Ensar oud crime & punishment

stinkyriddle

Well-known member
Jan 6, 2020
This is the part I don't understand. I feel this is all a part of his marketing. The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) was the epitome of humility and treating people with respect. Ensar has not been humble in his marketing or conversations on the forums. I don't find anything spiritual or Islamic in his rants. This isn't just about Crime and Punishment. This is about the past 11 years of observing his behaviors. Not just me, but many others who have been turned off by these behaviors.

I don’t place a box around anyone for how I wish their behavior to be. Just like you, I too have an opinion and while it’s different than others on here it won’t change how I feel about his products or the team he works with. We’re all human and we’re all fallible regardless of marketing tactics. I don’t understand the need to change someone’s mind to stop supporting an artisan because they behave differently then what we’d like them to. I’d support any artist that moves my soul to turn inwards regardless of how the public sees them. Also his apology seemed heartfelt and it’s not like anyone’s posted that so at least he has enough humility to admit when he’s wrong.
 
Last edited:
Feb 13, 2020
I don’t place a box around anyone for how I wish their behavior to be. Just like you, I too have an opinion and while it’s different than others on here it won’t change how I feel about his products or the team he works with. We’re all human and we’re all fallible regardless of marketing tactics. I don’t understand the need to change someone’s mind to stop supporting an artisan because they behave differently then what we’d like them to. I’d support any artist that moves my soul to turn inwards regardless of how the public sees them. Also his apology seemed heartfelt and it’s not like anyone’s posted that so at least he has enough humility to admit when he’s wrong.

Where did he post an apology?
 

911LambMelb

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Jan 3, 2019
Really appreciate the great write up. Now as far as the trust goes he will have to win it. He certainly trusted me with Kyara Ltd 2.0 for my feedback. We have known each other for long and I have always had utmost respect for his artistry. I don't let my judgement of people get in my way of judging their work.

Now as far as the present situation goes I had a talk with Ensar because I was furious. He said he was manipulated into thinking that I wasn't supporting him by other people who did not see many reviews of his recent products. So he automatically assumed there was some issue I had with him.

The second issue is he wrongly interpreted my post of E02 on my Instagram page which was written more than a year ago if I remember correctly. He thought I was bashing his product.

All the above factors plus my absence from Social Media somehow led him to believe I am working against him which is quite idiotic to say the least.

Before his invalid banter he could have simply called me, messaged me before. We used to chat a lot. A lot has happened with him and his associates which I was never a part of.

So to win the trust of the people he should first stop assuming things about people. He must consult his own conscience before he trusts third parties bases on a few assumptions. It s what is expected of a well read man with a burning passion inside.

We have talked and he realised it was a big misunderstanding. I understood my perspective in the post. We have had difference of opinion in the past which has never led us to part ways or whatever. Also, I keep my relationship with Artisans on a personal level. Its never a business type association. But I am of a reserved character and as aggressive in opinion as Ensar himself is.

Issues keep on happening. I am glad we have sorted it out. Some folks have churning out journalistic opinions on this rant which is thw most unwelcome and hilarious thing about it.

I wish Ensar the best for his future releases and I also urge fellow basenoters to use their judgement wisely. We all differ in opinion and sometimes it gets out of hand. But ultimately we are all on the same platform with a similar passion for perfumes.

These controversies are ugly and should be avoided to nurture future perfume lovers. One can always go back to my video review of EO2 and see the obvious. There was no bashing. Nothing offensive was said. No one was provocated.

Enough of time wasting on acts of nothingness. Good Day/Night folks. Let us walk towards the light hand in hand. Cheers. Best wishes to one and all.

Hi Nikhil,

Firstly, great work on your channel. I really enjoy your reviews. Keep it up!

Secondly, I can see how saying you curse someone can be taken out of context. But I do agree such things should be resolved behind closed doors. Especially since you've posted mostly glowing reviews of EO attars, oils and EO1.

So it shouldn't have come to this but glad things are sorted.

Wishing you and Ensar all the best moving forward.

Ohhh....you should review Crime and Punishment. I'm not joking. Epic video material right there.

Cheers.
 

