Chart of Most Frequently Used Perfume Notes by Deborah Dolen

BelleBeryl

Well-known member
Dec 8, 2009
google searched the mabelwhite.com site I get a not found 404 tried access several listings scrolling down the google page trying to find links ......? has anyone else read/tried the site listings ?
 
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Bill Roberts

Well-known member
Mar 1, 2013
google searched the mabelwhite.com site I get a not found 404 tried access several listings scrolling down the google page trying to find links ......? has anyone else read/tried the site listings ?
Probably just one of those momentary Internet things. Earlier I'd accessed the site with no trouble, and it's accessible now also.

However, to search for notes within the listings, it's necessary to search the http://www.mabelwhite.net/ site.

For example, "tuberose" appears in 20 pages there. It would be necessary to by hand count how many times on each page.

EDIT: Which Luís Carlos already did, and posted an Excel spreadsheet for us (above.)
 
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DuNezDeBuzier

Well-known member
Nov 7, 2009
I thought that this was interesting data...

From Deborah Dolen: "
If you are just getting started at making perfume, I created a chart, below, as a "basis." I took a list I created a few years ago, of the Top 300 Designer Perfume Blends and created the chart based on that data."

Chart of Most Frequently Used Perfume Notes
by Deborah Dolen
Most Popular Top NotesMost Popular Heart NotesMost Popular Base Notes
1. Bergamot
2. Peach
3. Mandarin Orange
4. Greens
5. Aldehydes
6. Lemon
7. Coriander
8. Black Currant
9. Galbanum
10. Black Violet Leaves
11. Pepper
12. Grapefruit
13. Rosewood
14. Pineapple
15. Plum
16. Raspberry
17. Marigold
18. Sage
19. Tangerine
20. Apricot
21. Cardamom
22. Mango
23. Lime
24. Passion fruit
25. Pear
26. Petigrain
27. Strawberries
28. Water Lilly
29. Coconut
30. Ginger
31. Cassis

  1. Rose
  2. Jasmine
  3. Ylang Ylang
  4. Lily of the Valley
  5. Tuberose
  6. Hyacinth
  7. Orange Blossom
  8. Neroli
  9. Carnation
  10. Iris
  11. Orris
  12. Narcissus
  13. Violet
  14. Gardenia
  15. Geranium
  16. Honeysuckle
  17. Lilac
  18. Orchid
  19. Red Currant
  20. Heliotrope
  21. Wisteria

  1. Sandalwood
  2. Musk
  3. Amber
  4. Vanilla
  5. Oak moss
  6. Patchouli
  7. Vetivert
  8. Civet
  9. Cedar wood
  10. Benzoin
  11. Incense
  12. Tonka Bean
  13. Honey
  14. Moss
  15. Clove
  16. Spices - Anise
  17. Styrax
  18. Opoponax
  19. Bay Rum
  20. Leather










Perfume Notes Propensity Chart
© Deborah Dolen 2011

Interesting... but no lavender?

I did something somewhat similar back when I had only 164 bottles in the collection (mostly mens). I plotted out the scent accords noted in the basenotes review database for these to come to a possible answer to the question: "What notes most frequently are included in the frags you liked enough to buy?" Incidentally, I threw the top 10 or so in a bottle along with some synth castoreum and civet... not marketable (because I really don't know what I'm doing) but I've thrown together much worse.

NOTE / PREVELANCE IN INVENTORY
1. Bergamot (48%)
2. Sandalwood (43%)
3. Musk (40%)
4. Cedarwood (38%)
5. Patchouli (35%)
6. Vetiver (34%)
7. Amber (30%)
8. Lemon (29%)
9. Oakmoss (28%)
10. Lavender (27%)
11. Vanilla (24%)
12. Tonka Bean (23%)
13. Jasmine (23%)
14. Leather (22%)
15. Rose (18%)
16. Geranium (17%)
17. Black Pepper (16%)
18. Carnation (15%)
19. Nutmeg (13%)
20. Orange (13%)
21. Cinnamon (13%)
22. Basil (12%)
23. Mandarin (12%)
24. Ambergris (10%)
25. Cardamom (10%)
etc
 

Bill Roberts

Well-known member
Mar 1, 2013
Interesting... but no lavender?

