Givenchy III (new) vs "Les Mythiques" formulation?

grayspoole

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Feb 4, 2014
No responses yet, so I’ll add my two cents...

I have no idea about the current version but the Les Mythiques version is a dryer, woodier, and more aldehydic version of the original. It has its fans, but I prefer the first formulation.

So I am now wondering if you ever tried the original GIII? It is one of my favorites, an exceptionally balanced and complex chypre. And unlike many other vintage perfumes, the original is not very hard to find at reasonable prices.
 

cacio

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Nov 5, 2010
I'm curious too. I liked the original. But I also think that green chypres can fare better than other chypres in reformulation-perhaps it's easier to find drydown replacements for them. Even though they do not smell the same as the original, they can still be satisfying.

cacio
 

Cook.bot

Flâneuse
Basenotes Plus
Jan 6, 2012
And unlike many other vintage perfumes, the original is not very hard to find at reasonable prices.

I was just saying that very thing to someone else this week. GIII, in all its concentrations, has remained a remarkable bargain on the vintage resale market. It also seems to hold onto its structure quite well, even in fairly old bottles.

But I also think that green chypres can fare better than other chypres in reformulation-perhaps it's easier to find drydown replacements for them. Even though they do not smell the same as the original, they can still be satisfying.

This seems to be true. The new version of Cabochard has given me hope that some of my favorite green chypres may continue to exist in recognizable formulations. And in the case of the new Cabochard and the new Rochas Moustache "Original 1949", they even managed to improve the bottles.
 

Dane

Basenotes Dependent
Jan 9, 2002
Thank you all for your input. I ended up ordering what I think is the 'Les Mythiques' version but knows.

I have tried Giii in it's original formulation, but I'm looking for something I can actually wear. The new version may lack much of the depth of the OG, but it has its place, at least in my collection. Sometimes I just crave that bitter, soapy, greenness without the guilded florals. If that makes sense.
 

grayspoole

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Feb 4, 2014
Thank you all for your input. I ended up ordering what I think is the 'Les Mythiques' version but knows.

I have tried Giii in it's original formulation, but I'm looking for something I can actually wear. The new version may lack much of the depth of the OG, but it has its place, at least in my collection. Sometimes I just crave that bitter, soapy, greenness without the guilded florals. If that makes sense.

I have never had a problem with the “guilded florals” that lie at the heart of the original GIII, but I can understand that it might make the scent difficult to wear if wafting floral notes is not your thing. For it is certainly true that the tart and bitter bergamot and galbanum opening of vintage GIII moves into an almost honeyed floral middle phase, with rose and hyacinth as the strongest notes within the accord.

I hope you like your bottle when it arrives. Do let us know what you think of it.
 

cacio

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Nov 5, 2010
Interesting point about the florals in green chypres. I do feel too that sometimes too many florals may end up detracting from the stark structure of green chypres. And usually, the reason one likes green chypres is not the florals per se. So a pared down GIII is not necessarily a bad thing.
 

Dane

Basenotes Dependent
Jan 9, 2002
I have never had a problem with the “guilded florals” that lie at the heart of the original GIII, but I can understand that it might make the scent difficult to wear if wafting floral notes is not your thing. For it is certainly true that the tart and bitter bergamot and galbanum opening of vintage GIII moves into an almost honeyed floral middle phase, with rose and hyacinth as the strongest notes within the accord.

I hope you like your bottle when it arrives. Do let us know what you think of it.
I'll let you know. Frankly, I find chypres like this to have an especially important topnote - it's often the only crowd-pleaser in the whole composition. When you buy vintage you always take that risk that the topnotes have turned - and I'm just not educated enough on which vintage to buy and which to avoid.