Mak-7

Well-known member
Sep 19, 2019
I don’t place a box around anyone for how I wish their behavior to be. Just like you, I too have an opinion and while it’s different than others on here it won’t change how I feel about his products or the team he works with. We’re all human and we’re all fallible regardless of marketing tactics. I don’t understand the need to change someone’s mind to stop supporting an artisan because they behave differently then what we’d like them to. I’d support any artist that moves my soul to turn inwards regardless of how the public sees them. Also his apology seemed heartfelt and it’s not like anyone’s posted that so at least he has enough humility to admit when he’s wrong.

I think that anyone who is famous has to watch it. These are the people to whom we look up to. He is not a little boy, he is not uneducated, he is not Maugli who doesnt know how to behave in society. He is educated man, he is "creator", and he has Islam as a pillar that supports him with the laws to live by. Passion can be expressed in different way even with us being "just humans".
Whether anyone will stop supporting him or not, thats personal decision everyone has to make themselves, based only on their own heart and mind. This thread though has shown that Ensar took a step in wrong direction, and when it is my first time seeing him do this, looks like its not uncommon for him and he doesnt learn. Adam doesnt need strategies like this (if it is a strategy in the first place) he is a man of action.
 

slpfrsly

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 1, 2019
I was under the impression from listening to the talks of Ensars on his YouTube channel along with spiritual figures he interviews that there was traditions of using natural ingredients, no alcohol, along with certain recipes that were in line with the spirituality they practice and follow along with using perfumery as an act of spirituality when announcing oneself to Allah during certain prayer days. I’m not Muslim so from my interpretation of this it seemed that Islam has perfumery as a tool to connect with God.


I think you've nailed the source of the self righteousness. It's not a bad thing, it makes it interesting as a casual observer, but anyone who marries their ego (self ordained snob and/or perfectionist) to a transcendental level of importance is likely to allow the oud to get to their head...

Ultimately, who really cares? It's a mistake to take all of this too seriously or see youtubers - in any form - as reliable online friends when their entertainment or information comes at the cost of constant and subtle marketing.

If the fragrances don't stack up - if the end product is simply not as well liked a x,y, or z - then there is very little that can truly change that. All the bells and whistles of marketing haven't saved Jeremy Fragrance, for instance, from ultimately being hammered for an ok but overpriced pseudo-own-brand-release. If Ensar has found that competitors selling oud fragrances for 1/3 of the price that he does, and that they use synthetics along with real oud, and again that people prefer them - then nothing else matters. The back story, the 'art' of the craft, the religious belief. Some Arab kings and princes might enjoy the spiritual purpose and the personal side of things and maybe, if he wants the validation, this is the route to take, rather than trying to offer artisanal perfumes and oils to the masses (at least, that appears to be part of his reasoning) and then berating them as if they're swine before pearls.

I'm interesting in the perfume and the oils. That's it.
 

PEARL

Well-known member
Jun 30, 2011
I was under the impression from listening to the talks of Ensars on his YouTube channel along with spiritual figures he interviews that there was traditions of using natural ingredients, no alcohol, along with certain recipes that were in line with the spirituality they practice and follow along with using perfumery as an act of spirituality when announcing oneself to Allah during certain prayer days. I’m not Muslim so from my interpretation of this it seemed that Islam has perfumery as a tool to connect with God.
I can understand why you've made this interpretation and it's because those who practice the uncouth habit of mentioning they are Muslim, or talking about Islam, Sunnah, and the Hadith of the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم (peace and blessings be upon him) in their mercantile endeavors to sell agarwood and agarwood related product don't correct that assumption or interpretation. There is also a distinction between Arabic culture and the religion of Islam. In Arabic cultural history there are prominent figures such as Jabbir Ibn Hayyan and Al-Kindi who were Muslims that had interest in perfume, furthered innovation in fragrant material distillation, and made recipes, yet in the religion of Islam it is not obligatory for a Muslim to use such products.

Concerning spirituality and Muslims using perfume as a tool to connect with Allah, nope. I've seen some write that in their spiritual pursuits such as meditation, yoga, etc. that they use perfumes or oils to help ground or connect them somehow; not so in Islam and the uncouth don't correct that notion when it concerns Islam. In Islam it's your behavior, remembrance of Allah, and most importantly prayer that brings closeness to Allah and a way of communicating and purifying the heart, and anything from concentrating on the rumbling of your hungry belly, the design on your clothing, or the smell of perfume that distracts from remembrance of Allah or prayer is forbidden.