I did something somewhat similar back when I had only 164 bottles in the collection (mostly mens). I plotted out the scent accords noted in the basenotes review database for these to come to a possible answer to the question: "What notes most frequently are included in the frags you liked enough to buy?" Incidentally, I threw the top 10 or so in a bottle along with some synth castoreum and civet... not marketable (because I really don't know what I'm doing) but I've thrown together much worse.

NOTE / PREVELANCE IN INVENTORY
1. Bergamot (48%)
2. Sandalwood (43%)
3. Musk (40%)
4. Cedarwood (38%)
5. Patchouli (35%)
6. Vetiver (34%)
7. Amber (30%)
8. Lemon (29%)
9. Oakmoss (28%)
10. Lavender (27%)
[etc]
An idea that's helped me so far, but obviously would badly limit a real expert, is that using mostly or entirely materials which are particularly commonly used in perfumes may make it easier to come up with something decent. It also helps narrow down to a more manageable number of components.

This is out of an idea that materials which are very commonly used almost must tend to be versatile materials, whereas rarely-used materials may tend to be more suited to fitting exact needs quite specific to the formulas they are used in.

Of course, choosing to never use such materials would be very limiting and is not the idea, but considering them this way may help.

I don't know for sure if that would be useful advice for anyone else, but putting that in practice has helped me.
 
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Bill Roberts

Well-known member
Mar 1, 2013
Well, anything along these lines is going to be "a" snapshot of something, rather than the picture of how it is. For example, I went perfume shopping for my wife on Christmas, trying to find something she'd like that would be actually good and not one she knows and likes already. What a horrible experience, as of course many have found! Once after smelling a test strip I had to grab something to wipe my tongue, it was that bad!! As well as having to make nose-blowing type efforts to get it out of my sinuses. A vast percentage of the stuff was just horrible: a fact that is all too familiar.

So, a snapshot of most popular claimed notes among all perfumes available for purchase at a given moment will be one thing, a snapshot of most popular claimed notes among best-sellers could be another, a snapshot of such notes among enduring classics could be still another, etc. At the risk of belaboring the thing.
 

mumsy

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Jan 31, 2010
Peach is the second most popular top note? That's a big surprise.

Especially as peach isn't peach but more likely to be something like '5-oxodecanoic acid'.... and that's attractive on the notes list ....lol
 

iivanita

Banned
Feb 23, 2012
xxx

- - - Updated - - -

Peach is the second most popular top note? That's a big surprise.

how do you write this under your name? :

Founder- Cosa Nosetrahttp://www.basenotes.net/wardrobe/4661

i dont know how to put the same thing under my profile??

basenotes is so slow since yesterday i can not move around spent hours trying to do it?
 
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DeborahDolen

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 24, 2013
Mumsy I just started a blog on here - I did not know was available. Still trying to get my photo to display with comments, but otherwise VERY COOL to also have a "blog" on Base Notes! I will find a reason to be around. A very good smelling reason !

- - - Updated - - -

Here it is ! http://www.basenotes.net/blogs/13441617-DeborahDolen

I think I picked a bad day to show up to and create a blog. Within 24 hours the site seemed to be moving to other servers - so I will go back at it soon. It was very cool.



Note: This post was imported from the Huddler forum software, and may have missing images or strange formatting. More info here.
 

DeborahDolen

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 24, 2013
Well, anything along these lines is going to be "a" snapshot of something, rather than the picture of how it is. For example, I went perfume shopping for my wife on Christmas, trying to find something she'd like that would be actually good and not one she knows and likes already. What a horrible experience, as of course many have found! Once after smelling a test strip I had to grab something to wipe my tongue, it was that bad!! As well as having to make nose-blowing type efforts to get it out of my sinuses. A vast percentage of the stuff was just horrible: a fact that is all too familiar.

So, a snapshot of most popular claimed notes among all perfumes available for purchase at a given moment will be one thing, a snapshot of most popular claimed notes among best-sellers could be another, a snapshot of such notes among enduring classics could be still another, etc. At the risk of belaboring the thing.

