Cologne possible cause of low coronavirus cases in Turkey

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cacio

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Nov 5, 2010
Colonia is lovely, but unless you keep applying to hands everytime you touch something...
 

Pallas Moncreiff

Well-known member
Dec 16, 2018
Perhaps just washing hands with soap water, and performing necessary ablutions for prayers multiple a day could be reason it hasn’t spread as widely. You got to have 60-95% ethanol or isopropanol alcohol to kill bugs.
Also Turkey’s tourism has taken a hit due to war and issues in the neighboring countries.
They weren’t seeing as much international tourism traffic.
I doubt that kolonya is the only reason.

They had a 2009 flu pandemic.
If kolonya is to be accepted as such a panacea, they shouldn’t have influenza burdening their hospitals in winter either.
I’ve visited often and have medical professional friends in Istanbul, Ankara and Bodrum.
Their virus infection profile is not different from the rest of the world.
Their medical community’s concern is, are they testing enough people.
 

sahinksylmz

Well-known member
Jun 4, 2017
https://www.dailysabah.com/turkey/expat-corner/its-time-to-commend-turkeys-cologne-culture

In fact, it could very well be Turkey’s affinity for kolonya that may have ensured the country remained immune to the virus crisis for so long as using this refreshing and disinfecting product has always been a prevailing tradition in this country.
As a Turk from Turkey, I can say that it is our tradition to use cologne and it us very commen in our country.

SM-N915F cihazımdan Tapatalk kullanılarak gönderildi
 

BruceB

Well-known member
May 6, 2019
Perhaps just washing hands with soap water, and performing necessary ablutions for prayers multiple a day could be reason it hasn’t spread as widely. You got to have 60-95% ethanol or isopropanol alcohol to kill bugs.
Also Turkey’s tourism has taken a hit due to war and issues in the neighboring countries.
They weren’t seeing as much international tourism traffic.
I doubt that kolonya is the only reason.

They had a 2009 flu pandemic.
If kolonya is to be accepted as such a panacea, they shouldn’t have influenza burdening their hospitals in winter either.
I’ve visited often and have medical professional friends in Istanbul, Ankara and Bodrum.
Their virus infection profile is not different from the rest of the world.
Their medical community’s concern is, are they testing enough people.

This sounds very reasonable.
Best!
BruceB
 
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Danny Mitchell

Well-known member
Mar 21, 2019
Perhaps just washing hands with soap water, and performing necessary ablutions for prayers multiple a day could be reason it hasn’t spread as widely. You got to have 60-95% ethanol or isopropanol alcohol to kill bugs.
Also Turkey’s tourism has taken a hit due to war and issues in the neighboring countries.
They weren’t seeing as much international tourism traffic.
I doubt that kolonya is the only reason.

They had a 2009 flu pandemic.
If kolonya is to be accepted as such a panacea, they shouldn’t have influenza burdening their hospitals in winter either.
I’ve visited often and have medical professional friends in Istanbul, Ankara and Bodrum.
Their virus infection profile is not different from the rest of the world.
Their medical community’s concern is, are they testing enough people.

That's the biggest thing....testing and dealing with it in the early stages. Which the U.S. failed to do. Kudos to them.
 

Zizzy

Well-known member
Jan 7, 2019
That article is just a complete nonsense! Just black PR.
Coronavirus is transformed through air, I have no idea how cologne is going to prevent this.
 

Foamywax

Well-known member
May 2, 2013
The media outlets in turkey have lied about covid 19 infections. Last week only 1 person was officially infected. That is dangerous.
 

oudaddict

Well-known member
Feb 2, 2017
That article is just a complete nonsense! Just black PR.
Coronavirus is transformed through air, I have no idea how cologne is going to prevent this.

Well, scientifically it is not an "airborne" virus. So, unless someone showing the symptoms sneezes or coughs in your direction, the NHS says that washing your hands is a key part of preventing the spread of viruses such as the coronavirus.
 

Sheik Yerbouti

oakmoss fiend
Basenotes Plus
Jul 20, 2017
An apple a day and apparently for some people 22 rolls of toilet paper keeps the doctor away.



Even though it can be transmitted via the air its not the only way.
Washing your hands with good ol’ soap does help stop the spread via direct contact with other contaminated surfaces. Something to do with the fats (lipids) in soaps.

Keep safe people.
 

Ken_Russell

Well-known member
Jan 21, 2006
Thank you for sharing. For some reason, liked this particular type of scent anyway during each of the admittedly rare and sparse testings. Therefore if true would consider this an added benefit of already using a fragrance style do enjoy before knowing this.
 
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Sheik Yerbouti

oakmoss fiend
Basenotes Plus
Jul 20, 2017
The media outlets in turkey have lied about covid 19 infections. Last week only 1 person was officially infected. That is dangerous.

