Best vintage scents (current formulations only) for a young guy?

Airegin

Well-known member
Sep 25, 2017
I've just tried Habit Rouge and it's fantastic but doesn't suit me very well, it's too classy for casual wear.

I did manage to grab a bottle of Équipage for €80 which is pretty good. Will try that later today.
 

OldSchoolScents

Well-known member
Jun 7, 2019
But... But lavender is the best note :cry:


I'd recommend Egoiste, Havana, Equipage, Habit Rouge, Bel Ami (might be a bit too masculine though). Platinum Egoiste has a lot of lavender, but in a different way than in Drakkar Noir. Lots of people who don't typically wear old scents like Platinum Egoiste so I'd recommend giving it a sniff and see if you can handle the lavender.

If you're not a fan of lavender or Drakkar Noir then I might recommend steering clear of most of the aromatic fougeres/woody aromatics (eg Brut, Paco Rabanne, Azzaro, Pasha, Safari, Tsar, Zino) as although they aren't uber masculine powerhouse, they are all lavender forward. Also, for a number of years after Drakkar Noir, many fragrances after took inspiration from it so you'll get a sharp, clean lavender with oakmoss for most of the mid to late 80s fougeres.
 

Airegin

Well-known member
Sep 25, 2017
But... But lavender is the best note :cry:


I'd recommend Egoiste, Havana, Equipage, Habit Rouge, Bel Ami (might be a bit too masculine though). Platinum Egoiste has a lot of lavender, but in a different way than in Drakkar Noir. Lots of people who don't typically wear old scents like Platinum Egoiste so I'd recommend giving it a sniff and see if you can handle the lavender.

If you're not a fan of lavender or Drakkar Noir then I might recommend steering clear of most of the aromatic fougeres/woody aromatics (eg Brut, Paco Rabanne, Azzaro, Pasha, Safari, Tsar, Zino) as although they aren't uber masculine powerhouse, they are all lavender forward. Also, for a number of years after Drakkar Noir, many fragrances after took inspiration from it so you'll get a sharp, clean lavender with oakmoss for most of the mid to late 80s fougeres.

Great advice, thanks. I already have and love Egoiste. I love Bel Ami too and don't think it's too masculine but I prefer Bel Ami Vétiver which I own as well.
 

Marty McFly

Well-known member
Jan 18, 2020
Green Irish Tweed.

It never smells dated or 'old manish' and can be worn in any situation. I suppose you could do Davidoff Cool Water if you want to save a few bucks, but I think Cool Water actually does smell a bit dated, cheaper, and maybe has a bit of Lavender which you want to avoid, while I don't get any of that with GIT.

Also Moschino Uomo?, while reformulated is still excellent. I started wearing Uomo? when I was in my early 20s, (I'm 43 now) and I recently picked up a new bottle. The open is a little different from what I remember, but this is still an underrated classic. It's masculine, but still very youthful, slightly sweet without being cloying, and smooth.
 

Tristan45

Well-known member
Jun 30, 2017
Well apart from making you have wear Caron Pour un Homme for a week to get you past your irrational lavender hatred, Dior Eau Sauvage EDT - utterly classic, citrus aromatic, laden with hedione which gives it a jasmine whiff, with a bit of a clean but sweaty vibe. Still a huge seller in France and Dior haven't actually ruined this one, the 2019 reformulation of Grès Cabochard EDT - a very unisex green chypre closely related to Aramis (same perfumer), but not as rugged/spicey as Aramis, that said, you can't go wrong with Aramis itself although you'll probably say it's too masculine. The original Aramis family of scents by Bernard Chant are all worth exploring in their current formulations Devin, the greener one, 900, very floral laden, and J.H.L. a lovely oriental amber. Going with the not too masculine theme, any green chypre from the 70's that was marketed for women is really worth exploring, there are few still hanging in there and still available - although not strictly a chypre Chanel No. 19 EDT, a sort of green floral leather, is fantastic and very wearable by everyone. The best citrus aromatic unisex leather you can get hold of Eau d'Hermès is really worth trying, particularly as you seem to know a couple of the other Hermes scents (same perfumer as did Eau Sauvage).
 

Airegin

Well-known member
Sep 25, 2017
Just tried the Équipage I bought today. Absolutely wonderful stuff. Forgot to mention that I recently bought Eau d'Hermès and I think it's phenomenal. That's what inspired me to start this thread.
 