Concerning alcohol in perfume for Muslims, there is Islamic law Sharia and then there is Islamic jurisprudence, which is simply the interpretation when the law is not specific to a circumstance. It is forbidden to use alcohol as an intoxicant, however the leading schools of Islamic jurisprudence say it's A-OK for a Muslim to wear perfumes that contain alcohol. Concerning synthetics in perfume and Islam, I've not heard or read anything about that and the large Arabic companies such as Arabian Oud and Abdul Samad Al-Qurashi's catalogs are dominated by CPOs and spray perfumes that use synthetics and denatured alcohol rather than pure essential oils, extracts, concretes, etc.

The philosophy of the superiority of naturals versus synthetics is not universal and can be accepted or rejected, from an objective perspective the consumer user may not care and subjectively may prefer the composition that uses synthetics. The rant is hypocritical in that it seeks to find fault in another's marketing campaign, during it's own marketing campaign. Hypocritical because of being historically vocal in criticizing others under the facade of "art perpetuating art", but then behaving as if a review or opinion must be contrived when negative criticism is about them, or play the victim as if it was a personal affront or attack that makes the opinion invalid.
 

Sinkinggrade

Well-known member
Jun 5, 2019
I can understand why you've made this interpretation and it's because those who practice the uncouth habit of mentioning they are Muslim, or talking about Islam, Sunnah, and the Hadith of the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم (peace and blessings be upon him) in their mercantile endeavors to sell agarwood and agarwood related product don't correct that assumption or interpretation. There is also a distinction between Arabic culture and the religion of Islam. In Arabic cultural history there are prominent figures such as Jabbir Ibn Hayyan and Al-Kindi who were Muslims that had interest in perfume, furthered innovation in fragrant material distillation, and made recipes, yet in the religion of Islam it is not obligatory for a Muslim to use such products.

Concerning spirituality and Muslims using perfume as a tool to connect with Allah, nope. I've seen some write that in their spiritual pursuits such as meditation, yoga, etc. that they use perfumes or oils to help ground or connect them somehow; not so in Islam and the uncouth don't correct that notion when it concerns Islam. In Islam it's your behavior, remembrance of Allah, and most importantly prayer that brings closeness to Allah and a way of communicating and purifying the heart, and anything from concentrating on the rumbling of your hungry belly, the design on your clothing, or the smell of perfume that distracts from remembrance of Allah or prayer is forbidden.

Concerning alcohol in perfume for Muslims, there is Islamic law Sharia and then there is Islamic jurisprudence, which is simply the interpretation when the law is not specific to a circumstance. It is forbidden to use alcohol as an intoxicant, however the leading schools of Islamic jurisprudence say it's A-OK for a Muslim to wear perfumes that contain alcohol. Concerning synthetics in perfume and Islam, I've not heard or read anything about that and the large Arabic companies such as Arabian Oud and Abdul Samad Al-Qurashi's catalogs are dominated by CPOs and spray perfumes that use synthetics and denatured alcohol rather than pure essential oils, extracts, concretes, etc.

The philosophy of the superiority of naturals versus synthetics is not universal and can be accepted or rejected, from an objective perspective the consumer user may not care and subjectively may prefer the composition that uses synthetics. The rant is hypocritical in that it seeks to find fault in another's marketing campaign, during it's own marketing campaign. Hypocritical because of being historically vocal in criticizing others under the facade of "art perpetuating art", but then behaving as if a review or opinion must be contrived when negative criticism is about them, or play the victim as if it was a personal affront or attack that makes the opinion invalid.

Very interesting and informative post.
 

Diamondflame

Frag Bomber 1st Squadron
Basenotes Plus
Jun 28, 2009
I can understand why you've made this interpretation and it's because those who practice the uncouth habit of mentioning they are Muslim, or talking about Islam, Sunnah, and the Hadith of the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم (peace and blessings be upon him) in their mercantile endeavors to sell agarwood and agarwood related product don't correct that assumption or interpretation. There is also a distinction between Arabic culture and the religion of Islam. In Arabic cultural history there are prominent figures such as Jabbir Ibn Hayyan and Al-Kindi who were Muslims that had interest in perfume, furthered innovation in fragrant material distillation, and made recipes, yet in the religion of Islam it is not obligatory for a Muslim to use such products.

