Ethyl Pinappple-ates

May 23, 2020
Does anyone have experience with the "ethyl pinappleates" pineapple/brandy molecules?
I have Ethyl Caproate, and wonder about the other molecules which I've never smelled.
The descriptions are from Symrise, and all three seem to have similar smells, but different strength, I listed them in order based on weakest to strongest (assumption).

Some knowledge about each material, use-case, redundancy would be interesting.

Ethyl caprylate (ETHYL OCTANOATE)
Vapor Pressure: 0.224000
Boiling Point: 206.00 to 208.00 °C.
Odor Description: fruity like pineapple and apple, brandy nuance

Ethyl Capronate (ETHYL HEPTANOATE)
Vapor Pressure: 0.680000
Boiling Point: 188.00 to 189.00 °C.
Odor Description: strong, fruity like apple, pineapple and brandy

Ethyl Caproate (ETHYL HEXANOATE)
Vapor Pressure: 1.665000
Boiling Point: 166.00 to 168.00 °C.
Odor Description: strong, sweet-ethereal like pineapple, with nuances of banana and strawberry
 

parker25mv

Basenotes Dependent
Oct 12, 2016
Keep in mind there are two different type of "pineapple" notes. One is the simple and plain diffuse pineapple of a simple ester, pretty much just kind of fruity and vague, the general feel of pineapple without really any of the definition. Sort of like how there are other simple fruity esters that remind of other fruits. Then there is the texture of pineapple. The ACs in the family which includes Pharaone, Galbascone, etc, have both.
You may likely already know all this.

I have not smelled them, but the general trend is as the chain gets longer (hexanoate to heptanoate, for example), it becomes a little less fruity, often more muddled and subdued green. Probably still overall very similar in feel, but just the overall smell pushed a little bit more towards a certain different direction. The really long chains can get just a little waxy feeling to the smell. Ethyl octanoate may have the tiniest nuance of creamy apricot the smell.

All of these are probably not something you want to use unless you are specifically aiming for fruity or alcoholic brandy-like.

Not that this is expected to be very accurate, but if you look at the table of esters, it shows a pineapple for ethyl hexanoate, an apricot and brandy for ethyl heptanoate, and a red apple for ethyl octanoate. (Though this is not going to be a complete explanation of the differences in their smells, and keep in mind these tables are trying to stress the differences that exist between them, even though two different things may otherwise smell very smiliar)
 
May 23, 2020
Keep in mind there are two different type of "pineapple" notes. One is the simple and plain diffuse pineapple of a simple ester, pretty much just kind of fruity and vague, the general feel of pineapple without really any of the definition. Sort of like how there are other simple fruity esters that remind of other fruits. Then there is the texture of pineapple. The ACs in the family which includes Pharaone, Galbascone, etc, have both.
You may likely already know all this.

I have not smelled them, but the general trend is as the chain gets longer (hexanoate to heptanoate, for example), it becomes a little less fruity, often more muddled and subdued green. Probably still overall very similar in feel, but just the overall smell pushed a little bit more towards a certain different direction. The really long chains can get just a little waxy feeling to the smell. Ethyl octanoate may have the tiniest nuance of creamy apricot the smell.

All of these are probably not something you want to use unless you are specifically aiming for fruity or alcoholic brandy-like.

Not that this is expected to be very accurate, but if you look at the table of esters, it shows a pineapple for ethyl hexanoate, an apricot and brandy for ethyl heptanoate, and a red apple for ethyl octanoate. (Though this is not going to be a complete explanation of the differences in their smells, and keep in mind these tables are trying to stress the differences that exist between them, even though two different things may otherwise smell very smiliar)
Thanks Parker,
Interesting from the chemistry side! Which tables are you referring to?
 

pkiler

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Dec 5, 2007
Of what you ask about, I use Ethyl Caproate at 15% in my Perfect Pineapple base sold at PSH..
 

Flavorsthenfrags

Basenotes Member
May 18, 2020
Ethyl caproate is lighter and fruitier than ethyl caprylate, while caprylate is heavier, slightly winey, and starts to lean a little bit waxy.

Ethyl capronate falls in between: slightly green, heavier than caproate, but not quite as winey as caprylate. I'd consider this one redundant if you're using the other two.
 

David Ruskin

Basenotes Institution
May 28, 2009
Allyl esters are useful for Pineapple. Allyl amyl glycolate, allyl phenoxy acetate, allyl heptanoate should all be considered. There is also a sharp acidic quality I smell in Pineapple; possibly some Sinocitril or Citrathal.
 

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