Denatured alcohol 96% from Behawe

DruidHR

New member
Sep 21, 2022
Hello,

has anyone tried "denatured alcohol 96%" from Behawe.com?
Is this type of denatured alcohol with "methyl ethyl ketone" even good for perfumes?

Quote on alcohol from behawe.com:
Pure alcohol, 96 %, without the unpleasant odor of denaturants. This alcohol is denatured to, though - with methyl ethyl ketone. You smell nothing but the alcohol, the preserving effect is the same as that of pure ethanol

Thx in advance 😊
 

Alex F.

Basenotes Junkie
Nov 29, 2019
Hello,

has anyone tried "denatured alcohol 96%" from Behawe.com?
Is this type of denatured alcohol with "methyl ethyl ketone" even good for perfumes?

Quote on alcohol from behawe.com:


Thx in advance 😊
I've never heard of Behawe, but here are two observations:
- Methyl ethyl ketone is one of the three ingredients that, along with ethanol of course, make up the "Euro formulation" of "completely denatured alcohol". It smells of acetone/classic nail polish remover (there are health concerns about acetone, so today, nail polish removers are often acetone-free). It's explicitly listed as a "smelling agent", to make it easier to identify denatured alcohol by smell. As you can see on the linked page, there are "partially denatured alcohols" for use in cosmetics and perfumes, but as I only use undenatured alcohol, I can't give you any recommendation. This leads me to my second point.
- The point of using denatured alcohol in perfumery is the price (exemption from excise duty - it's not inherently better suited). €3,60/100ml ex. shipping is not an especially good one, in my opinion. I get my undenatured spirit of wine, 96% ABV, for less from the pharmacy. I don't know about excise duty on alcohol in Croatia, but see if you can find local suppliers of ethanol 96% and check the price. You may end up paying less than when ordering denatured alcohol online from abroad. E.g. pharmacies: Occasionally, you may be asked why you want it - once, some years ago, a pharmacist even wrote a big "dangerous" on the bottle before handing it to me - but in my experience, most pharmacies will readily sell smaller quantities.
 

DruidHR

New member
Sep 21, 2022
Hi Alex,

Thx alot for sharing your thoughts 🙂

I've never heard of Behawe, but here are two observations:
I found it under Europe suppliers list in "#Fragrance DIY Wiki/Suppliers of Perfumery Raw Materials"

The point of using denatured alcohol in perfumery is the price (exemption from excise duty - it's not inherently better suited). €3,60/100ml ex. shipping is not an especially good one, in my opinion. I get my undenatured spirit of wine, 96% ABV, for less from the pharmacy. I don't know about excise duty on alcohol in Croatia, but see if you can find local suppliers of ethanol 96% and check the price. You may end up paying less than when ordering denatured alcohol online from abroad. E.g. pharmacies: Occasionally, you may be asked why you want it - once, some years ago, a pharmacist even wrote a big "dangerous" on the bottle before handing it to me - but in my experience, most pharmacies will readily sell smaller quantities.
So, if I got it right I can buy "96% ethanol" (pure without anything in it, just ethanol) and use it in my perfumes?
 

ourmess

Basenotes Junkie
Apr 25, 2018
o, if I got it right I can buy "96% ethanol" (pure without anything in it, just ethanol) and use it in my perfumes?
You can use pure (190+) undenatured ethanol, yes. It's just more expensive than SDA40B denatured ethanol, but you work with what you can get.
 

DruidHR

New member
Sep 21, 2022
You can use pure (190+) undenatured ethanol, yes. It's just more expensive than SDA40B denatured ethanol, but you work with what you can get.
Wow that is great as I see alot 96% ethanol sold here in Croatia.
But before I start opening champagne I would like to check if this is the right type of 96% ethanol.

Quote from local store:
Ethyl alcohol Ph. Eur 6.0 96% - Aethanolum concentratum 96% for use in making tinctures, plant and fruit extracts and similar preparations for oral use, liqueurs, spirits...

Meets the regulations of the Rulebook on strong alcoholic beverages NN 61/09 and European Pharmacopoeia 6.0. The packaging comes with an excise stamp.

INCI: Alcohol
CAS: 64-17-5
EC: 200-578-6
 

Alex F.

Basenotes Junkie
Nov 29, 2019
Wow that is great as I see alot 96% ethanol sold here in Croatia.
But before I start opening champagne I would like to check if this is the right type of 96% ethanol.