Concerning spirituality and Muslims using perfume as a tool to connect with Allah, nope. I've seen some write that in their spiritual pursuits such as meditation, yoga, etc. that they use perfumes or oils to help ground or connect them somehow; not so in Islam and the uncouth don't correct that notion when it concerns Islam. In Islam it's your behavior, remembrance of Allah, and most importantly prayer that brings closeness to Allah and a way of communicating and purifying the heart, and anything from concentrating on the rumbling of your hungry belly, the design on your clothing, or the smell of perfume that distracts from remembrance of Allah or prayer is forbidden.

Concerning alcohol in perfume for Muslims, there is Islamic law Sharia and then there is Islamic jurisprudence, which is simply the interpretation when the law is not specific to a circumstance. It is forbidden to use alcohol as an intoxicant, however the leading schools of Islamic jurisprudence say it's A-OK for a Muslim to wear perfumes that contain alcohol. Concerning synthetics in perfume and Islam, I've not heard or read anything about that and the large Arabic companies such as Arabian Oud and Abdul Samad Al-Qurashi's catalogs are dominated by CPOs and spray perfumes that use synthetics and denatured alcohol rather than pure essential oils, extracts, concretes, etc.

The philosophy of the superiority of naturals versus synthetics is not universal and can be accepted or rejected, from an objective perspective the consumer user may not care and subjectively may prefer the composition that uses synthetics. The rant is hypocritical in that it seeks to find fault in another's marketing campaign, during it's own marketing campaign. Hypocritical because of being historically vocal in criticizing others under the facade of "art perpetuating art", but then behaving as if a review or opinion must be contrived when negative criticism is about them, or play the victim as if it was a personal affront or attack that makes the opinion invalid.

Thank you for taking the time to post this. Well articulated! Especially concerning the widespread confusion between Arabian culture and Islamic practices, even among Muslims. Often in their zeal, believers inadvertently go down the puritanical path and chastise/condemn anyone else whom they perceive to be taking certain liberties...
 

oudaddict

Well-known member
Feb 2, 2017
I really don't understand when perfumers get upset if their work is criticised, I'm even more baffled as to why a reviewer would be cautious about hurting the feelings of the perfumer by saying something negative about their work. Any artist or manufacturer that creates a product should realise that not everyone will like it and should expect a certain amount of criticism. It just highlights to me how inflated some of their egos are that they expect everyone to love and say positive things about everything they create. Welcome to the real world.
 

oudaddict

Well-known member
Feb 2, 2017
BTW, the distillation of alcohol as a pure compound was discovered by Muslim scientists such as Al-Kindi and Abu Bakr al-Razi in the 8th and 9th centuries CE. The word ‘alcohol’ even comes from the Arabic word ‘Al-Kuhl’ or more likely ‘Al-Ghawl’.
 

Abdulrahil777

Member
Jan 25, 2020
I noticed his Crime & Punishment just today. The naming was a surprise (based on his usual names). Anyway, NOT to speak badly of him at all but as a customer of his who owns Oud Yusuf and Aroha Kush (as well as two of his perfume oils), the question has popped into my mind if he 'spikes' his oud with aroma chemicals. Again, NOT to accuse him at all but my nose tells me the fruit notes seem a little too tenacious and a little too 'true'. I want to try more oud's from him but I'm feeling apprehensive to buy from him again because of my uncertainty about his oud. I don't know who 'Adam' and JK are but I'm looking for other oud dealers just to see what else is out there. I feel bad writing in this public forum my questions about the purity of his oud because he seems like such an awesome guy in his YT videos and on the youtube channel called FragranceView etc... but I want to see if anyone else has the same questions. Don't get me wrong he seems like the type of person I'd love to know personally; no disrespect intended for him by my above concerns.

same thoughts totally
 

naylor

Well-known member
Oct 24, 2011
I really don't understand when perfumers get upset if their work is criticised, I'm even more baffled as to why a reviewer would be cautious about hurting the feelings of the perfumer by saying something negative about their work. Any artist or manufacturer that creates a product should realise that not everyone will like it and should expect a certain amount of criticism. It just highlights to me how inflated some of their egos are that they expect everyone to love and say positive things about everything they create. Welcome to the real world.
I didn't really interpret Ensar's write-up to mean that he couldn't take criticism ... but that in this case, he was convinced that the criticism had the ulterior motive of downplaying his fragrance in order to promote the sale of the reviewer's own collaboration fragrance. I think that was his point, not that it simply upset him that somebody didn't like his perfume.