One case does seem a bit low.


Their virus infection profile is not different from the rest of the world.
Their medical community’s concern is, are they testing enough people.

This is probably about right.
 

Zizzy

Well-known member
Jan 7, 2019
Well, scientifically it is not an "airborne" virus. So, unless someone showing the symptoms sneezes or coughs in your direction, the NHS says that washing your hands is a key part of preventing the spread of viruses such as the coronavirus.
Ofc, but how many of you apply cologne on your palms? Let me guess! Zero! Also alcohol would be absorbed by skin and evaporate over time, so you still have to wash your hands constantly or spray them with fragrance. Which makes that article a bullshit i.e. advertisement
 

Nastka

Well-known member
Mar 6, 2011
I can definitely see it work the same as hand sanitiser when used judiciously to refresh oneself. I'm not sure how widely it is used in Turkey (it's definitely used very copiously at my local Turkish barber), but Eau de Cologne such as 4711 has been used in Europe the past, often in summer, if out and about, and before and after a meal if soap and water weren't readily available.
 

oudaddict

Well-known member
Feb 2, 2017
Ofc, but how many of you apply cologne on your palms? Let me guess! Zero! Also alcohol would be absorbed by skin and evaporate over time, so you still have to wash your hands constantly or spray them with fragrance. Which makes that article a bullshit i.e. advertisement

In Turkey, Kolonya is always applied directly to the hands first. It is not the same thing as aftershaves and EdT etc.
 

Pallas Moncreiff

Well-known member
Dec 16, 2018
There is NO study to prove the Kolonya rids human skin of bacteria/virus in sufficient amount.
Soap and water do-- and after 20 seconds of rubbing contact, not just in 5 seconds.
The microbobe count doesn't come down that easily.
Hand sanitizer recommended to use these days, all have concentrations above 75%.
Kolonya rarely goes past 50%.

Such articles are dangerous from a medical point of view and give a false sense of security to folks.
Plain soap and water washing, and if not readily available, verified hand sanitizers are the mainstay.
 

Nastka

Well-known member
Mar 6, 2011
There is NO study to prove the Kolonya rids human skin of bacteria/virus in sufficient amount.
Soap and water do-- and after 20 seconds of rubbing contact, not just in 5 seconds.
The microbobe count doesn't come down that easily.
Hand sanitizer recommended to use these days, all have concentrations above 75%.
Kolonya rarely goes past 50%.

Such articles are dangerous from a medical point of view and give a false sense of security to folks.
Plain soap and water washing, and if not readily available, verified hand sanitizers are the mainstay.

Good to know. I assumed it would be just alcohol and fragrance, but I had a look and some ingredient lists and they all seem to include water, thus lowering the alcohol content.
 

oudaddict

Well-known member
Feb 2, 2017
There is NO study to prove the Kolonya rids human skin of bacteria/virus in sufficient amount.
Soap and water do-- and after 20 seconds of rubbing contact, not just in 5 seconds.
The microbobe count doesn't come down that easily.
Hand sanitizer recommended to use these days, all have concentrations above 75%.
Kolonya rarely goes past 50%.

Such articles are dangerous from a medical point of view and give a false sense of security to folks.
Plain soap and water washing, and if not readily available, verified hand sanitizers are the mainstay.

You'll find that most of the Kolonya on the market is around 80% ethanol.

http://www.turkishculture.org/lifestyles/turkish-culture-portal/eau-de-cologne-208.htm
 

Pallas Moncreiff

Well-known member
Dec 16, 2018
There is no standard or authority which controls Kolonya’s production or contents, as hand sanitizer production has to follow guidelines.
I’m also aware that a Turkish health minister has said it kills covid-19 virus, and people have emptied the shelves.
 

maksidrom

Well-known member
Dec 30, 2003
I had a dream last night that all the fragrance designers started selling kolonya. It's the only thing you could get. Lol

Well, LVMH is converting their perfume production into hand sanitizer factories, so who knows - maybe your dream will come true.

Having said that, I think this turkish kolonya article is a very nicely timed and strategically marketed puff piece in the GQ/Vogue vein.
I was especially amused by a recent publicity photo of John Malkovich being served kolonya while wearing gloves and apparently nobody had a problem with that:

john.jpg
 

BruceB

Well-known member
May 6, 2019
There is NO study to prove the Kolonya rids human skin of bacteria/virus in sufficient amount.
Soap and water do-- and after 20 seconds of rubbing contact, not just in 5 seconds.
The microbobe count doesn't come down that easily.
Hand sanitizer recommended to use these days, all have concentrations above 75%.
Kolonya rarely goes past 50%.

Such articles are dangerous from a medical point of view and give a false sense of security to folks.
Plain soap and water washing, and if not readily available, verified hand sanitizers are the mainstay.

Again, this sounds very reasonable.
 
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