Dior Sauvage (EdT) vs Prada Luna Rossa Carbon - Same or Different?

Dior Sauvage Vs Prada Luna Rossa Carbon

  • They smell the same

    Votes: 3 17.6%
  • They smell different

    Votes: 14 82.4%

  • Total voters
    17

Varanis Ridari

The Scented Devil
Basenotes Plus
Oct 17, 2012
After living with both Dior Sauvage (eau de toilette) and Prada Luna Rossa Carbon for some time, I figured I'd circle back to address an early argument against the Prada scent: People find that Luna Rossa Carbon smells like a clone of Dior Sauvage. To be honest, when I first whiffed Prada Luna Rossa Carbon, I got nothing of the sort, but people also claim the original Luna Rossa smells like a clone of Bleu de Chanel, so I surmise that there's a general opinion of Prada trying to steal the thunder of popular masculine fragrances. Truth be told, the entire mainstream masculine fragrance market has always been an imitation game among those left behind by the big breakthroughs, so it's nothing new.

However, are Dior Sauvage and Prada Luna Rossa Carbon really that much alike? My answer is yes and no, so let me explain.

Dior Sauvage (2015): Arguably one of the most original fragrances of the 2010's on the mass-market side of things for men. Rather than going in a more even-keeled direction as Bleu de Chanel (2010), or sweeter path like Gucci Guilty pour Homme (2011) and Paco Rabanne Invictus (2013), François Demachy overdosed the ambroxan base note, sidled in a scratchy norlimbanol woods note, then covered it in smoothed-over vacuum-distiled bergamot borrowed from Creed Aventus (2010), filling in the gaps with vetiver, pink pepper, and a weird isolated lavender devoid of sweetness. This lavender is described by an early reviewer in 2015 as translated "through grayscale", removing all the purple color from the note, the roundness and richness gone. This lavender isn't medicinal like lavandin can be, just containing only the spikey colorless bits. It's not a perfect analogy but it works. The last part is important.

Prada Luna Rossa Carbon (2017): Daniela Andrier is a mainstay of Prada perfumes, although sometimes her work is too referential for her own good as it is here. She obviously was tasked to replicate the success of Sauvage here in the same way she was likely asked to replicate the success of Bleu de Chanel with the original Luna Rossa (2012), but here there are greater degrees of separation, and it comes down to the lavender. Luna Rossa Carbon takes some nods from a few luxury/niche fougères with their use of metallic aldehydes to impart a fresh-pressed suit scented with lavender, something those niche scents themselves borrowed from Chanel Platinum Égoïste (1993), but in Luna Rossa Carbon the metallic note mixes with the smooth "Sauvagey" bergamot. Andrier buids a futuristic mossless fougère accord (aka "nu-gère) inside of the Sauvage framework, removing pink pepper and dosing the "grayscale" lavender higher.

What does this mean?

if you want to skip all the olfactive breakdown nonsense, what I'm basically saying is Luna Rossa Carbon co-opts the "ambrox bomb" phenomenon taken to new heights with Dior Sauvage and injects some classic traditional French perfumery into it, turning what feels like a cold AI-created scent based purely on marketing data into merely a barbershop fougère with a cybernetic heart. Luna Rossa Carbon is what Fred Deckard in the Blade Runner universe wears after a shave, while Sauvage is what the Replicants spray on, thinking it will make them smell "more Human". I like them both, but I think Luna Rossa Carbon is better for people who have cognitive dissonance over obviously-abstract synthetic smells like Sauvage.

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Now what are your thoughts? Agree or disagree? Do you read any differences or do they feel identical to you? What are your impressions?
 
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FragFrog

Basenotes Dependent
Oct 6, 2018
Excellent post, thank you!

I always got that sort of "barbershop" vibe with Luna Rossa Carbon (because of the prominent Lavender, especially around 20 minutes after spraying it on) which never happened with Sauvage. Unfortunately this stage doesn't last that long on my skin and is gone 2 hours (max) which is a shame. Then I'm left with that metallic smell, which I found a little bit piercing and therefore annoying.