But in any case, Ensar's write-up certainly got a lot of people talking about this release, for better or for worse ... so I think the marketing did its intended job.
 

exoticscents

Well-known member
Sep 10, 2016
So Areej Le Dore needs collaborations to sell ? In that case the 101 page discussion on the ALD on Basenotes must be a MASS CONSPIRACY against Ensar and the likes. Lol.
 

Diamondflame

Frag Bomber 1st Squadron
Basenotes Plus
Jun 28, 2009
So Areej Le Dore needs collaborations to sell ? In that case the 101 page discussion on the ALD on Basenotes must be a MASS CONSPIRACY against Ensar and the likes. Lol.

You’ve been away from BN for too long, buddy. It’s 176 pages and counting... Watch out for the spike when ALD attars ‘drop’ next month! :smiley:
 

U2u

Well-known member
Jul 26, 2014
I didn't really interpret Ensar's write-up to mean that he couldn't take criticism ... but that in this case, he was convinced that the criticism had the ulterior motive of downplaying his fragrance in order to promote the sale of the reviewer's own collaboration fragrance. I think that was his point, not that it simply upset him that somebody didn't like his perfume.

But in any case, Ensar's write-up certainly got a lot of people talking about this release, for better or for worse ... so I think the marketing did its intended job.

The intended job ought to be getting people to talk about the fragrances - for the better with criticism of the products as appropriate. I think he missed, the focus has come far away from his scents to secondary issues. While there has been much good discussion in this thread it is not the type he needs to seek. Many of us have limited resources and may choose to direct those resources to artisans who are more likeable for lack of a better term. No problem dropping coin for ALD, no problem for the Bortnikoffs that meet my needs. I would like Crime and Punishment but the brand is tarnished so I am struggling with the decision to buy. My guess is I am not alone with such issues. Get rid of his side issues and sales come more easily.
 

stinkyriddle

Well-known member
Jan 6, 2020
I can understand why you've made this interpretation and it's because those who practice the uncouth habit of mentioning they are Muslim, or talking about Islam, Sunnah, and the Hadith of the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم (peace and blessings be upon him) in their mercantile endeavors to sell agarwood and agarwood related product don't correct that assumption or interpretation. There is also a distinction between Arabic culture and the religion of Islam. In Arabic cultural history there are prominent figures such as Jabbir Ibn Hayyan and Al-Kindi who were Muslims that had interest in perfume, furthered innovation in fragrant material distillation, and made recipes, yet in the religion of Islam it is not obligatory for a Muslim to use such products.

Concerning spirituality and Muslims using perfume as a tool to connect with Allah, nope. I've seen some write that in their spiritual pursuits such as meditation, yoga, etc. that they use perfumes or oils to help ground or connect them somehow; not so in Islam and the uncouth don't correct that notion when it concerns Islam. In Islam it's your behavior, remembrance of Allah, and most importantly prayer that brings closeness to Allah and a way of communicating and purifying the heart, and anything from concentrating on the rumbling of your hungry belly, the design on your clothing, or the smell of perfume that distracts from remembrance of Allah or prayer is forbidden.

Concerning alcohol in perfume for Muslims, there is Islamic law Sharia and then there is Islamic jurisprudence, which is simply the interpretation when the law is not specific to a circumstance. It is forbidden to use alcohol as an intoxicant, however the leading schools of Islamic jurisprudence say it's A-OK for a Muslim to wear perfumes that contain alcohol. Concerning synthetics in perfume and Islam, I've not heard or read anything about that and the large Arabic companies such as Arabian Oud and Abdul Samad Al-Qurashi's catalogs are dominated by CPOs and spray perfumes that use synthetics and denatured alcohol rather than pure essential oils, extracts, concretes, etc.

