Eau d'Hermes (Only Fans)

Sinkinggrade

Super Member
Jun 5, 2019
How many sprays of EdH do you all use? I'm generally an undersprayer with most scents (typically 2-3 sprays under my shirt for most EDTs, plus a half spritz on my arm). Perhaps true to its lineage, this stuff seems to wear more like an EDC, so I've been going with 5 sprays. It's still a skin scent within a couple hours, though the base seems to hang around for a while. Just curious how heavily you all tend to apply.
Eau d'Hermès has always been intense and long lasting (not saying good performer) on me. During summer, no more 2-3 on the neck. Sometimes one spray under the chin does it. With all its iterations, from Pewter Tops to Black Caps.
 

Cook.bot

Flâneuse
Basenotes Plus
Jan 6, 2012
Perhaps true to its lineage, this stuff seems to wear more like an EDC,

It really is an EDC in all but name.

3-5 sprays to my chest

About the same quantity for me, but on arms and back of neck. That'll last about 3 hours on me, but hang on as a skin scent for a couple hours more. Sometimes I spray my shirt fabric to get a little more life out of it.
 

mikeperez23

Be Here. Now.
Basenotes Plus
Dec 31, 2006
How many sprays of EdH do you all use? I'm generally an undersprayer with most scents (typically 2-3 sprays under my shirt for most EDTs, plus a half spritz on my arm). Perhaps true to its lineage, this stuff seems to wear more like an EDC, so I've been going with 5 sprays. It's still a skin scent within a couple hours, though the base seems to hang around for a while. Just curious how heavily you all tend to apply.
I always oversprayed it. 8-10 sprays
 

TheJunkman

Basenotes Member
Aug 11, 2020
Alright guys, I am very confused. I am not always the best at explaining stories, but I'll give it a go. I got my 200ml bottle of the pewter cap version today. The cap undoubtedly looks like pewter, which made me realize that the bottle I already had that I thought was the pewter cap, is most definitely not the pewter cap. Since I got it (the bottle that I thought was the pewter cap) I thought it was odd that the cap was, well, black. I knew that the new bottles of EdH have black caps, but I thought it to be the pewter cap version since it was sealed, in a vintage style box, with the vintage style label, and had a batch code of JF1H. This batch code, according to Raiders of the Lost Scent, means that it's a 1987 bottle. Did Hermes use black caps for EdH prior to the new version? Here is a picture of the two bottles, and the box for the supposedly 1987 black cap. I do not have the box for the pewter cap. Also I will add that my pewter cap bottles batch code is XM1B0, which points to 1999. 20220922_210742.jpg
 

saminlondon

Basenotes Dependent
Aug 25, 2011
Alright guys, I am very confused. I am not always the best at explaining stories, but I'll give it a go. I got my 200ml bottle of the pewter cap version today. The cap undoubtedly looks like pewter, which made me realize that the bottle I already had that I thought was the pewter cap, is most definitely not the pewter cap. Since I got it (the bottle that I thought was the pewter cap) I thought it was odd that the cap was, well, black. I knew that the new bottles of EdH have black caps, but I thought it to be the pewter cap version since it was sealed, in a vintage style box, with the vintage style label, and had a batch code of JF1H. This batch code, according to Raiders of the Lost Scent, means that it's a 1987 bottle. Did Hermes use black caps for EdH prior to the new version? Here is a picture of the two bottles, and the box for the supposedly 1987 black cap. I do not have the box for the pewter cap. Also I will add that my pewter cap bottles batch code is XM1B0, which points to 1999. View attachment 294543
I have a bottle from the same period with a cap that looks almost completely black, so I wouldn't worry about it. The bottle on the right looks properly vintage and exactly as it should. It's hard to see from the photo, but is it slightly flecked with silver?

As far as I am aware the recent bottles that use the black cap come only as atomisers, so it's highly unlikely anyone would have reused one on a screw-top bottle.
 

TheJunkman

Basenotes Member
Aug 11, 2020
I have a bottle from the same period with a cap that looks almost completely black, so I wouldn't worry about it. The bottle on the right looks properly vintage and exactly as it should. It's hard to see from the photo, but is it slightly flecked with silver?

As far as I am aware the recent bottles that use the black cap come only as atomisers, so it's highly unlikely anyone would have reused one on a screw-top bottle.
The pewter cap is more grey than it looks in the picture. It is also a coating on the cap rather than the actual color of the cap, the textured grey can be scratched off to reveal smooth black beneath.
 

Starblind

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Oct 2, 2013
The pewter cap is more grey than it looks in the picture. It is also a coating on the cap rather than the actual color of the cap, the textured grey can be scratched off to reveal smooth black beneath.
Interesting!

How do they smell, compared to each other? Any differences?
Yeah, I'd like to know this, too (since I was the seller of the pewter top bottle). :)
 

Andy the frenchy

Basenotes Dependent
Sep 16, 2018
I own a 2002 refill bottle (copper top period), a 2011 bottle (transparent top) and a 2018 bottle (black top).