I know people who couldn't stand Sauvage because they can't tolerate the hugh amount of ambroxan (and maybe the pink pepper) but they do enjoy Luna Rossa Carbon.
So I would at least recommend to give Luna Rossa Carbon a try if Sauvage is a little bit too hefty for you.
 

blackaroma

Basenotes Junkie
Apr 16, 2020
I agree with your break down. Except I only like one of them, I find Sauvage very boring and unbalanced I even avoided Carbon as I thought it was similar to Sauvage. But when smelled side to side Sauvage seems like an Armaf clone of LRC. Carbon smells as if Comme des Garcons has made a barbershop! I like it. (unfortunately it also performs as an average CdG)
 

notspendingamillion

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Sep 2, 2018
I find the Sauvage hate bizzare. Scratchy, bombastic, and a bit simplistic. Many frags i dont care for, but the active vitreal many espouse would for me take quite a bit more than that. I dont find it unbalanced, though i do agree it is overdosed. Also, while buzzy and scratchy it doesnt have that wierd nauseating chemicals you get in a lot of downmarket brands and clones. It smells "good" on average to johnny public, and i totally get hating that safety, especially from a brand that has a history of taking chances. I could argue that they did, its a big statement of an overdose. But as for it being bland though, nobody haaates Gucci Guilty. Its boring, and just less than in most ways. All the cool kids hate Sauvage it seems.

Carbon is more of a lavendar barber robot thing to me. Sauvage a cynical cactus pepper bomb. They "feel" different to me.
 

blackaroma

Basenotes Junkie
Apr 16, 2020
I find the Sauvage hate bizzare. Scratchy, bombastic, and a bit simplistic. Many frags i dont care for, but the active vitreal many espouse would for me take quite a bit more than that. I dont find it unbalanced, though i do agree it is overdosed. Also, while buzzy and scratchy it doesnt have that wierd nauseating chemicals you get in a lot of downmarket brands and clones. It smells "good" on average to johnny public, and i totally get hating that safety, especially from a brand that has a history of taking chances. I could argue that they did, its a big statement of an overdose. But as for it being bland though, nobody haaates Gucci Guilty. Its boring, and just less than in most ways. All the cool kids hate Sauvage it seems.

Carbon is more of a lavendar barber robot thing to me. Sauvage a cynical cactus pepper bomb. They "feel" different to me.

It's hard to hate Sauvage, it doesn't have enough character to justify hate, it's simple, boring and loud, if I ever wanted to use hate and Sauvage in one sentence it'd be something like:
"I hate how Dior followed the last decades of Fahrenheit and Homme lines with an uninteresting line in Sauvage."

There's a difference, disappointment isn't hate, you can find Sauvage nice & good and still hate how Dior could have done more in the past decade.
 

Zgb

Basenotes Dependent
Jan 20, 2009
They share the same style, but not the character. I prefer Prada because all the teenage brats and all the grandpas too (you've read that right) wear Dior Sauvage. In the past 5 years you can't smell anything else in the streets. The scent itself became hyper hyped because of the youtubers, honestly. So most of 15 + crowd wears it because they think it'll get them laid and most of 50+ guys also wear it because THEY TOO think it'll get them laid. There, this was my cruel, honest, subjective opinion. That being said, Prada is more rounded, toned down and lavander prone without losing longevity and overall strength.
 

Slayerized

Basenotes Dependent
Jul 17, 2011
I own Capucci L'Homme ('Sauvage') Suave (2016) which is pretty similar to Sauvage in the drydown but less peppery and screaming (amber instead of ambroxan) but more clean. It smells luxurious and lasts all day. To me way better than Sauvage edt!
I do not think many here own this one.........anyone?
o.53178.jpg


Interesting fact is (info Fragrantica) that they had to change the name from 'Sauvage' to 'Suave'' because it was too similar in name (as well) to the Dior.
So now it looks like this:
roberto-capucci-l-homme-suave-apa-de-toaleta-pentru-barbati-100-ml-284300.jpg
 

Brooks Otterlake

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Feb 12, 2019
This style isn't my favorite, but I do prefer the Prada here (and, no, I don't think they're the same, even if they have a similar feeling). That cyborg fougere structure is more interesting than Sauvage's exercise in showergel abstraction.
 

