Diluting Vanillin / Ethyl Vanillin Crystals (Aroma Chemicals) and Isolates

David Ruskin

Well-known member
May 28, 2009
Use Benzyl Benzoate/Benzyl Alcohol as your solvent. Try a 1.0% solution of Ethyl Vanillin (same as 10.0% solution of Vanillin). Ethyl Vanillin was first used in Shalimar, so it is entirely possible that Guerlain use it still.
 

stylez_911

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2015
I’m very late to this thread (sorry - have been neglecting Basenotes of late), so I’m not going to try to answer the shopping list of questions it started with but just focus on this bit: the misunderstanding might have arisen because ethyl vanillin is so much stronger smelling than vanillin, it means you can get a bit more vanilla odour for a given amount of discolouration.

However a better solution would be to use isobutavan (vanillin isobutyrate) which is much less discolouring and gives a lovely creamy note too. For white candles or soaps etc this is much more suitable.

Thanks for your suggestions Chris - they are much appreciated.

As you can probably tell from my initial comments and questions, I am new to the world of perfumery, and my primary goal is to simply create a creamy vanilla accord (which can be used in both carrier-oil for oil-based fragrances, or ethyl alcohol (perfumer's alcohol) for alcohol-based fragrances.

I am not too familiar with the technical terminology of the trade, but I have seen isobutavan pop-up on other discussion boards.

I am not too concerned with discoloration, unless the fragrance becomes dark brown like a vanilla extract, so in that regard, if vanillin will make my blend that dark, I have an problem :)

If the discoloration is more of a golden liquid, I am perfectly fine with that.

I do not intent to create candles or soaps or any other solid material; it is perfumery plain and simple :)

Quick question though; would it be unwise to use a carrier-oil based vanilla concentrated solution in an alcohol-based fragrance? For example, if I planned to create an alcohol-based fragrance using other alcohol-based oils/absolutes, but only have an FCO (carrier oil) based ethyl vanillin solution, would that still work? Or would I need to create a separate solution for the ethyl vanillin diluted in alcohol only?
 

stylez_911

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2015
Use Benzyl Benzoate/Benzyl Alcohol as your solvent. Try a 1.0% solution of Ethyl Vanillin (same as 10.0% solution of Vanillin). Ethyl Vanillin was first used in Shalimar, so it is entirely possible that Guerlain use it still.

So you're referring to your 50:50 (BB/BA) solvent you suggested earlier?

The main reason I wanted to use FCO as a solvent is for oil-based perfumes. I would be fine to use Ethyl Alcohol or your BB/BA solution for alcohol-based fragrances.

Would BB/BA solution be versatile enough in your opinion, that it can be blended in both oil-based and alcohol-based blends? I guess i'd lose the alcohol-free element if blending that in my oil-based frags.
 

stylez_911

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2015
You are all being very helpful and are providing great suggestions - thank you all so much!

I just want to reiterate the fact that I am an amateur (rookie) and I typically only use oil-based solutions (using 20% dilutions of essential oils in Fractionated Coconut Oil), however, I am also open to trying out alcohol-based fragrances as well.

This is where I am hoping to get more specific advice on how to create an Ethyl Vanillin solution (or solutions) that would allow me to simply add to my other vanilla-based solutions (made from FO's or Absolutes), in order to get the creamy vanilla accord i'm going for.

I currently have Fractionated Coconut Oil at my disposal; however, I am not against trying out other solvents for this purpose, as long as they are soluble and will work as a component in a blend that is dominated by 20% FCO dilutions.

What would be particularly helpful, is to obtain advice on the following:

1) A universal solvent for creating an ethyl vanillin solution that would mix well with FCO-based blends AS WELL AS ethyl alcohol-based blends

- I was hoping that an FCO-based solution alone would work fine in both oil-based and alcohol-based fragrances (though I am still unsure whether or not alcohol-based blends should keep with all components being alcohol-based solutions or not)

-- OR (if a universal solution is not achievable) --

2) A solvent for creating an ethyl vanillin solution that would mix well in FCO-based blends

- Obviously, I was thinking of dissolving the ethyl vanillin crystals directly (without use of other solvent) into Fractionated Coconut Oil to create the solution (if the crystals are soluble in FCO)

3) A solvent for creating an ethyl vanillin solution that would mix well in ethyl-alcohol based blends

- Since ethyl vanillin crystals are soluble in perfumer's alcohol, I would have created the solution that way without using any other solvents

--

Please forgive my ignorance yet again if I am missing something and making inaccurate assumptions.