I cannot spot any major difference between these 3. If anything, the 2002 seems a bit rounder, but more than a reform, I'd put that on the expected little degradation of the citric top notes, that have a weaker ability to balance the leather, and thus have the leather appear as 'rounder'.
Pretty sure that my 2018 bottle (as of today) is closer to what Roundnitska wanted me to smell than my 2002 bottle is (as of today). But again, quite sure anyone would fail the blind test on these 3 bottles given how small the differences are. Glad I paid around $80-100 for each of these bottles, as a price difference would not be justified in this case, imo.
 

Toxicon

Basenotes Dependent
May 29, 2021
Based on recent discussions in other threads, I’m curious where we think the “funk” in Eau d’Hermes originates. Originally I thought it was the cumin, or maybe the jasmine, but now I’m starting to wonder if it’s civetone (or something else) producing the earthy, almost fecal funk that I detect.

For context, I rarely have a problem with cumin notes in other scents; I love things like Declaration and LADDM, and I can’t even smell the cumin note that bothers others in Fleurs d’Oranger. Similarly, I thought it might be an indolic jasmine at play - I get a similar (but much lighter) whiff of “funk” from Roudnitska’s Eau Sauvage, which I always attributed to a “dirty jasmine.” But I’m starting to question that too - Ive been experimenting with jasmine soliflores (including “raunchy” ones like Norma Kameli’s Jazmin) and have no issue.

I guess I’m just curious where you all think the funk originates in EdH? It would be interesting if it comes from all of these notes (cumin, jasmine, civetone, etc), but each of us is only sensitive to particular “flavors of funk”. What do you all think?
 

Cook.bot

Flâneuse
Basenotes Plus
Jan 6, 2012
I think in the pre-coppertop incarnations, it was mostly down to the civet/civetone. There might be civetone in the coppertop as well (which I'm wearing today), but to me that edition smells powerfully of cumin. I don't really smell jasmine in any part of it.

And for the record, none of the versions of EdH that I've smelled struck me as fecal in any way.
 

GoldWineMemories

Basenotes Dependent
Nov 22, 2019
I was reading through old interviews and found this curious response by Ellena:

What are your views on reformulation and IFRA and anti-allergen issues?



JCE: For me, the oldest perfumes are not old. They are still selling. And because they are still selling, they are not old. There are people who love these perfumes today. I’ll give you an example. Calèche was done in ’61, Eau D’Hermès was done in ’51, they are still used by people today. I have respect for these perfumes as they are. In fact, since I’ve been with Hermès, we’ve never changed these perfumes. They’re still like they were in the past. But these perfumes were made at a very low concentration, so in fact, there are no IFRA problems*. So we can respect them. If in future, because of IFRA, we have to change, then we will do it. We would have to follow the legislation. But with a lot of respect. I would be ready to work for one year or two years on this. For me, the great idea in Hermès is that what you find now at the age of 20, you will still find the same thing at the age of 60. You change, but not the perfume.

from persolaise.com

This was from July, 2012. Ellena claims that Eau d'Hermes is like it was in the past. Ellena retired I believe in 2016 or 2017 from Hermes.
 

cheapimitation

Basenotes Dependent
May 15, 2015
I was reading through old interviews and found this curious response by Ellena:

What are your views on reformulation and IFRA and anti-allergen issues?



JCE: For me, the oldest perfumes are not old. They are still selling. And because they are still selling, they are not old. There are people who love these perfumes today. I’ll give you an example. Calèche was done in ’61, Eau D’Hermès was done in ’51, they are still used by people today. I have respect for these perfumes as they are. In fact, since I’ve been with Hermès, we’ve never changed these perfumes. They’re still like they were in the past. But these perfumes were made at a very low concentration, so in fact, there are no IFRA problems*. So we can respect them. If in future, because of IFRA, we have to change, then we will do it. We would have to follow the legislation. But with a lot of respect. I would be ready to work for one year or two years on this. For me, the great idea in Hermès is that what you find now at the age of 20, you will still find the same thing at the age of 60. You change, but not the perfume.

from persolaise.com

This was from July, 2012. Ellena claims that Eau d'Hermes is like it was in the past. Ellena retired I believe in 2016 or 2017 from Hermes.

Wow that's interesting and makes sense since most older men's fragrances are Eau de Cologne. Another example of how IFRA probably isn't quite the evil boogeyman some make it out to be. Changes are more likely due to changes in sourcing and/or changes in current tastes, ie. real animalics aren't so acceptable now.

That last sentence makes me a bit sad now because it is something I massively respected about Hermes that is no longer true. They recently have discounted several Hermessence, and there was a time where I asked about rumored discontinuation at an Hermes counter and the SA replied "Hermes doesn't discontinue fragrances." I asked again recently and they said "yep that's gone, this one too, and this one, and this one..."

I'm sure the old classics will stay in production, but I hoped out of respect for Ellena's work they would keep the entire Hermessence line intact even if some are very unpopular. Ah well, being into perfume is to learn nothing is permanent.
 

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