Danny Mitchell

Basenotes Institution
Mar 21, 2019
I find the Sauvage hate bizzare. Scratchy, bombastic, and a bit simplistic. Many frags i dont care for, but the active vitreal many espouse would for me take quite a bit more than that. I dont find it unbalanced, though i do agree it is overdosed. Also, while buzzy and scratchy it doesnt have that wierd nauseating chemicals you get in a lot of downmarket brands and clones. It smells "good" on average to johnny public, and i totally get hating that safety, especially from a brand that has a history of taking chances. I could argue that they did, its a big statement of an overdose. But as for it being bland though, nobody haaates Gucci Guilty. Its boring, and just less than in most ways. All the cool kids hate Sauvage it seems.

Carbon is more of a lavendar barber robot thing to me. Sauvage a cynical cactus pepper bomb. They "feel" different to me.

The enormous popularity has a lot to do with Sauvage hate. If it has a medium seller, or was discontinued, people here would probably love it. I'm not defending Sauvage. Outside of the Parfum version, I don't think it's all that great. It's not as bad as people say it is, though.
 

Sheik Yerbouti

oakmoss fiend
Basenotes Plus
Jul 20, 2017
Didn’t wear the Carbon enough to give a note breakdown but when I first smelled it I instantly thought it and the Dior were more than just same ballpark. More like players in the same team.
 

Rabidsenses

Basenotes Dependent
May 10, 2019
I agree with the different manners in which the lavender accord is isolated in each. Lavender in Sauvage is a grey structure that, were it music vinyl, the diaphragm would read its limp and now more uncharacteristically opaque profile. On the other hand Luna Rossa Carbon keeps the lavender in technicolour, albeit it’s now seemingly encased in a shiny enamel, this hyper-accentuating its profile and lending a metallic/modern feel.

The cyberpunk or Replicants VS fresh pressed suit with lavender or Fred Deckard analogies used make a lot of sense.

Regarding the use of ambroxan I’ve always believed that if Sauvage is the true “ambroxan bomb” reference with a deep crater of that aromachemical, then Luna Rossa Carbon is more than just a saucerful but, rather, a pasta dish brimming with it. Funny thing, I had Sauvage EdT samples (a-bomb!) and have barely touched them. I eventually bought at bottle of Sauvage EdP (a-bomb light) and yet in February I exchanged it for the Parfum . . . a-bomb experiment gone, I guess, but I keep a more mature (understandably different) version of what is still admittedly a breakthrough profile of the 2010s.

Honestly, my nose has never allowed me to really understand the comparisons between the two. Cross profiling, sure, but they are principally different from one another that I think most people - with some time testing them - should not only know the difference but also be able to make a choice, were they asked to.

Myself, I acquired Luna Rossa Carbon. BUT I never chose it over Sauvage. I just really enjoy it on its own. But at the same time it would be disingenuous to say I enjoy it in a bubble unaware of the currents in the 2010s that beget it. Still, when I acquired a bottle there was no comparison to Dior whatsoever, thus the reason why I keep finding myself confused when this debate arises on BN.
 

Varanis Ridari

The Scented Devil
Basenotes Plus
Oct 17, 2012
Nice variety of answers, although I still think by the very virtue of it being a flanker that puts a twist on the DNA of another house's pillar, that the Prada will have less chance of making any indelible mark on the market or community and faces a greater likelihood of discontinuation. These kind of direct head-to-heads feel more fair when the competing product is also a pillar, since it brings more implied novelty to the game.
 

Danny Mitchell

Basenotes Institution
Mar 21, 2019
Nice variety of answers, although I still think by the very virtue of it being a flanker that puts a twist on the DNA of another house's pillar, that the Prada will have less chance of making any indelible mark on the market or community and faces a greater likelihood of discontinuation. These kind of direct head-to-heads feel more fair when the competing product is also a pillar, since it brings more implied novelty to the game.

Just speculation on my part, but I'm guessing the Carbon sells better than the regular Luna Rossa? But I get what you're saying about flankers not reaching the same level of success as a pillar release. I agree with that.
 

Varanis Ridari

The Scented Devil
Basenotes Plus
Oct 17, 2012
Just speculation on my part, but I'm guessing the Carbon sells better than the regular Luna Rossa? But I get what you're saying about flankers not reaching the same level of success as a pillar release. I agree with that.

Yeah, mostly because it lives in the shadow of the attached nameplate. Only stuff like Drakkar Noir succeeded in eventually becoming so important it rendered the pillar obsolete and thus discontinued.
 

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