Cartier Les Epures de Parfum

Mar 13, 2012
Apologies if this has already been discussed, but I did not find anything by searching.

I am interested in the 4 perfumes in this range: Pur Kinkan, Pur Magnolia, Pur Muget and Pur Rose.

Can anyone who has tried them let me know what they are like?

Is the Kinkan really like kumquat? Is the Rose a "pure" rose and how does the Muget compare to Diorissimo?

Thanks in advance.
 
Mar 13, 2012
In case anyone is interested, I went to the Cartier boutique and sniffed this range to see what it is like.

Les Epures de parfum EdT range came out in 2020 and the perfumer is Mathilde Laurent.

First off, I love the bottle designs (see below for one example). So pretty!

Of the three EdT's (the rose ended up being in a different range) my two favorites were the Pur Magnolia and the Pur Muget.

I do not really know what a real magnolia smells like, but this one is so fresh, light and slightly sweet (a little like a floral Smartie candy). it was so cheerful and addicitve. The only drawback is it is fleeting, and wears close to the skin. This may benefit by being sprayed on clothes too.

The Pur Muget is going to be compared to Diorissimo since they both are basically a lily of the valley perfume. This one is crisper and greener/fresher than Diorissimo. It also has good longevity given that it wears rather delicately.

I was most excited to try Pur Kinkan but ultimately it was too sharp and a bit sour on my skin.

In the end I got the Pur Magnolia since I have nothing like it in my collection and it really is a "happy" perfume. Perfect for summer and warner climates.

1655633320579.png
 

hednic

Basenotes Institution
Oct 25, 2007
My granddaughter has all three of these, and while she loves them all, like you, the Magnolia is her preferred.
 

Cook.bot

Flâneuse
Basenotes Plus
Jan 6, 2012
do not really know what a real magnolia smells like, but this one is so fresh, light and slightly sweet (a little like a floral Smartie candy). it was so cheerful and addicitve. The only drawback is it is fleeting, and wears close to the skin. This may benefit by being sprayed on clothes too.

This is a job for @Kotori , our resident magnolia maven. She definitely needs to try this.

I was most excited to try Pur Kinkan but ultimately it was too sharp and a bit sour on my skin.

This is the only one of the line that grabbed my attention in your original post. I used to have a couple of kumquat trees in the kitchen garden at my job, and I was always trying to come up with uses for the unusual fruit, which reverses the usual structure: the thick peel is sweet/sour, and the interior flesh is sour and bitter. But I did love the way they smelled. If the perfume came off sharp and sour on your skin, it's probably doing an accurate job of reproducing the natural smell of the fruit.
 

Kotori

In my little cloud
Basenotes Plus
Aug 17, 2006
This is a job for @Kotori , our resident magnolia maven. She definitely needs to try this.



This is the only one of the line that grabbed my attention in your original post. I used to have a couple of kumquat trees in the kitchen garden at my job, and I was always trying to come up with uses for the unusual fruit, which reverses the usual structure: the thick peel is sweet/sour, and the interior flesh is sour and bitter. But I did love the way they smelled. If the perfume came off sharp and sour on your skin, it's probably doing an accurate job of reproducing the natural smell of the fruit.
Ooh! I hadn’t heard about these… I will definitely need to give them a go. I’m also growing a kumquat tree.
 
Mar 13, 2012
This is a job for @Kotori , our resident magnolia maven. She definitely needs to try this.



This is the only one of the line that grabbed my attention in your original post. I used to have a couple of kumquat trees in the kitchen garden at my job, and I was always trying to come up with uses for the unusual fruit, which reverses the usual structure: the thick peel is sweet/sour, and the interior flesh is sour and bitter. But I did love the way they smelled. If the perfume came off sharp and sour on your skin, it's probably doing an accurate job of reproducing the natural smell of the fruit.
Luckily, I did have a reference for the kumquats (unlike the magnolia) but it still was sharp in an unpleasant way on me. I was really hoping it was the one of the three that I would like best because the idea is fairly original. Maybe a candied kumquat peel might have been better LOL. Of course, everyone's skin is different.
 