I am simply trying to keep things simple, and I am simply trying to find a way to create solutions of Ethyl Vanillin that will work with FCO solutions AND / OR ethyl alcohol based solutions.

I know i'm repeating myself a lot and I do apologize.
 
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David Ruskin

Well-known member
May 28, 2009
Thanks for your suggestions Chris - they are much appreciated.

As you can probably tell from my initial comments and questions, I am new to the world of perfumery, and my primary goal is to simply create a creamy vanilla accord (which can be used in both carrier-oil for oil-based fragrances, or ethyl alcohol (perfumer's alcohol) for alcohol-based fragrances.

I am not too familiar with the technical terminology of the trade, but I have seen isobutavan pop-up on other discussion boards.

I am not too concerned with discoloration, unless the fragrance becomes dark brown like a vanilla extract, so in that regard, if vanillin will make my blend that dark, I have an problem :)

If the discoloration is more of a golden liquid, I am perfectly fine with that.

I do not intent to create candles or soaps or any other solid material; it is perfumery plain and simple :)

Quick question though; would it be unwise to use a carrier-oil based vanilla concentrated solution in an alcohol-based fragrance? For example, if I planned to create an alcohol-based fragrance using other alcohol-based oils/absolutes, but only have an FCO (carrier oil) based ethyl vanillin solution, would that still work? Or would I need to create a separate solution for the ethyl vanillin diluted in alcohol only?
Ethanol and fixed oils (e.g. FCO) do not mix. Never use fixed oils together with Ethanol.
 

David Ruskin

Well-known member
May 28, 2009
So you're referring to your 50:50 (BB/BA) solvent you suggested earlier?

The main reason I wanted to use FCO as a solvent is for oil-based perfumes. I would be fine to use Ethyl Alcohol or your BB/BA solution for alcohol-based fragrances.

Would BB/BA solution be versatile enough in your opinion, that it can be blended in both oil-based and alcohol-based blends? I guess i'd lose the alcohol-free element if blending that in my oil-based frags.

Benzyl Benzoate/Benzyl Alcohol will probably be soluble in FCO (as it is soluble in Candle wax) and can be used to dissolve Vanillin. That is why I suggested you use it.
 
Last edited:

David Ruskin

Well-known member
May 28, 2009
You are all being very helpful and are providing great suggestions - thank you all so much!

I just want to reiterate the fact that I am an amateur (rookie) and I typically only use oil-based solutions (using 20% dilutions of essential oils in Fractionated Coconut Oil), however, I am also open to trying out alcohol-based fragrances as well.

This is where I am hoping to get more specific advice on how to create an Ethyl Vanillin solution (or solutions) that would allow me to simply add to my other vanilla-based solutions (made from FO's or Absolutes), in order to get the creamy vanilla accord i'm going for.

I currently have Fractionated Coconut Oil at my disposal; however, I am not against trying out other solvents for this purpose, as long as they are soluble and will work as a component in a blend that is dominated by 20% FCO dilutions.

What would be particularly helpful, is to obtain advice on the following:

1) A universal solvent for creating an ethyl vanillin solution that would mix well with FCO-based blends AS WELL AS ethyl alcohol-based blends

- I was hoping that an FCO-based solution alone would work fine in both oil-based and alcohol-based fragrances (though I am still unsure whether or not alcohol-based blends should keep with all components being alcohol-based solutions or not)

-- OR (if a universal solution is not achievable) --

2) A solvent for creating an ethyl vanillin solution that would mix well in FCO-based blends

- Obviously, I was thinking of dissolving the ethyl vanillin crystals directly (without use of other solvent) into Fractionated Coconut Oil to create the solution (if the crystals are soluble in FCO)

3) A solvent for creating an ethyl vanillin solution that would mix well in ethyl-alcohol based blends

- Since ethyl vanillin crystals are soluble in perfumer's alcohol, I would have created the solution that way without using any other solvents

--

Please forgive my ignorance yet again if I am missing something and making inaccurate assumptions.

