
What about French Lover?
Not sure it's really what I'm looking for, looks more woody than fougere-like, but I've been fairly impressed by Malle so far (only one half dud in Bigarade) so will give it a go. That said, I am probably looking for something a bit more trad in the fresh herbal fougere opening. Angelica seems to be the most prominent green note and that leans fairly earthy.
Eloge du traitre is a very good green fougere. No sweetness, niche, but not extortionary prices.

I am currently loving Synthetic jungle, as green as it gets, with a very nice light, but long lasting, dry mossy leathery drydown. But I wonder if that might indeed be too pungent for what you are thinking about.

cacio
Thanks, was not aware of either of these.
You may have tried many or all of these, but a few that come to mind:

Geo F Trumper Wild Fern - so old it doesn't feel dated, or at least it might not, and a prototypical green fougere with a big lavender note and no 80s power accords
Lorenzo Villoresi Uomo - everyone is different as far as longevity with this one, but it's got herbs aplenty and a delightful drydown that for me makes it through a work day; stunning natural feel
L'Homme Rochas - the tonka might be too sweet for you, but I don't find it overbearing, and I usually do when it comes to sweet bases; no lavender but herbs and a sort of barbershop feel atop ambroxan and tonka and a bit of patch isolate
Diptyque Eau de Menthe - barbershop without being staid or stuffy at all, and really a uniquely green fragrance
Guerlain Vetiver Extreme - take the original, strip out the tobacco, and lay in some green and herbal notes (chiefly tarragon); not so much "Extreme" as "Vetiver Vert"
Pascal Morabito Or Black - utterly distinctive; lavender shaving foam laid over leather and a bit of amber; ; it goes on green and a bit wild and dries down to something like a barber's hands after a day spent with lather and strops
Good suggestions, thanks. I have bought some Trumper samples but they are apparently blindly selected. If I don't get Wild Fern I'll contact them directly and ask for it. Uomo is worth revisiting, I was more impressed by Acqua di Colonia when I sampled Villoresi but that was in part due to seeking a more citric-centric fragrance. Only Guerlain Vetiver leaps out as being not really to my taste (because of vetiver).
 

slpfrsly

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Apr 1, 2019
Also adding Knize Forest, Bogart Signature, Amouage Bracken
Thanks, haven't tried any of these.
"Green, clean(ish), sort-of-mean, dry and not overly sweet, work-appropriate masculine fragrance"

Basically you just described Creed - Green Irish Tweed. And it just so happens to be among the most loved scents by enthusiasts.
GIT is the upper limit for what I'd consider appropriate here: it's right on the edge of sporty-casual. I've tried it enough to know I'm not satisfied by it for this purpose - good fragrance though it is. It's more of an iris/purple floral scent to my nose, something that obviously is fairly common now with Dior and Prada etc., with the addition of musky-sporty notes that take it away from woke-safe to more...smart casual. I'd opt for Aventus, Viking, and Bois du Portugal over GIT for this purpose, I think, but I use it as a reference point as I don't want to entirely rule out fragrances that may be similar. For instance, the new Carven scents are very good and imitate much of GIT. I wouldn't want to miss out of suggestions like that through association but GIT isn't really what I'm looking for.
Rogue Mousse Illuminee.
Decent scent, a bit on the soapy side if I remember. I still (hopefully) have a sample of this. I remember comparing it to Roja Dove's...Danger? The soapy one with cumin. The Roja was much better as I recall, at least to my nose.
 

slpfrsly

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Apr 1, 2019
Have you tried anything from Parfum d'Empire? Marc-Antoine Corticchiato is an absolute genius with green scents. For your purposes I'd especially call out his Corsica Furiosa and Iskander -- the former being drier and the latter slightly sweeter and more citrusy.


I was going to suggest Or Black too, but wondered if it was green enough to qualify. I suppose it is, but it's stupendous at any level.
Yes, Fougere Bengale is a great scent but a bit too much Bengal to be wearable, in my opinion. I'd be interested in trying more from the house.
Some great suggestions already and I'll also throw Floris Elite into the mix - think it definitely classes as 'green' and always gives an air of confidence in the workplace!
This has been touched upon earlier in this thread. Decent suggestion, thanks.
Sounds great, but discontinued and apparently quite rare?