Tristan45

Well-known member
Jun 30, 2017
Well if you like Eau d'Hermes that's marvellous. Preaching to the converted! I'd have to recommend Caron's Tabac Blond (1919), just reformulated as a parfum, hopefully not ruined (Caron do now label it as a unisex), a very beautiful leather, smoky, with some great notes of carnation, but not harsh. Sticking with Caron, and yes, there's a touch of lavender in it, but 3eme Homme (Third Man) is a beautiful citrus, aromatic fougere, with floral, indolic and fruity notes, definitely a metrosexual affair. Another vote too for Guerlain's Vol de Nuit, green and floral over a chypre base, very unisex and finely crafted.
 

Airegin

Well-known member
Sep 25, 2017
Well apart from making you have wear Caron Pour un Homme for a week to get you past your irrational lavender hatred,


You know what, I think I'll give lavender a chance. It's funny cause I have a bottle of Prada Luna Rossa Carbon I like even though it smells a bit like Drakkar Noir. Maybe I can better stand modern takes on lavender or maybe I'm just being ignorant.

I would love some lavender recommendations now to get me started, as long as the lavender is not too pronounced.
 

Tristan45

Well-known member
Jun 30, 2017
I'd still go for Caron Pour un Homme - best Provençal lavender essences balanced with herbal notes and overlaid on vanilla and musks. It's a classic for a reason. Quality of the materials is just streets ahead of what you'd find in Drakkar Noir, and I think there's a lot more in that brew that is probably giving rise to offence! Dior's ode to Caron Pour un Homme is Eau Noire, that adds liquorice and immortelle to the brew. Fantastic stuff if you can find it (it is available in France). Dior's latest Sauvage Elixir contains a quality lavender as a prominent note balanced with all the spices and woods. The Sauvage line is not really my thing, but this did stand out as noteworthy. Fougères will all generally have lavender to some degree or another and there are countless numbers to choose from. Givenchy Gentleman 2017 EDT has a lavender note in addition to the iris and pear - it's worth trying.
 

StylinLA

Well-known member
Aug 9, 2009
You know what, I think I'll give lavender a chance. It's funny cause I have a bottle of Prada Luna Rossa Carbon I like even though it smells a bit like Drakkar Noir. Maybe I can better stand modern takes on lavender or maybe I'm just being ignorant.

I would love some lavender recommendations now to get me started, as long as the lavender is not too pronounced.

Not ignorant, it feels like there was some scent you tried and hated which had a prominent lavender note and you've over attached the hatred primarily to the lavender note in it. The fact that you like Luna Rossa Carbon sort of illustrates that. (I've had similar issues with saffron).

I'll suggest Caron 3rd Man. Has some lavender. It is fairly vintage and impossibly pretty for a men's scent. But not really feminine. A neat trick to pull off.
 

Airegin

Well-known member
Sep 25, 2017
I'm not sure if it's just me but I've tried Habit Rouge, Antaeus and Guerlain Vetiver and while great none of these seem at all suitable for a young casually dressed man (way too formal). They seem more suitable for a businessman or formal occasions which I'd rather avoid.

So far my favorites are Eau Sauvage, Eau d'Hermes, Déclaration, Équipage and Egoïste (I own all of these). I would also count Bel Ami as a scent that's suitable for me but I already have Bel Ami Vétiver which is even better.

Out of these that are already recommended which ones would work well for casual wear (yay) and which ones are very formal (nay)? I want to slim down this list a little.

Vol de Nuit
Knize T'en
Derby
Platinum Egoïste
Moustache EDT
Heritage
Havana
Boucheron PH
Aramis Tuscany
Moschino Como
Caron Pour Un Homme
Grès Cabochard
Chanel No. 19
Gianfranco Ferre for Man
Capucci Pour Homme
Pour Monsieur by Chanel
Caron Tabac Blond
3eme Homme
Eau Noire
Sauvage Elixir
Catagan
 

ImaFedec

Well-known member
Sep 12, 2019
Hmm, could you maybe point out what you look for in a casual and a formal scent? None of these looks overly formal or casual, but all (that I've tried, about half of them) are classics.

For instance, I would personnaly not consider to wear scents that are heavy on leather in formal settings (in MY professional situation). In this instance, Knize Ten would not be in the formal category for me, but more casual wearing. Same with Derby.
 

Airegin

Well-known member
Sep 25, 2017
Hmm, could you maybe point out what you look for in a casual and a formal scent? None of these looks overly formal or casual, but all (that I've tried, about half of them) are classics.

For instance, I would personnaly not consider to wear scents that are heavy on leather in formal settings (in MY professional situation). In this instance, Knize Ten would not be in the formal category for me, but more casual wearing. Same with Derby.

It's hard to describe but anything that smells especially distinguished, classy or dandy. Scents that you'd associate more with gentlemen, men in suits, businessmen etc. Guerlain Vetiver and Habit Rouge give me that impression while the ones I prefer (see my last post) don't. I love the smell of those Guerlains but they just don't match with how I look and dress.
 