I am simply trying to keep things simple, and I am simply trying to find a way to create solutions of Ethyl Vanillin that will work with FCO solutions AND / OR ethyl alcohol based solutions.

I know i'm repeating myself a lot and I do apologize.
I have answered this at least three times, so it must be true ( Lewis Carroll ref. there if you can find it). I'm not going to repeat myself anymore. And yes, we get it, you are a beginner.
 

stylez_911

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2015
Another (silly) option is to create a contest to see who can duplicate Guerlain's SDV vanilla accord (only the vanilla aspect of the blend) as a fragrance oil that can be used in oil-based and alcohol-based solutions.

There is a Guerlain boutique in Toronto that is selling 30ml bottles of vanilla oil for $300. Not gonna happen.

There are several sources online who offer the SDV duplication, but it would be great to be able to see if anyone can create a quality duplicate of that vanilla accord and make it available for sale :)

People would probably pay a pretty penny for that accord.

I know that is way off topic and i'm getting ahead of myself :)
 

Bill Roberts

Well-known member
Mar 1, 2013
Benzyl benzoate, as David has suggested, is miscible (soluble in any proportions) with fractionated coconut oil.

So is benzyl alcohol.

You have many options available.

Also, as you don't have that many materials, it really would not be that big a deal to have both ethanol dilutions and FCO dilutions for working. And then when actually making product in quantity, just weigh out raw materials directly if they come out a sufficient weight to weigh with good precision. Or pick the appropriate diluted material if you need them to get the weight high enough for precision.
 

stylez_911

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2015
I have answered this at least three times, so it must be true ( Lewis Carroll ref. there if you can find it). I'm not going to repeat myself anymore. And yes, we get it, you are a beginner.

David, my apologies for making you repeat yourself.

My last post was written before I saw your answers to my earlier posts which answered my questions quite well.

I'm sorry about that!

Thanks so much for your patience.
 

stylez_911

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2015
Benzyl benzoate, as David has suggested, is miscible (soluble in any proportions) with fractionated coconut oil.

So is benzyl alcohol.

You have many options available.

Also, as you don't have that many materials, it really would not be that big a deal to have both ethanol dilutions and FCO dilutions for working. And then when actually making product in quantity, just weigh out raw materials directly if they come out a sufficient weight to weigh with good precision. Or pick the appropriate diluted material if you need them to get the weight high enough for precision.

I believe that David had suggested creating a solvent by blending the Benzyl Benzoate and Benzyl Alcohol 50:50, and use that as a solvent that can be the base of a solution that would work for both FCO based blends and ethanol based blends. Am I understanding that correctly?

Thanks!
 
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Bill Roberts

Well-known member
Mar 1, 2013
Yes, that is correct, David's expectation from solubility in candle wax, I indeed have found is true for FCO.

The only possible point is that benzyl benzoate and benzyl alcohol have some slight fragrance effect of their own. This probably will not be an issue, as with 10% or, even moreso, 20% vanillin or ethyl vanillin solution the amounts of these would be very small in the final formulation. They might even enhance. But they may give a slight change compared to diluting with alcohol (usable only for alcohol formula), FCO (usable only for oil formula), or IPM (suitable for either alcohol or oil formula.)
 

Chris Bartlett

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Jul 17, 2011
Yes, that is correct, David's expectation from solubility in candle wax, I indeed have found is true for FCO.

The only possible point is that benzyl benzoate and benzyl alcohol have some slight fragrance effect of their own. This probably will not be an issue, as with 10% or, even moreso, 20% vanillin or ethyl vanillin solution the amounts of these would be very small in the final formulation. They might even enhance. But they may give a slight change compared to diluting with alcohol (usable only for alcohol formula), FCO (usable only for oil formula), or IPM (suitable for either alcohol or oil formula.)

Personally I keep vanillin and ethyl vanillin in DPG at 50% - great for use in ethanol based work - but DPG is no good in FCO. I’ve never tried dissolving it in BB, but I expect that would be fine and at a high concentration I agree with Bill the slight odour would be massively overwhelmed. However at high concentrations it does take some time and a lot of stirring to get into solution: so I use an automatic stirrer - an investment I recommend to everyone.
 

stylez_911

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2015
Yes, that is correct, David's expectation from solubility in candle wax, I indeed have found is true for FCO.