Caswell Massey Greenbriar (Gold cap version), this version is pretty green and herbal, with a light amber in the dry down. If you like Gucci Nobile you may like this.

You could possibly go with the newer (confusingly named "Heritage" despite being newer) version of Greenbriar but I think that is along the lines of Green Irish Tweed/Cool Water. Odd that its more expensive than the gold cap version.

They sell both versions on their website at least right now.
Is this a GIT clone? I'm probably not looking for such a scent if so.

Carven Pour Homme might be worth a sniff?
Good suggestion, it's a very good fragrance, same goes for L'eau Intense. I do struggle with purple florals, I think I'd prefer something a tad drier and less sweet as well - as I recall, both scents dry down to a (lovely...) woody amber base. That's what I'm ideally trying to avoid but that is a good suggestion: good fragrance(s).
 

slpfrsly

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Apr 1, 2019
Eau d’Ikar
The notes don't look like something I'd enjoy. I had this suggested before, for a different request, and I remember struggling to find a sample. Vetiver, mastic, and iris - all of which I don't particularly like. The green part looks good though.
How about green-aromatic ones, something like Whip (Le Galion) - Cravache (Piguet) - Fiero (Xerjoff)? Out of the three, Fiero is more opulent, though also rumored to have been reformulated recently... None of these are sweet though, in the sense that there is no modern amber-sweetness in the base if that's what's getting on your nerves.
Yeah, they sound great. Aromatics are good as long as there's enough heft to them. I've been using Fleurs de Cedrat as my citrus scent in the summer and have also used it for work on warmer days. But its staying power is a joke. A green aromatic that dries down in to a true, long-lasting base wouldn't be unwelcome. I think I'm more likely to find what I want in a fougere but that's just a hunch, all three suggestions sound promising. Thanks. Xerjoff have been hit and miss for me. Naxos is exceptional, their bergamot scent (??) was odd and disappointing.
Tom Ford Noir Anthracite
Decent, but probably more leather-centric than I'd hope for. I'm still considering this as much casual/cool weather fragrance i.e. something to wear this time of year in the evenings, something that suits a leather jacket etc. But it does straddle the line between green, old school scent, and modern birch/leather. Thanks. I might risk wearing it to work and see how I feel about it.
The new H24 by Hermès sounds right.
Wasn't impressed by this. Gummy and a tad sweet with a clary sage aromachemical heart, if I recall. Alas I spilt my sample so wasn't able to test extensively - the right idea, just not sure it's the kind of base I'm seeking. In fact, I think it's almost the exact opposite.
 

tinfoilhatdude

Well-known member
Jan 20, 2019
Do you think Patchouli Intense by Nicolai might be suitable?


There is very little patch in that one, it mostly reflects a very french 'house accord'; very thick, pretty sweet, and very 'perfumy'.


In my opinion:

Gucci Nobile would definitely be my #1 pick
Caron L'Anarchiste
RL Polo - Warner or Cosmair formula
Davidoff GoodLife
Dior Eau Sauvage Parfum (2017)
Bath & Body Works Forest
Houbigant Duc de Vervins
Pascal Morabito Or Black
R de Capucci - This has rose in the middle, but greenery built all around it.
Joop! What About Adam - All about the Tomato Leaf baby
Basile Uomo



For me, these come off too sweet. But it could be the humidity & heat where I live. YMMV:

VC&A Tsar (older, opaque bottle)
Geoffrey Beene Bowling Greene
Fragrances of Ireland Patrick



These are more bracing:

Lanvin Homme
Estee Lauder Balafre
Davidoff Classic
 
Last edited:

MattJP

Well-known member
Feb 14, 2013
Decent, but probably more leather-centric than I'd hope for. I'm still considering this as much casual/cool weather fragrance i.e. something to wear this time of year in the evenings, something that suits a leather jacket etc. But it does straddle the line between green, old school scent, and modern birch/leather. Thanks. I might risk wearing it to work and see how I feel about it.
I found Anthracite quite suitable for work and wore it often when I was still working. And it had its fans there, too.
I feel the leather is more in the background with mineral and wood most prevalent with dry, dusty green on top. It does have a throwback but modern feel to it which I find nicely done.
Plus it's one of my wife's favorites, which is a god thing (I can't say the same about New York Intense).
 