VERY VERY VERY thoughtful husband! Someday I aspire to have one like you. I lost a great hubby to cancer, rather young. Kids are grown, I am just bored.



Note: This post was imported from the Huddler forum software, and may have missing images or strange formatting. More info here.
 

Bill Roberts

Well-known member
Mar 1, 2013
Thank you for the kind words!



I'm sorry for your loss. It has to be terrible at any time in life to lose a spouse, but especially hard when unexpectedly young.



Note: This post was imported from the Huddler forum software, and may have missing images or strange formatting. More info here.
 

DeborahDolen

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 24, 2013
Super excited to be attending the Flavorists International Convention on Long Boat Key this week. I will be working on perfume formulas and posting some good ideas and sources after the new year.



Note: This post was imported from the Huddler forum software, and may have missing images or strange formatting. More info here.
 

DeborahDolen

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 24, 2013
Paul I am still learning how to post here-and this is a VERY OLD post but I wanted you and a few others to know I went to Grasse, France this Thanksgiving and spent a full day with THREE "noses" and amazing what I learned-which very much applies to the fragrance materials propensity list I created a few years back. So I wrote a long article on how those three stages of notes are constructed--as well as a few materials I never thought about such as "Bamboo" - the article is here:

http://www.basenotes.net/entries/12...rasse-France-Review-and-Tips-by-Deborah-Dolen

I am not sure I had to leave the entire quote below to talk to you here. There is no simple "reply" button. Hope you are having a good holiday season start.

I thought that this was interesting data...

From Deborah Dolen: "
If you are just getting started at making perfume, I created a chart, below, as a "basis." I took a list I created a few years ago, of the Top 300 Designer Perfume Blends and created the chart based on that data."

Chart of Most Frequently Used Perfume Notes
by Deborah Dolen
Most Popular Top NotesMost Popular Heart NotesMost Popular Base Notes
1. Bergamot
2. Peach
3. Mandarin Orange
4. Greens
5. Aldehydes
6. Lemon
7. Coriander
8. Black Currant
9. Galbanum
10. Black Violet Leaves
11. Pepper
12. Grapefruit
13. Rosewood
14. Pineapple
15. Plum
16. Raspberry
17. Marigold
18. Sage
19. Tangerine
20. Apricot
21. Cardamom
22. Mango
23. Lime
24. Passion fruit
25. Pear
26. Petigrain
27. Strawberries
28. Water Lilly
29. Coconut
30. Ginger
31. Cassis

  1. Rose
  2. Jasmine
  3. Ylang Ylang
  4. Lily of the Valley
  5. Tuberose
  6. Hyacinth
  7. Orange Blossom
  8. Neroli
  9. Carnation
  10. Iris
  11. Orris
  12. Narcissus
  13. Violet
  14. Gardenia
  15. Geranium
  16. Honeysuckle
  17. Lilac
  18. Orchid
  19. Red Currant
  20. Heliotrope
  21. Wisteria

  1. Sandalwood
  2. Musk
  3. Amber
  4. Vanilla
  5. Oak moss
  6. Patchouli
  7. Vetivert
  8. Civet
  9. Cedar wood
  10. Benzoin
  11. Incense
  12. Tonka Bean
  13. Honey
  14. Moss
  15. Clove
  16. Spices - Anise
  17. Styrax
  18. Opoponax
  19. Bay Rum
  20. Leather










Perfume Notes Propensity Chart
© Deborah Dolen 2011
 

DeborahDolen

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 24, 2013
Mumsy I went to Grasse France this Thanksgiving and wrote a more in depth article about how they construct the base, middle and top notes. It was really fascinating and applies to the prevalence chart I wrote some years back that is posted here by Paul. the new article is here http://www.basenotes.net/entries/12...rasse-France-Review-and-Tips-by-Deborah-Dolen

Most definitely I need to adjust my list - and that will take a few weeks. They were using some very cool esters I never thought about-such as bamboo. When I got back home I thought I remembered seeing a three stage desk at a building I just bought and was THRILLED to see it WAS an "Organ" and the chances of that were like slim since the property had zero to do with flavor or perfume. Hope everyone is having a great holiday starter. I lost my lover this summer to leukemia so I will just pour myself into work.
 
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