The only possible point is that benzyl benzoate and benzyl alcohol have some slight fragrance effect of their own. This probably will not be an issue, as with 10% or, even moreso, 20% vanillin or ethyl vanillin solution the amounts of these would be very small in the final formulation. They might even enhance. But they may give a slight change compared to diluting with alcohol (usable only for alcohol formula), FCO (usable only for oil formula), or IPM (suitable for either alcohol or oil formula.)

That makes sense, so if I use IPM as the solvent to create the Ethyl Vanillin solution, there would be no need to consider other solvents then.

I have Perfumer's alcohol on hand, as well as FCO, so I can create solutions for those on their own. The IPM I would use as a "universal" solution.

I am thinking that would probably be my best option at this point.
 

David Ruskin

Well-known member
May 28, 2009
Personally I keep vanillin and ethyl vanillin in DPG at 50% - great for use in ethanol based work - but DPG is no good in FCO. I’ve never tried dissolving it in BB, but I expect that would be fine and at a high concentration I agree with Bill the slight odour would be massively overwhelmed. However at high concentrations it does take some time and a lot of stirring to get into solution: so I use an automatic stirrer - an investment I recommend to everyone.

Perfumery is empirical. I have personal experience of using Benzyl Benzoate/Benzyl Alcohol as a suitable solvent for Vanillin in Candles. I assume it would also be suitable for use in FCO. If you want, you can ignore my advice. I have nothing to prove and nothing to promote. I simply tell what I know to be true.
 

Chris Bartlett

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Jul 17, 2011
That makes sense, so if I use IPM as the solvent to create the Ethyl Vanillin solution, there would be no need to consider other solvents then.

I have Perfumer's alcohol on hand, as well as FCO, so I can create solutions for those on their own. The IPM I would use as a "universal" solution.

I am thinking that would probably be my best option at this point.

It might, but I’ve not tried using IPM either: I know it is miscible with FCO and Ethanol but with a LogP of over 7 I’m not sure how much vanillin or ethyl vanillin would dissolve in it without doing tests.
 

stylez_911

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2015
Personally I keep vanillin and ethyl vanillin in DPG at 50% - great for use in ethanol based work - but DPG is no good in FCO. I’ve never tried dissolving it in BB, but I expect that would be fine and at a high concentration I agree with Bill the slight odour would be massively overwhelmed. However at high concentrations it does take some time and a lot of stirring to get into solution: so I use an automatic stirrer - an investment I recommend to everyone.

I was originally considering DPG as the solvent until you mentioned that it is no good in FCO...

Since IPM and the Benzyl Benzoate / Benzyl Alcohol solutions would work with both FCO and Ethanol, those are the two i'm considering for my universal solution at this point, although I do appreciate your suggestion.
 

Chris Bartlett

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Jul 17, 2011
I was originally considering DPG as the solvent until you mentioned that it is no good in FCO...

Since IPM and the Benzyl Benzoate / Benzyl Alcohol solutions would work with both FCO and Ethanol, those are the two i'm considering for my universal solution at this point, although I do appreciate your suggestion.

I’ve tested DPG and FCO so I know they don’t mix - in fact it’s come up on this forum before.
 

stylez_911

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2015
Your inability to grasp the simplest of ideas. You seem to have a problem with understanding simple English sentences. Sorry if I am wrong.

The definition of "simple" in this case is tricky though... I am able to grasp the "simplest" of ideas; however, when there are technical terms and methods that I am not familiar with, I am depending on experts such as yourself to help me understand better.

I will apologize if I am wasting your time on here or frustrating you in any way.

Your suggestions have been helpful; however, I am trying to weigh your suggestions against those of others to see what would work best in my unique case.
 

stylez_911

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2015
Have you thought about using natural vanilla absolute? Apparently it will dissolve in oils and it has a very round, full vanilla scent profile without being super sweet. Downside of course is cost.

Thank you for your suggestion.

I have a Vanilla 10-Fold and will be using a Vanilla Absolute Oil as well for particular characteristics of the accord; however, the ethyl vanillin will provide the sweet, "bakery" vanilla accord that I am looking for.
 