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slpfrsly

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 1, 2019
I second Bogart Signature, Tsar and Vetiver extreme recommendations and add:
- GB Bowling Green (the most recent formulation - crystal clear juice): They transformed it in an almost aquatic lime/green fragrance, if It makes sense...
- Jacques Bogart Eau Fresh
- Acqua di parma Colonia Club
Thanks, will try the ones I haven't already. I forgot about Colonia Club. Weird scent. Sort of like a minty GIT if I recall. It's been a long time since I've sampled it so will revisit. Had an amberwoody base, though, as most Acqua di Parmas do, annoyingly. Will give it a go though. I do quite like Acqua di Parma but find, although they're quite 'accessible', they don't really last the course. I really ought to try their boutique range but they mostly appear to experiments on the 'balsamic Colonia' theme, which isn't what I'm looking for.
I would recommend Fahrenheit Cologne. If you get a sample, try to judge it as much as possible as its own scent. Try as hard as you can to forget that it's related to Fahrenheit.

It's not green, but it's masculine and work appropriate (and maybe you already tried it)... but Dior Homme 2020? I'm a big fan, so I figured I would throw that out there.
Interesting, not something I've come across. Dior Homme 2020 is definitely not what I'm after. I don't like the original Fahrenheit and it has two prominent notes I also dislike - violet and vetiver - but I will keep it in mind. Thanks.
Prin - Mriga
I didn't put a price suggestion but £190 for 30ml is above what I consider sensible; even if it's the most magical fragrance in the world!
Vintage Green by Banana Republic might be a good fit too.
...and to follow on from that, I'm really looking for something a bit 'better' than this. Same goes for similar tiers, like Zara fragrances. It appears to be a clone of Hermes' Un Jardin? Decent fragrance but very feminine to my nose. I'd like something that dries down in to more of a mossy-green, masculine base than that.
Etro Palais Jamais was the first thing that came to mind with the thread title.

Reading your post, it is very much not a barbershop Fougere but more a green, mildly smoky/leathery (mean), semi-tea like, vetiver and moss scent.

I wear it to work often, which doesn’t exactly mean that makes it office appropriate, but I’d be shocked if anyone considered it sweet.
Sounds intriguing. Worth trying at least, despite the vetiver. I'm not overly mad on smoke but if it's a dash, then that could be acceptable. I do think birch is probably the closest thing to 'old' oakmoss, and pairing the two sounds good. The vetiver does worry me but I will seek out a sample. Thanks.
The new Chanel Paris-Edimbourg for a spicy juniper green scent.
I really like the prospect of this. I'm half tempted to blind buy a bottle but I just did that for the first time in a long time and was disappointed, so don't want a repeat. Sampling Chanel is a nightmare though! My only concern for this is that it may be more top and mid note oriented, with a more unisex or nondescript base. This is all guesswork on my part though...
Wow. I love St. Clement’s (and vetiver) but find it more or less devoid of vetiver. More of an updated clean musky Eau de Cologne.

If you find it vetiver-centric, stay far, far away from Palais Jamais.
Ah, that's a shame. Thanks for following up.
Do you think Patchouli Intense by Nicolai might be suitable?
I haven't tried it, but it's the right sort of brand and appears to be the right sort of scent. I like the look of the sandalwood; I'm wary of the fairly highly-rated amber and vanilla! I'm slightly wary about the ratings on its performance as well. It appears to be nuclear? I'd definitely want something that dries down in to more of a musty skin scent after an hour or two, but then lasts like than for 8+ hours a la an old fougere.
Maybe you can try Estee Lauder for Men. This one looks wonderful!
Will do, vintage sounds good. I might have to fill in my background knowledge of green fougeres as it's the one category I really disliked coming in to this due to bad experiences with cheap 'green' aftershave type fragrances when I was young.
Though I think you can never go wrong with GIT, I would also suggest Creed Himalaya. It carries some of the clean, fresh notes from GIT but with more crisp woods.