Kotori

In my little cloud
Basenotes Plus
Aug 17, 2006
Would love to get your feedback. The magnolia is really lovely in a sweet floral way. Whenever I hear "magnolia" I am reminded of the Dead song, Sugar Magnolia!
I’ll see if I can find some. Sweet and floral doesn’t sound much like a magnolia, though. While I enjoy the smell of magnolia more than most other smells, I do think maybe @Cook.bot had a point when she indicated that magnolias have an air of threat. It’s not a light or easy smell. When I describe them, it’s usually that the blossoms themselves are a creamy mix of lemon, mint, and rose, with none of the cheese-funk or fungi-umami we usually think of when we think of creaminess; it’s more the waxiness of a white floral with none of the fullness in the back of your throat. When they’re fresh, they smell sharp and alittle like rain. When they’re a day old, they smell somewhat like rotten citrus fruit.

But the blossom is rarely without the tree, and the tree is an important piece of the composition. It’s an earthy, semi-tropical tree with thick, waxy stems and gummy leaves that snap sharply when stepped on. The sharp green of the leaf is similar to a lime leaf, and the tree itself has a thick canopy that can create a low, dank fort, and an accompanying air of dampness.

***

That’s the best I’ve got.
 
Mar 13, 2012
I’ll see if I can find some. Sweet and floral doesn’t sound much like a magnolia, though. While I enjoy the smell of magnolia more than most other smells, I do think maybe @Cook.bot had a point when she indicated that magnolias have an air of threat. It’s not a light or easy smell. When I describe them, it’s usually that the blossoms themselves are a creamy mix of lemon, mint, and rose, with none of the cheese-funk or fungi-umami we usually think of when we think of creaminess; it’s more the waxiness of a white floral with none of the fullness in the back of your throat. When they’re fresh, they smell sharp and alittle like rain. When they’re a day old, they smell somewhat like rotten citrus fruit.

But the blossom is rarely without the tree, and the tree is an important piece of the composition. It’s an earthy, semi-tropical tree with thick, waxy stems and gummy leaves that snap sharply when stepped on. The sharp green of the leaf is similar to a lime leaf, and the tree itself has a thick canopy that can create a low, dank fort, and an accompanying air of dampness.

***

That’s the best I’ve got.
Thanks for this detailed description and you're right, the Cartier then doesn't really sound like a true magnolia. This perfume is not creamy at all. More fresh and floral. At least on me. Now I am really interested in you and Cook.bot to see what it smells like on you.
 

Cook.bot

Flâneuse
Basenotes Plus
Jan 6, 2012
But the blossom is rarely without the tree, and the tree is an important piece of the composition. It’s an earthy, semi-tropical tree with thick, waxy stems and gummy leaves that snap sharply when stepped on. The sharp green of the leaf is similar to a lime leaf, and the tree itself has a thick canopy that can create a low, dank fort, and an accompanying air of dampness.

All of which makes them not only menacing (in my opinion), but probably the messiest tree you could ever have in your yard. Not only are you constantly cleaning up under it, but you can imagine what such a tree does to any car parked near it.
 

Kotori

In my little cloud
Basenotes Plus
Aug 17, 2006
All of which makes them not only menacing (in my opinion), but probably the messiest tree you could ever have in your yard. Not only are you constantly cleaning up under it, but you can imagine what such a tree does to any car parked near it.
You’re absolutely right. However, in that regard, I think magnolias are in stiff competition with Silk Blossoms (pink mimosas). Man, when those feathery blossoms get stuck to your car! And don’t even get me started on the seed pods. Those things volunteer 40 times a summer. No, literally.

But apologies for the partial hijack, @purplelilac. It could be awhile before I find any of that Cartier, but I’ll let you know when I do! It still sounds lovely.
 
Mar 13, 2012
You’re absolutely right. However, in that regard, I think magnolias are in stiff competition with Silk Blossoms (pink mimosas). Man, when those feathery blossoms get stuck to your car! And don’t even get me started on the seed pods. Those things volunteer 40 times a summer. No, literally.

But apologies for the partial hijack, @purplelilac. It could be awhile before I find any of that Cartier, but I’ll let you know when I do! It still sounds lovely.
Hijacks welcome! I grew up in the Northeast of the US and I remember some gorgeous blooming trees like dogwood and weeping cherry but no magnolias or mimosa. I think there were tulip trees. In Japan we had plum, cherry and peach but those blooms were light and not sticky, The ginkgo was sticky though.
 

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