For those who used them, can you tell me how good and how they work the follow ingredients:

Onefragrance

Basenotes Member
Aug 26, 2021
I've noticed that these ingredients are very used in perfumes:

-linalool ?
-limonene ?
-alpha-isomethyl ionone ? ?
-benzil salicilat ?
-butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane ?
-geraniol ?
-benzyl alcohol ?
-citronellol ?
-citral ?
-eugenol ?

So, anybody used these ingredients and how they work in a fragrance?

Probably without them the most fragrances would smell like some EO's mixed with alcohol. lol
 

Septime

Super Member
May 31, 2018
I've noticed that these ingredients are very used in perfumes:

-linalool ?
-limonene ?
-alpha-isomethyl ionone ? ?
-benzil salicilat ?
-butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane ?
-geraniol ?
-benzyl alcohol ?
-citronellol ?
-citral ?
-eugenol ?

So, anybody used these ingredients and how they work in a fragrance?

Probably without them the most fragrances would smell like some EO's mixed with alcohol. lol

I can tell that you probably got that list from product labels, because those aren't necessarily the main ingredients in fragrance, just the ones which have to be listed by name for allergy warning purposes. Most of them are actually found in essential oils, and might be listed for that reason. The only exceptions are alpha-isomethyl ionone (also called methyl ionone or methyl ionone gamma) and butyl methoxydibenzoyl methane (commonly called avobenzone, which isn't actually a fragrance but a kind of sunscreen, probably added as a preservative.)

If you want to be able to look up an ingredient to see what it smells like and how it's used, try the Good Scents Company ingredient database. They also have data on things like recommended amounts, safety regulations, where it's found in nature, what it mixes well with etc.
 

parker25mv

Basenotes Dependent
Oct 12, 2016
-linalool - smells like lavender but more transparent, very commonly used in many different smells
-limonene - (D-limonene) smells a little like crushed up pine needles or the oils from the crushed up peel of a mandarin, somewhat woody and mandarin-orange tangy
-geraniol - sort of a red rose smell, scratchy, kind of wet and dew-like smell, sharp and a little piercing
-citronellol - somewhat lemony but sharp and alcohol-like, also a little more "oily" smelling than geraniol. This might be a smell in some wildflowers, a sharp lemony aspect. Rose varieties that smell a little more on the lemony side have citronellol.
-citral - the most important part of the smell in lemon. all by itself it's a little reminiscent of lemon candies
-eugenol - smells like cloves, smells extremely similar to clove EO
 

Onefragrance

Basenotes Member
Aug 26, 2021
-linalool - smells like lavender but more transparent, very commonly used in many different smells
-limonene - (D-limonene) smells a little like crushed up pine needles or the oils from the crushed up peel of a mandarin, somewhat woody and mandarin-orange tangy
-geraniol - sort of a red rose smell, scratchy, kind of wet and dew-like smell, sharp and a little piercing
-citronellol - somewhat lemony but sharp and alcohol-like, also a little more "oily" smelling than geraniol. This might be a smell in some wildflowers, a sharp lemony aspect. Rose varieties that smell a little more on the lemony side have citronellol.
-citral - the most important part of the smell in lemon. all by itself it's a little reminiscent of lemon candies
-eugenol - smells like cloves, smells extremely similar to clove EO

Thanks Parker for your objective answer!
 

Onefragrance

Basenotes Member
Aug 26, 2021
I saw a question just like this a while ago..

https://www.basenotes.net/threads/281458-chemicals-in-professional-perfumes

Perfumes don't have to have any of those ingredients to snell good. A perfume will not just smell like "essential oil mixed with alcohol" if you don't use any of those ingredients.

These are just ingredients that have to legally be listed if they are in the perfume. They are considered potential allergens in a small minority of people.

They have to be listed even if they are just naturally found in an essential oil that was used. So for example, many essential oils contain linalool, so if an essential oil with natural linalool is used, then linalool has to be listed, but lavender doesn't have to be listed.

Butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane is just a sunscreen. It's not for smell.

There are thousands of possible ingredients that are used in perfumes. Most of these are just hidden under "parfum" since they don't have to legally be listed.

All the ingredients you listed are basic popular ingredients and they smell good on their own, but they're nothing special. As for alpha-isomethyl ionone, that is used in a lot of perfumes, but I personally don't care for the smell of that one, because it smells very strong and not all that pleasant to me, but most people seem to like it.

Thanks AJ!
 

Onefragrance

Basenotes Member
Aug 26, 2021
Septime;5526428[B said:
]I can tell that you probably got that list from product labels[/B], because those aren't necessarily the main ingredients in fragrance, just the ones which have to be listed by name for allergy warning purposes. Most of them are actually found in essential oils, and might be listed for that reason. The only exceptions are alpha-isomethyl ionone (also called methyl ionone or methyl ionone gamma) and butyl methoxydibenzoyl methane (commonly called avobenzone, which isn't actually a fragrance but a kind of sunscreen, probably added as a preservative.)

If you want to be able to look up an ingredient to see what it smells like and how it's used, try the Good Scents Company ingredient database. They also have data on things like recommended amounts, safety regulations, where it's found in nature, what it mixes well with etc.

Yes, thats true. I thought that these ingredients may also be used by some of you guys to make a perfume smell, projecting and last like a good quality perfume- from a store.

Thanks!
 

parker25mv

Basenotes Dependent
Oct 12, 2016
I've noticed that these ingredients are very used in perfumes:
What I think you may not be realising is those listed substances are NOT the main part of the smell in the perfume. They just have to list those particular substances because of legal regulation requirements and potential allergens.
Reading the ingredients will not tell you how to make a perfume that smells a certain way. This is because most of the perfume ingredients are just lumped into the "fragrance parfum" category. The ingredient list is not placed there so you will know everything that's in it or how they make it smell the way it does. The ingredient list is there so the consumer will know some of the things in it that may be due to other specific concerns.

Two reasons they do not give a complete list of everything are due to simplicity, and probably they do not easily want to give away their formulas.
 
Mar 26, 2022
I'll third that. Those are only the components that are required to be listed. The unlisted "secret chemicals" aren't anything sinister, but they are always more important to the character of the fragrance than the listed ingredients.
 

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