The never-ending saga of buying vintages. Even versions I've smelled before (as I'm this case), I still have to question if the new is better or worse than the previous formulation. There were a few years when no one knew what to do with oakmoss restrictions - they seemed to have found interesting new solutions, as smelled in the 2019 version of Cabochard. It may not even be in there (fyi, it's not), but they found a way to make it smell amazing.
 

grayspoole

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Feb 4, 2014
I'll let you know. Frankly, I find chypres like this to have an especially important topnote - it's often the only crowd-pleaser in the whole composition. When you buy vintage you always take that risk that the topnotes have turned - and I'm just not educated enough on which vintage to buy and which to avoid.

The never-ending saga of buying vintages. Even versions I've smelled before (as I'm this case), I still have to question if the new is better or worse than the previous formulation. There were a few years when no one knew what to do with oakmoss restrictions - they seemed to have found interesting new solutions, as smelled in the 2019 version of Cabochard. It may not even be in there (fyi, it's not), but they found a way to make it smell amazing.

I have not had any problem buying vintage perfumes with intact top notes, including deep vintage bottles going back to the 1930’s, 40’s, and 50’s that still have beautiful bergamot, galbanum, lavender and many other typical top note Ingredients. I don’t buy vintages to appreciate the basenotes alone: I want to understand the whole structure. But I am extremely picky about what I buy and avoid opened, partial bottles with darkened/oxidized perfume. Perhaps I have just been lucky, but as a result I don’t believe that it is inevitable to find degraded top notes in vintage bottles.

Setting the aside the various vicissitudes of the vintage game, in the end it is a question of what type of chypre appeals to you most. The genre is fairly expansive, encompassing spare and bitter colognes, animalic chypres, floral chypres, and almost ambered fruity chypres. (Not to mention the current feminine pink patchouli and maltol. based “chypres“ which seem to really take things too far, stretchIng the genre into something unrecognizable.)
 

Dane

Basenotes Dependent
Jan 9, 2002
I have not had any problem buying vintage perfumes with intact top notes, including deep vintage bottles going back to the 1930’s, 40’s, and 50’s that still have beautiful bergamot, galbanum, lavender and many other typical top note Ingredients. I don’t buy vintages to appreciate the basenotes alone: I want to understand the whole structure. But I am extremely picky about what I buy and avoid opened, partial bottles with darkened/oxidized perfume. Perhaps I have just been lucky, but as a result I don’t believe that it is inevitable to find degraded top notes in vintage bottles.

Setting the aside the various vicissitudes of the vintage game, in the end it is a question of what type of chypre appeals to you most. The genre is fairly expansive, encompassing spare and bitter colognes, animalic chypres, floral chypres, and almost ambered fruity chypres. (Not to mention the current feminine pink patchouli and maltol. based “chypres“ which seem to really take things too far, stretchIng the genre into something unrecognizable.)
I think I've had a particularly bad run with vintages. I think I'll be happy with the Mythique version, simply for the fact that it's honestly not going to get much wear anyway. I just want it.
 

Dane

Basenotes Dependent
Jan 9, 2002
Well, it arrived - and I got what looks like the latest formulation. Same shape as Mythique bottles, but new box.

And it smells....fine. The huge aldehydic-galbanum is present. The bergamot is not present.

And although I smell no actual oakmoss (none is even listed on the allergen ingredient list), it still smells very retro and sharp as a knife, as a green chypre should.

This version is probably the easiest to wear - it's been deconstructed to remove the plushness of the OG and *streamlined*.

I checked the "batch code" and it says it was made in 2021. I'm not mad, this may be even less plush than the 2007 Mythiques', but it still smells great. She's pretty, prim, floral, and tailored.
 

cacio

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Nov 5, 2010
Thanks for the info. good to know it's still good and sharp, which is what green chypres should do.
 

Dane

Basenotes Dependent
Jan 9, 2002
It sounds as though this 2021 version fit the brief for you, Dane. If I see a tester of this out in a store, I’ll have to give it try.

Where did the bergamot go, I wonder?
It works for me. I figure I'll probably get a vintage bottle of the parfum just for reference, and maybe to give it a bit more depth.

Honestly I think they amped up the aldehydes to a level where it dwarfs any tiny bit of bergamot in there.
 

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