Another I think is worth checking out is Moschino Forever. Don't let the fact that Moschino is a designer stand in the way of something surprisingly good; It's very fresh and clean, light green to my nose, quite masculine, and perfect for the office.
I really disliked Himalaya unfortunately, there's something oddly unnatural about it. As much as people bash Creed now I think they were producing some horrorshows in the late 90s and 2000s tbh, and Himalaya is up there with Silver Mountain Water as being just...odd to my nose. Odd and discordant. I have tried the Moschino, it didn't leave an impression on me. But then I wore D&G The One Gentleman for a while when I was at university and it was something similar, a sort of modern fougere in the Kurkdjian style, all sweet and safe, with a dash of herbs and spices. The Moschino sounds pretty similar and I do like the idea of anise. Thanks.
A few suggestions -

R de Cappucci
Lubin Itasca
Paco Rabanne pour Homme vtg (the dry-down might be a bit sweet for you, but it's not a synthetic sweetness like BdJ which the Signature version I find lacking on so many levels, it's got a wonderful note of honey, and is more warm than sweet)
Tom Ford Vert des Bois
Dior Granville
Dunhill "classic" (1984)
Dunhill Blend 30 (if you can find it)
Gucci Nobile (if you can find it)

Agree with some of the other suggestions.
Plenty there, the majority of which I haven't tried. Vert des Bois is interesting, it's like a niche Brut to my nose, yet a completely different texture and thickness. I can see why you suggest it but, after initially being very impressed by it, I wore it again and hated it. Nobile has been touched upon, the rest sound plausible. Thanks.
 

slpfrsly

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 1, 2019
Having mentioned Acqua di Parma, does anyone have any views on Quercia? If I remember correctly I categorised it as a work fragrance for a masochist, it was a weirdly offputting fresh oakmoss scent, but perhaps I misjudged it. I didn't give it much heed. Does anyone wear this? Does anyone like it?
 

tinfoilhatdude

Well-known member
Jan 20, 2019
Having mentioned Acqua di Parma, does anyone have any views on Quercia? If I remember correctly I categorised it as a work fragrance for a masochist, it was a weirdly offputting fresh oakmoss scent, but perhaps I misjudged it. I didn't give it much heed. Does anyone wear this? Does anyone like it?


I thoroughly enjoyed my sample of Quercia! In fact, I may look and see if there's another wearing, thank you!


I do admit, it may be challenging for some. It seems more leathery, spicy, woody, if memory serves me.

The aroma chemicals are noticable, meaning you can sense designer level materials, but they are not harsh as in the DS/BDC/Y group of modern 'blue' frags.

For me it would be bottle worthy, but I would definitely suggest sampling before buying. I would take Quercia over GGA, they are in the same league. In other words, they are not dissimilar.
 

slpfrsly

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 1, 2019
I thoroughly enjoyed my sample of Quercia! In fact, I may look and see if there's another wearing, thank you!


I do admit, it may be challenging for some. It seems more leathery, spicy, woody, if memory serves me.

The aroma chemicals are noticable, meaning you can sense designer level materials, but they are not harsh as in the DS/BDC/Y group of modern 'blue' frags.

For me it would be bottle worthy, but I would definitely suggest sampling before buying. I would take Quercia over GGA, they are in the same league. In other words, they are not dissimilar.
Thank you for your reply, very helpful. I don't remember it being as rugged or dark as you describe it. I will seek out a sample and refresh my memory. I'm surprised to see the note list has tonka and amber - I don't remember any sort of sweetness to it, it seemed like a quite stark, hairspray-ish green scent?
 

PrinceRF

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 3, 2020
The notes look great. Obviously it's a GIT clone but it might be decent. I was also looking at Great Jones from Bond #9, as I'm looking for something a bit more mossy and traditional than GIT, at least initially, so I'll keep this in mind. It's hard to sample the brand in the UK.
I liken Chez Bond to GIT's "younger brother" - it's very similar but with a less powdery/mature vibe.
 

slpfrsly

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 1, 2019

Green Water by Jacques Fath​

Fath is a bit of a weird brand based on what I've tried. The notes do look good with this, though. Thanks.
My favorite green fragrances in my collection are Commodity Bergamot and Banana Republic 78 Vintage Green. They're both unisex though, both citrusy, so they may not quite have what you're looking for. Vintage Green has a sweetness to it, though Commodity Bergamot is drier and a bit more mossy I'd say.
Probably not quite what I'm after, no, as I feel I have really fresh, pure citruses covered already.
Odin 02 Owari, Commes des Garçons Wondergreen
Is that Amazingreen rather than Wondergreen? Looks a bit too weird for my liking, as is the case with most CdG - innovative, but not sure they stack up in the final analysis of wearing the stuff regularly. Owari looks more citric than I'm hoping for as well. I'd like to try it as it's an orange scent, but possibly not for this sort of fragrance.
Great suggestions, especially the Capucci. Brisk, dry, green, mossy chypre. Always remains stout.

