creamy

gido

Well-known member
May 31, 2008
hello!

what ingredients are available that give your perfume a rich, mellow creaminess?

i do not mean the scent of actual cream, but the effect it has (with food). texture, color, round-out smoothing, etc.: creamy!

how is this effect achieved in perfumery?
 

Asha

Well-known member
Jan 15, 2008
Lactones give a milky effect. I'm not sure what is in Secretions Magnifique, though.
 
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Bigsly

Well-known member
Feb 20, 2008
I think the original fougere idea is the first example in modern perfumery of this kind of "creamy" blend. In any case, some notes are known to have this effect (lavender and sage, for example), and then there are notes that are already soft, like vanilla and amber, so these two elements work well together. Then you need some other notes to make it interesting, so that it's not a bland cream. You can use certain florals (like rose), patchouli, etc. to create richness without simultaneously creating "rough edges." But you might still need a little bit of something rough, such as suede, or else it might not be appealing to the "mass market." For example, in Dunhill Desire for men (red bottle), there is patchouli, rose, vanilla, neroli, and teak. The patchouli, rose, and vanilla are fairly "creamy," but the teak creates a rough edge and the neroli supplies what I call a "nose twisting" quality, and so this scent is two steps removed from what I'd call a simple, creamy fragrance.
 
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janmeut

Well-known member
Aug 11, 2006
I am not sure if I understand what you mean.

"Creamy" in perfumery usualy means that it has a certain fragrance reminding of dairy, coconut, vanilla, lactones etc. But that is not what you are asking I think

When you mean: how can I make a fragrance that is smooth, where the aspects of the fragrance change nice, without harsh notes: that is experience, including the use of a lot of "tricks". Some fragrance compounds are harsh, but give the perfume character, so you have to use them. By blending the right modifiers you can make a harsh note smoother, so that it better fits in the composition. A simple trick for instance is the use of ylang ylang to make a smooth change from top to heart. Of course you can only use it when ylang ylang fits in the composition. But the bottomline is that experience is the best, so simply start with trying and remember what helped a mixture to make it "creamy".
 

gido

Well-known member
May 31, 2008
I am not sure if I understand what you mean.

jan, you do for a large part. but besides smoothness, i also meant fullness, and there is something with the texture. the old diorella has it, while the new one lacks it. and i think, i smelled it only once, the really old pour un homme has more of this than the new one, which still has it. there are probably more examples, many reformulations smell thin and flat compared to the original stuff. and less rich.

i was wondering if this is a certain ingredient that is now restricted, a matter of budget, a modern preference for skinnier and clearer fragrances, or else?

but i suppose it's in the craft of blending.
however, if there are ingredients or tricks that you know of, i would be very happy to hear about them.

(i need a lot of this effect, for a certain abstract idea that's going round in my head for quite some time. i will need to learn so much, so very much, before i will be able to even approach this idea.)
 

gido

Well-known member
May 31, 2008
interesting answers, everybody. thank you very much!

bigsly: i soon will get my order from hekserij.nl, containing more than one of the notes you mention. i will test these. i had no idea that patchouli is creamy, and i have no clue what teak smells like, except that its likely to be woody. ;)

asha, i think there are many lactones? which ones do you think are the most suitable for this effect? i know i am going to ask for persicol on my next order. :)
 

janmeut

Well-known member
Aug 11, 2006
Maybe you mean impact, tenacity or diffusion? All these aspects can be manipulated by formulating, althought there are of course limitations.
Diorella contained a lot of eugenol, that is probably less in these days due to the fact that it is a strong allergen, the same for oakmoss. Other major components like Hedione, Jasmone, Helional and EO Patchouli are not problematic. But besides regulations and safety perfumes are somtimes altered because the fashion changes.
 

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