Quote from local store:
Ethyl alcohol Ph. Eur 6.0 96% - Aethanolum concentratum 96% for use in making tinctures, plant and fruit extracts and similar preparations for oral use, liqueurs, spirits...

Meets the regulations of the Rulebook on strong alcoholic beverages NN 61/09 and European Pharmacopoeia 6.0. The packaging comes with an excise stamp.

INCI: Alcohol
CAS: 64-17-5
EC: 200-578-6
Yes. This is the quality/grade I use, too. "Ph. Eur." is the European Pharmacopoeia (pharmacopoeia europaea) mentioned later in the quote, the standard it complies with, in case you're wondering.
 

DruidHR

New member
Sep 21, 2022
Yes. This looks like the quality/grade I use, too. "Ph. Eur." is the European Pharmacopoeia (pharmacopoeia europaea) mentioned later in the quote, the standard it complies with, in case you're wondering.
Wohoooo 🎉🎊🍻🍻

I was busting my head from where to order perfumers alcohol, and now I found out that same store that I was buying perfumers alcohol are selling even better type of alcohol 😂🤣
I was searching for other perfumers alcohol because the one that they sell have very sweet smell which is from denaturants (if I'm correct).

Thx 🙂🙂
 

Alex F.

Basenotes Junkie
Nov 29, 2019
Wohoooo 🎉🎊🍻🍻

I was busting my head from where to order perfumers alcohol, and now I found out that same store that I was buying perfumers alcohol are selling even better type of alcohol 😂🤣
I was searching for other perfumers alcohol because the one that they sell have very sweet smell which is from denaturants (if I'm correct).

Thx 🙂🙂
Yeah, reading some of the advice on DIY-perfumery on the net, you may get the impression that you need perfumer's alcohol to make perfume. You don't. It's pointless if it's more expensive than undenatured alcohol.
 

DruidHR

New member
Sep 21, 2022
Yeah, reading some of the advice on DIY-perfumery on the net you may get the impression that you need perfumer's alcohol to make perfume. You don't. It's pointless if it's more expensive than undenatured alcohol.
Just wanted to add that 1lt of undenatured 96% etanol from above costs around 25€ and 1lt of perfumers alcohol around 33€.
Yea it's pointless, but as you said above alot of informations on the net that can guide you in wrong direction.
 

Poboijosh

Basenotes Member
Dec 3, 2013
Hello!

From personal experience, I would try to get a hold of a 200 proof non-denatured perfumers alcohol. They’re out there. I don’t know how easily available they’re in Croatia but here in the States, you don’t need a license to purchase. They are usually 99.8% pure alcohol. I’ve had nothing but success with blending with this alcohol ratio. I’ve tried lesser grades in the past and you get what you pay for. Maceration time is 6-8 weeks so keep this in mind. Also, you must shake your flacon at least twice a week. After 2 months, your perfume is ready!
 

Alex F.

Basenotes Junkie
Nov 29, 2019
Hello!

From personal experience, I would try to get a hold of a 200 proof non-denatured perfumers alcohol. They’re out there. I don’t know how easily available they’re in Croatia but here in the States, you don’t need a license to purchase. They are usually 99.8% pure alcohol. I’ve had nothing but success with blending with this alcohol ratio. I’ve tried lesser grades in the past and you get what you pay for. [...]
I'd say save the extra cost for the anhydrous alcohol and go with 96% ABV (I guess you read 95% more often in the US, because it gives you an even 190 proof instead of an awkward 192.)
 

DruidHR

New member
Sep 21, 2022
Hello!

From personal experience, I would try to get a hold of a 200 proof non-denatured perfumers alcohol. They’re out there. I don’t know how easily available they’re in Croatia but here in the States, you don’t need a license to purchase. They are usually 99.8% pure alcohol. I’ve had nothing but success with blending with this alcohol ratio. I’ve tried lesser grades in the past and you get what you pay for. Maceration time is 6-8 weeks so keep this in mind. Also, you must shake your flacon at least twice a week. After 2 months, your perfume is ready!
Thx for the advice but I already ordered 96% 🙂

Yes. This is the quality/grade I use, too. "Ph. Eur." is the European Pharmacopoeia (pharmacopoeia europaea) mentioned later in the quote, the standard it complies with, in case you're wondering.
Hey Alex,
just wanted to say thx again 🙂🙂
Got my 96% Ethyl alcohol and need to admit that it smell quiet pleasant (I do not like strong alcoholic drinks, except beer 🤣😂)


IMG_20221012_103220.jpg
 

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