The philosophy of the superiority of naturals versus synthetics is not universal and can be accepted or rejected, from an objective perspective the consumer user may not care and subjectively may prefer the composition that uses synthetics. The rant is hypocritical in that it seeks to find fault in another's marketing campaign, during it's own marketing campaign. Hypocritical because of being historically vocal in criticizing others under the facade of "art perpetuating art", but then behaving as if a review or opinion must be contrived when negative criticism is about them, or play the victim as if it was a personal affront or attack that makes the opinion invalid.

Thank you for writing this! Beautifully said and I appreciate you taking the time to help inform a stranger such as myself to become more culturally conscious.
 

stinkyriddle

Well-known member
Jan 6, 2020
I didn't really interpret Ensar's write-up to mean that he couldn't take criticism ... but that in this case, he was convinced that the criticism had the ulterior motive of downplaying his fragrance in order to promote the sale of the reviewer's own collaboration fragrance. I think that was his point, not that it simply upset him that somebody didn't like his perfume.

But in any case, Ensar's write-up certainly got a lot of people talking about this release, for better or for worse ... so I think the marketing did its intended job.

I agree as well. I never got and do not have the impression that he can’t handle criticism. After re-reading his post it really doesn’t seem to be the monstrosity of arrogance, egoism, and whining thats being interpreted here on this thread. But I can see why all parties involved are passionate about who they support and why.
 

Sultan al Hindi

Well-known member
Feb 5, 2020
I can understand why you've made this interpretation and it's because those who practice the uncouth habit of mentioning they are Muslim, or talking about Islam, Sunnah, and the Hadith of the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم (peace and blessings be upon him) in their mercantile endeavors to sell agarwood and agarwood related product don't correct that assumption or interpretation.

I agree with everything else you have written but is it really 'uncouth' to mention a sunnah of the Prophet pbuh (in this case wearing perfume/musk) for both business purposes and also to make their customer aware of the added spiritual benefits (acting upon a Sunnah will for sure get you closer to God)?
 

FCM415

Well-known member
Jan 25, 2018
Seems like the only times religion is mentioned is "in passing"and as " matter of fact" during candid conversations and not as a marketing ploy in product descriptions. If the prophet and people in his time in fact enjoyed ambergris, musk, and oud, is it against religion to continue such tradition today? Can any religious scholars here pontificate on why or why not as long as it is in moderation? Would the prophet be upset about this if he were here today? Is the business of fragrances really that taboo?
 
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PEARL

Well-known member
Jun 30, 2011
I agree with everything else you have written but is it really 'uncouth' to mention a sunnah of the Prophet pbuh (in this case wearing perfume/musk) for both business purposes and also to make their customer aware of the added spiritual benefits (acting upon a Sunnah will for sure get you closer to God)?
I'd love to tell you why and give examples of the uncouth behavior/habit here but likely inappropriate, check your PM.

If the prophet and people in his time in fact enjoyed ambergris, musk, and oud, is it against religion to continue such tradition today?
No.
 

oudaddict

Well-known member
Feb 2, 2017
The "sunnah" is to smell nice, regardless of what is used, nothing to do with organic oud oil. In fact oud oil was not available in an oil format in the time of the Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) although he did use oud wood as incense. The problem arises when businessmen try to pull at the heart-strings of gullible Muslims by trying to suggest that it is a rewarding religiously to restrict yourself to using certain materials when it is simply not the case. We have Muslims selling "sunnah erectile dysfunction pills" and "miswak toothpaste" etc. which is, of course, all a load of nonsense.
 

Sinkinggrade

Well-known member
Jun 5, 2019
The "sunnah" is to smell nice, regardless of what is used, nothing to do with organic oud oil. In fact oud oil was not available in an oil format in the time of the Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) although he did use oud wood as incense. The problem arises when businessmen try to pull at the heart-strings of gullible Muslims by trying to suggest that it is a rewarding religiously to restrict yourself to using certain materials when it is simply not the case. We have Muslims selling "sunnah erectile dysfunction pills" and "miswak toothpaste" etc. which is, of course, all a load of nonsense.

Exactly.
 