Toxicon

Well-known member
May 29, 2021
It's hard to describe but anything that smells especially distinguished, classy or dandy. Scents that you'd more associate with gentlemen, men in suits, businessmen etc. Guerlain Vetiver and Habit Rouge give me that impression while the ones I prefer (see my last post) don't.

I think you'll find this is entirely subjective, just like what folks consider seasonally appropriate or best for day / night wear. For example, Guerlain Vetiver doesn't strike me as a formal scent at all. It smells like a bright burst of citrus and raw green earth mixed with darker spice and tobacco. I could wear it with a suit if I wanted to (and I have), but it strikes me as a more natural fit for more casual attire. But we all see these things differently. Eau Sauvage feels more dressed up to me, personally, mainly because it feels much more "perfumey," but I also don't get along with the dirty jasmine very well, which is what it is. By contrast, I love Egoiste now, and it doesn't strike me as particularly buttoned up, but I've never thought of it as a young man's scent either. But preferences and associations vary. What's important is whether you like it and feel like it suits your personality and style.

Anyway, I'm early 40s and wore vetiver fragrances all through my 20s and 30s before recently expanding my horizons. I would just continue to sample widely, set things aside if you don't immediately connect with them, and continue to revisit and see if your tastes change over time (mine sure have).
 

TRBeck

Well-known member
May 27, 2008
I think you'll find this is entirely subjective, just like what folks consider seasonally appropriate or best for day / night wear. For example, Guerlain Vetiver doesn't strike me as a formal scent at all. It smells like a bright burst of citrus and raw green earth mixed with darker spice and tobacco. I could wear it with a suit if I wanted to (and I have), but it strikes me as a more natural fit for more casual attire. But we all see these things differently. Eau Sauvage feels more dressed up to me, personally, mainly because it feels much more "perfumey," but I also don't get along with the dirty jasmine very well, which is what it is. By contrast, I love Egoiste now, and it doesn't strike me as particularly buttoned up, but I've never thought of it as a young man's scent either. But preferences and associations vary. What's important is whether you like it and feel like it suits your personality and style.

Anyway, I'm early 40s and wore vetiver fragrances all through my 20s and 30s before recently expanding my horizons. I would just continue to sample widely, set things aside if you don't immediately connect with them, and continue to revisit and see if your tastes change over time (mine sure have).


Great post.

Guerlain Vetiver is a one-bottle wardrobe IMO as it adapts to you, to weather, to situation…

I’ve worn it with a suit, too, as well as with jeans and a T-shirt. Shorts and sandals? Sure. Cardigan or corduroys? Why not! It’s wonderful stuff in any vintage. I have worn it for as long as I’ve worn scent and it has worked for me all the way through, serving just as well in dad cologne mode these days as it did when I was in my early 30s and just starting to sort out my career and figure out who I was. Bright, earthy, spicy, mossy, comfortable, confident, and classic. One I aim never to be without.

Having said that, much of this is subjective. I wore Hammam Bouquet in August in Texas with jeans as a 32-year-old. If you feel comfortable with it, do it.
 

Ed Wardian

Well-known member
Oct 28, 2020
Roma Uomo by Laura Biagiotti (Annick Menardo)

Minotaure by Paloma Picasso, Sculpture pour Homme by Nikos (both Michel Almairac)

Similar wheelhouse yet all distinctly different, borderline unisex in essence yet masculine, no lavender notes and not dated. Though I loathe using that term since I'm 20th Century at heart, mind and soul, and yes, age ;)

Cheers Airegin!
 
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Toxicon

Well-known member
May 29, 2021
Great post.

Guerlain Vetiver is a one-bottle wardrobe IMO as it adapts to you, to weather, to situation…

I’ve worn it with a suit, too, as well as with jeans and a T-shirt. Shorts and sandals? Sure. Cardigan or corduroys? Why not! It’s wonderful stuff in any vintage. I have worn it for as long as I’ve worn scent and it has worked for me all the way through, serving just as well in dad cologne mode these days as it did when I was in my early 30s and just starting to sort out my career and figure out who I was. Bright, earthy, spicy, mossy, comfortable, confident, and classic. One I aim never to be without.

Thanks! And yes, exactly - the reason this sprung to mind today is because I wore Guerlain Vetiver this morning, purely for my own gratification, while (sadly) working away the Sunday in my home office, wearing black sweatpants and a heavy metal t-shirt. This was the epitome of weekend homebody casual conditions, and somehow it fit the mood quite nicely. (Spouse and kids didn't blink.)
 

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