And Paco Rabanne already remains soapy and fairly rugged on me. To FWV's point, there's honey, but it's a really light seasoning, more sharp than sweet in this context.

I wonder if some other older green feminine chypres might fit the bill, if many fougeres tend to dry into a bit too sweet of a mode? Perhaps Givenchy III, or Chanel Cristalle, or Sisley Eau de Campagne?
I think I may do well to just sample a whole load of vintage fougeres (and possibly chypres as well) so I have enough reference points to either hone done what I want/don't want, or to actually find 'the one' organically. The Paco sounds worth trying and I see that Great Jones, which I mentioned earlier, is a boutique clone of the Paco. So, thanks, good stuff. In terms of the vintage feminine fragrances, they're probably not what I'm after, no. But thanks.
Chanel Platinum Egoiste and/or Tom Ford's Grey Vetiver EDP. I think both are well, not exactly mean but rather give off an impersonal vibe, almost connoting superiority.
Good suggestions, thanks. TF Grey Vetiver (the EDT though) was an early like for me but, alas, vetiver doesn't do well on my skin - it just leaves me feeling nauseous. I will sample Egoiste Platinum for sure.
I always found Bleecker St a great green but I’m afraid it has a more gourmand base that would enter sweet zone.
I haven't tried this but I have tried Purple Label, and that wasn't one I liked. I'll chalk it up as a Bond to sample though. Thanks.
The OP mentioned "something that is more classical, perhaps retro, with a solid, masculine, deep-yet-clean oakmoss base," which immediately brought to mind French Affair by Ex Nihilo. It's a modern chypre and smells fairly sophisticated and serious to me. Don't let the word "chypre" turn you off. Although typically associated with women's fragrances, this "chypre" has enough "meanness" to make it unisex. It's not a pretty, frilly perfume.

Somebody else already mentioned Chanel Paris-Edimbourg for a spicy juniper green scent. I've sampled this one a number of times and agree that it's a spicy, green, woody, juniper scent. However, I could never get past the slight medicinal note that a lot of people pick up on. It's OK at first, but then the medicinal note seems to become more prominent in the dry down. I hate to say it, but I find that note reminiscent of Bengay, a liniment for sore muscles and joints sold in the US.

Tom Ford Vert des Bois, which was also mentioned previously, is a fragrance I'm personally familiar with. It's definitely a green woody fragrance that may fit the bill, but beware, it's not light and airy well into the dry down, and there's something about it that you may not necessarily consider sweet but rather goopy. I think if the top notes lasted longer, to keep it more airy and transparent, I'd probably wear it more often.

Speaking of Tom Ford, you may want to try Tom Ford Fougere Platine. It's greenish, not sweet or goopy (IMO), and has a retro feel but with a modern twist—more modern than, say, the well-constructed stuff from Rogue Perfumery.

I would also suggest you sample Atelier Cologne Emeraude Agar. I don't recall seeing it mentioned above. It's one of those oud (agarwood) fragrances that doesn't really feature a noticeable oud note, synthetic or otherwise. Rather, it's a moderately spicy, aromatic, green, woody fragrance with just a pinch of sweetness to keep it from turning acerbic. It's got an airy, transparent feel in keeping with the traditional cologne style, but it's not a cologne per se, and it does carry a certain gravitas.

Also mentioned previously, Frederic Malle French Lover may be what you're looking for. It's dry, peppery, green, aromatic, and woody. I've worn both the original French Lover (when it was called Bois d'Orage) as well as the current version that got reformulated when Estée Lauder acquired Editions de Parfums Frédéric Malle. Despite all the negative hype about reformulations, I can say that the reformulated French Lover is very close to the original and IMO better. In fact, many people probably would not notice any difference at all. I actually find the newer version more wearable, as there was an undefinable, prickly, penetrating note in the original version that wore on me, so that after a while I would always end up washing it off. That prickly note, I'm glad to say, has been either toned down or replaced by something that serves the same purpose but without being so irritating.

