Down or up the fragrance ladder question

stuigi

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Sep 3, 2004
As a fragrance goes from extrait to perfume to eau de parfum to edt to eau de cologne or up the scale., I have two questions: First for the perfumers- how do you decide which, if not all, of the notes do you dilute/increase or delete? For perfume enthusiasts- Do you notice more, if any, of a reduction of the strength of basenotes, middle or top notes, or a specific combination of these as you move down or up the scale of a specific fragrance's notes? This last question is obvioulsy best answered by those who have several strengths of the same fragrance.
 

hednic

Basenotes Institution
Oct 25, 2007
For perfume enthusiasts- Do you notice more, if any, of a reduction of the strength of basenotes, middle or top notes, or a specific combination of these as you move down or up the scale of a specific fragrance's notes? This last question is obviously best answered by those who have several strengths of the same fragrance.
Yes I notice a reduction of strength in all levels going down the scale. To cite my example:

Rouge 540 by Baccarat and Maison Francis Kurkdjian
Pure Concentrated Parfum in Baccarat Crystal > Extrait de Parfum > EDP > EDT and I have all four.
 

Bonnette

Missing Oakmoss
Basenotes Plus
Jul 25, 2015
I like to have at least three versions of favorite perfumes, and I'm able to tell the difference between those concentrations, but it's probably not possible to generalize about the "hydraulics" of fragrances as they move up/down the scale - they're all different, not only in terms of concentration, but years of production, available ingredients, and so on. I'll be very interested to hear what perfumers say on this subject. Great topic.
 

imm0rtelle

Basenotes Junkie
Apr 2, 2021
Do you notice more, if any, of a reduction of the strength of basenotes, middle or top notes, or a specific combination of these as you move down or up the scale of a specific fragrance's notes? This last question is obvioulsy best answered by those who have several strengths of the same fragrance.
I like to think of it as like variations of the same song. The parfum would be like the orchestra version. Eau de Parfums/Eeau de Toilets would be like the studio version. Eau de colognes would be like the acoustic/acapella version. It is the same song, but interpreted differently and gives a slightly different overall vibe.
 
Apr 8, 2021
The balance of notes, and therefore the overall character of the fragrance, can be quite different from one concentration to another. I, too, love to have ideally all available concentrations of my favourites, even though pure parfum/extrait tends to be the richest. Along the lines of Imm0rtelle above, they can be like variations on a theme.
 

Bonnette

Missing Oakmoss
Basenotes Plus
Jul 25, 2015
Still trying to find out if anyone notices whether top, middle or basenotes are amplified as one goes up the scale as opposed to all notes.
I think it depends on the perfume. The changes I detect are mainly middle notes, usually concerning the relative prominence of floral notes. But my most-worn perfumes are white florals, so my sample is skewed in that direction.
 

Bonnette

Missing Oakmoss
Basenotes Plus
Jul 25, 2015
The above video does touch upon the fact that increasing one note can alone boost the fragrance strength. So has anyone noticed one note substantially doing so in your personal experience with two or more concentrations of the same fragrance?
For me, that would be rose.
 

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