Bill Roberts

Well-known member
Mar 1, 2013
Your suggestions have been helpful; however, I am trying to weigh your suggestions against those of others to see what would work best in my unique case.
I would say "weigh with," at least relative to what I posted and so far as I can tell what Chris posted, because none of the advice has been contradictory, and each and every advised answer would work fine.
 

stylez_911

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2015
I would say "weigh with," at least relative to what I posted and so far as I can tell what Chris posted, because none of the advice has been contradictory, and each and every advised answer would work fine.

I stand corrected, and you're right.

That's essentially what I meant, as I know that everyone's suggestions and advice are for the most part all potential solutions for my case.

I just don't exactly have the budget or resources to be able to test them all, so I am just trying to weigh my options while considering everyone's advice in relation to my given circumstances.
 

stylez_911

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2015
If you're making a fairly small amount of total formula, then it can be more accurate to weight out a number of 20% solutions than to weigh out pure materials.

For example let's say that your scale is accurate to only 0.01 g, as in the example above. And you have a material that makes up only 1% of the formula (this is common, actually there are often ingredients that make up only 0.1% of a formula!)

Unfortunately, when a scale "read" to 0.01 g, that doesn't mean being precise to 0.01 g. If it reads for example 0.10, the true value might typically be anywhere from 0.007 to 0.013. That would be unacceptably uncertain. So you'd want to weigh at the very least say 0.50 g, so that the true value would probably be no lower than 0.47 g and probably no higher than 0.53 g, which isn't brilliant precision but isn't too bad for fragrance.

Now let's say that this ingredient makes up only 1% of your formulation.

You have to make up 50 grams of formula then!

You will use up 80% less of your raw materials if you mix 50 grams of 20% solutions (which uses up only 10 g of essential oils) than if you mix 50 grams of pure essential oils.

It would be better to use a more precise scale reading to 0.001 g, but the same principle will apply. My savings from mixing mostly dilutions is very large compared to mixing pure materials.

But when really making up an amount of material because I'm settled on it, I'll weigh out the pure materials for all of the more common materials, say those making up 5% or more of the formula. Trace materials will still be done diluted, for better precision.

Bill, I was hoping that you can clarify something if you don't mind:

With regards to creating 80:20 solutions of alcohol:eo, would the correct way to measure it be by weight? As opposed to measuring the oils in a measuring cup (by volume)?

It seems as though both methods are used, so I just wanted to get your opinion on that.
 

Chris Bartlett

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Jul 17, 2011
Bill, I was hoping that you can clarify something if you don't mind:

With regards to creating 80:20 solutions of alcohol:eo, would the correct way to measure it be by weight? As opposed to measuring the oils in a measuring cup (by volume)?

It seems as though both methods are used, so I just wanted to get your opinion on that.

I’ve written about the pros and cons as well as given detailed instructions on how to do it by weight (which is a clue) on my blog in the post titled Weight or Volume. You may also find it helpful to review A Method for Blending which was written in response to questions much like yours.
 

stylez_911

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2015
I’ve written about the pros and cons as well as given detailed instructions on how to do it by weight (which is a clue) on my blog in the post titled Weight or Volume. You may also find it helpful to review A Method for Blending which was written in response to questions much like yours.

Thanks very much Chris!

That information will be very helpful!

Would you recommend diluting aromatic isolates and key accords in solutions in the same way as EO/FO/Absolutes?

I recently purchased Benzyl Benzoate, Nerolidol, as well as several other key accords so i'm a bit unsure if those should be diluted similarly.
 

Chris Bartlett

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Jul 17, 2011
Thanks very much Chris!

That information will be very helpful!

Would you recommend diluting aromatic isolates and key accords in solutions in the same way as EO/FO/Absolutes?

I recently purchased Benzyl Benzoate, Nerolidol, as well as several other key accords so i'm a bit unsure if those should be diluted similarly.

In general I recommend diluting everything to 10% except those materials that are so strong you need higher dilution to bring them down to a reasonable level. However neither Benzyl Benzoate nor Nerolidol are “key accords” they are individual aroma chemicals and in the case of BB it’s normally used as a solvent, relatively rarely as an aromatic ingredient (though it is also used in that way).

Key Accords is a phrase used by Perfumer’s Apprentice and if that’s where you’re buying from then they will be full strength blends - in that case they need dilution in just the same way. Many suppliers sell that sort of thing already let down (often to an unknown extent) in a solvent of some kind and in that case you might not want to dilute further, but really I’d recommend buying from a source that declares the dilution level so you know what you’ve got.