Lastly, regarding L'Homme Rochas (released in 2020), I have that one too. I agree with the barbershop assessment mentioned elsewhere but must warn you that if the sweetness in Beau De Jour is too much, this one may definitely be out. I do like L'Homme Rochas but don't wear it often. The sweetness is that ambery tonka bean type that shows up most often in lower budget fragrances. That's not to say it's bad—do check it out. But I just don't care for that specific kind of sweetness. The quality of the materials in L'Homme Rochas is not in the same league as Tom Ford and a lot of other brands mentioned in this post.
Thanks, nice long list. The Chanel is one I'm very interested in trying, I'm tentatively hopeful about it, although performance and/or feminine qualities are a concern. The Tom Fords are decent - I find Vert des Bois to be an upmarket Brut but with a totally different texture to it, with a thick/creamy anise-greenery, rather than something mossy or (now) watery) - but I wasn't bowled over by them, particularly considering the price. There's just something very particular about TF fragrances and I think I struggle to wear his scents day in, day out. The other suggestions are duly noted, thanks.
Your post made me think of one of my fresh go-to scents - Pour un homme de Caron. Whilst it is sweet with vanilla middle, the lavender dries down more powdery than sweet. I have found it a great companion scent.
I've tried this, not quite what I'm looking for. As you say, it's sweet and powdery. I want something more on the dry and non-sweet side, but thanks.
There is very little patch in that one, it mostly reflects a very french 'house accord'; very thick, pretty sweet, and very 'perfumy'.


In my opinion:

Gucci Nobile would definitely be my #1 pick
Caron L'Anarchiste
RL Polo - Warner or Cosmair formula
Davidoff GoodLife
Dior Eau Sauvage Parfum (2017)
Bath & Body Works Forest
Houbigant Duc de Vervins
Pascal Morabito Or Black
R de Capucci - This has rose in the middle, but greenery built all around it.
Joop! What About Adam - All about the Tomato Leaf baby
Basile Uomo



For me, these come off too sweet. But it could be the humidity & heat where I live. YMMV:

VC&A Tsar (older, opaque bottle)
Geoffrey Beene Bowling Greene
Fragrances of Ireland Patrick



These are more bracing:

Lanvin Homme
Estee Lauder Balafre
Davidoff Classic
Solid list, thanks for these.
Probably off the mark - no moss- but you mentioned anise. Alien Man is an oddly green fragrance with some anise and vanilla. I think it’s pretty great.
You're correct, sadly off the mark! But no harm in trying. Thanks.
I know a lot of higher end/niche suggestions are being considered but I would mention:
Platinum Egoiste is a big office fave for me
Guerlain Homme L'eau Boisee is ultra fresh and green and no sweetness
Thank you, the Guerlain is noted. It's the right sort of point in the market that I'm hoping for. New niche doesn't interest or appeal to me in the manner that tried and tested, good quality designer/mid tier established niche scents do.
+1 on Dior Granville

House of Matriarch's Bonsai may fit the bill

Couteau de Poche's Fumabat may be "the" answer.
Notes for the Dior look decent - although, I've generally found that 'pine' notes are much less pleasant than 'fir' notes as per the note list of fragrances. Quite what that actually means, I don't know haha, as you'd think they're effectively one and the same, but the difference is stark. Anyway, worth trying to see if the pine note is better than pine-heavy fragrances of yesteryear (Drakkar Noir is the epitome of a 'bad' green smell, in my opinion). The other two are prohibitive in terms of price and availability, I've given up on that end of the niche market as anything other than aromatic amusement.
I haven't seen Ormonde Man from Ormonde Jayne mentioned yet. Perhaps that one matches.
I'll give it a go but I thought Ormonde Jayne's tobacco scent was awful after hearing it hyped up for a good while. Thanks, I'll keep it in mind. It's the right sort of scent, that's for sure, though not sure about the oud and vetiver - nor do I want something primarily spicy.
 

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