PEARL

Well-known member
Jun 30, 2011
To further expound on what @oudaddict mentioned, the oud wood discussed and used from that time was said to be Qust al-Bahree (sea incense costus root said to be white) and Oud al-Hindi or Qust al-Hindi (Indian costus root said to be black). Costus root is in the costaceae family and costus genus. It is not agarwood, which is in the thymelaeaceae family and either aquilaria or gyrinops genus.
 

oudaddict

Well-known member
Feb 2, 2017
To further expound on what @oudaddict mentioned, the oud wood discussed and used from that time was said to be Qust al-Bahree (sea incense costus root said to be white) and Oud al-Hindi or Qust al-Hindi (Indian costus root said to be black). Costus root is in the costaceae family and costus genus. It is not agarwood, which is in the thymelaeaceae family and either aquilaria or gyrinops genus.

No, this is not what I was referring. You are correct that costus is mentioned, named "al-oud al-hindi" in Arabic, but the traditional word for agarwood in Arabic is "Uluwwah" and this has been mentioned in other narrations such as:

Nafi reported that when Ibn Umar wanted fumigation he got it from aloeswood (oud) without mixing anything with it, or he put camphor along with aloeswood and then said: This is how Allah’s Messenger ﷺ fumigated.

(Sahih Muslim, Book 27, No. 5601)
 

solvovir

Well-known member
Aug 22, 2019
Official note breakdown.....4 pages later.

Top Notes:

Orange Blossom

Ginger leaf

Coriander

Petitgrain



Heart notes:

Ylang Ylang

Mimosa

Jasmine

Coffee

Templin

Pepper

Blue Cypress

Edward Rose

Raspberry

Blue lotus



Base notes:

Frankincense

Aged Mysore Sandalwood

Vintage Sumatran Oud

Cambodian Oud

Sri Lankan Oud

Trio of Hindi Ouds: Garo Hills, North Cachar and Manipur



Fixatives and carriers:

Siberian Musk

Tanzanian Osyris

Beach-Combed Jamaican Ambergris
 

FCM415

Well-known member
Jan 25, 2018
No takers?

I thought we were going to make holy interpretations on how the almighty will punish his servant for running an evil business. As his servant, Ensar will be judged by the all merciful and no one else. But I am curious about his offenses that offend some of you. Sure hes not as humble as some Saudis driving multiple Ferraris. Certainly isnt as tolerant of other human beings as most in the faith. You guys want to talk religion because he brought up Islamic traditions in a few posts and coversations? How should he be punished? Perhaps Nikhil, the nonbeliever who he misunderstood can provide punishment via oudding. Like a stoning but not fatal, just until he learned his lesson. It should make you feel better for Ensar’s shortcomings in pridefully making fragrance a life’s work which in some ways goes back to the messenger (Allah bless him).
 

Diamondflame

Frag Bomber 1st Squadron
Basenotes Plus
Jun 28, 2009
No takers?

I thought we were going to make holy interpretations on how the almighty will punish his servant for running an evil business. As his servant, Ensar will be judged by the all merciful and no one else. But I am curious about his offenses that offend some of you. Sure hes not as humble as some Saudis driving multiple Ferraris. Certainly isnt as tolerant of other human beings as most in the faith. You guys want to talk religion because he brought up Islamic traditions in a few posts and coversations? How should he be punished? Perhaps Nikhil, the nonbeliever who he misunderstood can provide punishment via oudding. Like a stoning but not fatal, just until he learned his lesson. It should make you feel better for Ensar’s shortcomings in pridefully making fragrance a life’s work which in some ways goes back to the messenger (Allah bless him).

Enough with the shit-stirring. Let’s move on & keep the conversation on the fragrance, shall we?
 

pluran

Well-known member
Mar 2, 2006
Compared to Ensar Oud, Russian Adam is Jacques Guerlain.

Hopefully the new one is better, but Tigerlust is a genuine pile of crap.
 

FCM415

Well-known member
Jan 25, 2018
Enough with the shit-stirring. Let’s move on & keep the conversation on the fragrance, shall we?

That’s a great idea. Since Im the only one stirring shit one way, it would be nice to see all the shit stirring the other way stop and focus on the fragrances... good or bad of course.
 

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