Fragrance Oils (FO) usually means a diluted perfume made for a particular purpose (e.g. candle making or soap making) and I don’t recommend you use those at all.
 

stylez_911

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2015
In general I recommend diluting everything to 10% except those materials that are so strong you need higher dilution to bring them down to a reasonable level. However neither Benzyl Benzoate nor Nerolidol are “key accords” they are individual aroma chemicals and in the case of BB it’s normally used as a solvent, relatively rarely as an aromatic ingredient (though it is also used in that way).

Key Accords is a phrase used by Perfumer’s Apprentice and if that’s where you’re buying from then they will be full strength blends - in that case they need dilution in just the same way. Many suppliers sell that sort of thing already let down (often to an unknown extent) in a solvent of some kind and in that case you might not want to dilute further, but really I’d recommend buying from a source that declares the dilution level so you know what you’ve got.

Fragrance Oils (FO) usually means a diluted perfume made for a particular purpose (e.g. candle making or soap making) and I don’t recommend you use those at all.

Thanks for clarifying that!

You're right, the Key Accords is from the Perfumer's Apprentice, so I will take your advice on that.

As for the Benzyl Benzoate, Floralozone, Nerolidol, I understand those are not actual accords and they are aroma chemicals. I was thinking of using them not as a solvent, but as fixatives to help increase the lasting power of my blends.

What are your thoughts on that?
 

stylez_911

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2015
Also, for your recommendation of diluting everything to 10%, thank you for the suggestion.

I am curious though, if I wanted to make an EDP, how would using 10% dilutions stack up in terms of potency compared to 20-25%?

Wouldn't 10% be pretty weak?
 

Chris Bartlett

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Jul 17, 2011
Yes, but for blending practice I recommend you don’t worry about the final strength too much: 10% is fine. When you’ve got something you’re happy with and want to make up a larger batch at a stronger level the spreadsheet you can download from my blog will help you to do so simply by changing the concentration of a few of the materials. Walk first, run later.

Floralozone isn’t a base note IMO, much less a fixative, it’s a floraliser, middle note and gives lift, freshness and diffusion to a fragrance as long as you’re careful not to overdose it. The other two both have good fixative effects particularly for florals. You really need to learn about materials one by one - you can’t generalise much.
 

stylez_911

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2015
Thank you for your insights Chris.

With regards to the spreadsheet you're referring to, is there a link you can provide to the spreadsheet from your blog?

Thank you!
 

stylez_911

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2015
I’ve tested DPG and FCO so I know they don’t mix - in fact it’s come up on this forum before.

Hey Chris,

I was just wondering if there are any key benefits using the Benzyl Benzoate / Benzyl Alcohol solvent option over the IPM option, and vice versa?

This of course is regarding the previous discussion in this post for creating a universal "solvent" that can be blended into either fixed oils (such as FCO) as well as ethanol.

As I can imagine, the BB/BA solution may slightly alter the scent of the solution a bit, which is a negative if it alters the scent too much, but does it have other particular benefits for the blend as a whole? Particularly as a fixative to enhance longevity?

What about IPM? Would that have particular benefits that the BB/BA solution doesn't?

Thanks very much!
 

stylez_911

Well-known member
Feb 27, 2015
Hi everyone,

It's been a little while since posting on here, but I just wanted to let everyone know that I have been experimenting with creating various types of Ethyl Vanillin solutions.

I was able to create a 1% dilution in Fractionated Coconut oil, as well as 10% and 20% dilutions in Ethanol.

I will be trying out IPM and DPG as well, which I am expecting to dilute nicely in 1, 10, and 20% concentrations.

I was hoping that some of you can shed light on a question I had regarding the use of such dilutions in a final formula:

If I were creating a final ethanol-based fragrance formula, would it be recommended to use the ethanol-based vanillin solution? Or would the DPG solution be recommended?

I am not sure if it will make a difference; however, I was thinking for ethanol-based formulas, it would be nice to have a "ready-to-go" solution that can be added into the final formula (in it's proper concentration of course). I am just not sure which solution is recommended for final blends.

I would truly appreciate some advice to that end, and any and all feedback is welcome.
 

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