Best designer Aqua

freewheelingvagabond

Well-known member
Jun 10, 2012
My SOTE

GA_ADG_Profumo_Pack_with_Ingredients_RVB_3000.jpg
 

ImaFedec

Well-known member
Sep 12, 2019
I do not enjoy marines, so I do not know many but the only designer marine fragrances I enjoy are Light Blue Eau Intense Homme by D&G (the woman's version is even better, but not a marine) and the all time classic Acqua di Gio Armani
 

Hugh V.

Well-known member
Dec 9, 2016
Bvlgari Acqva is pretty good. It's a heftier aquatic in my opinion though, so it's not too well-suited for summer weather, imo. But a really pleasant smell.

Aqua di Gio is still a great freshie but can get boring.

I've come around to Issey Miyake. After wearing AdG so much, the slightly spicier but just as fresh L'eau d'Issey is a welcome change.

Nautica Voyage is a great aura scent. I personally don't like wearing it because it's so recognizable, but it's always a welcome smell when I notice it on other people.
 

Brian5701

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
May 28, 2009
A lot of stores near me are carrying Missoni Wave, which I think is just as good if not better than the Bvlgari line. Worth a sniff.

There's also Tom Ford Oud Minerale for a non-citrus aquatic. Powerful and long-lasting. Not everyone's cup of tea though.
 
Jul 7, 2012
Polo Blue EdT gets my vote without thinking too much.

I'd probably give the nod to Polo Blue EdT too. I haven't tried any of the flankers though.

Honestly, if Acqua Di Gio hadn't been so popular for so long, it would surely be my pick. It's still excellent, but the fact that it was the most commonly worn men's scent for so many years meant it was everywhere, which makes it smell common now even though it truly is a great fragrance.


Chanel Bleu De Chanel EDT

Bleu De Chanel isn't aquatic. It's citrus, woods & incense.
 

Varanis Ridari

The Scented Devil
Basenotes Plus
Oct 17, 2012
I'd probably give the nod to Polo Blue EdT too. I haven't tried any of the flankers though.

Honestly, if Acqua Di Gio hadn't been so popular for so long, it would surely be my pick. It's still excellent, but the fact that it was the most commonly worn men's scent for so many years meant it was everywhere, which makes it smell common now even though it truly is a great fragrance.




Bleu De Chanel isn't aquatic. It's citrus, woods & incense.

You'd probably like Polo Blue Gold Blend.

Agree with Acqua di Giò pour Homme. Great stuff but too ubiquitous.

I like calling Bleu de Chanel and its ilk "post-aquatics" because they keep the "blue fresh" abstract theme minus the actual aquatic notes.
 
Jul 7, 2012
I like calling Bleu de Chanel and its ilk "post-aquatics" because they keep the "blue fresh" abstract theme minus the actual aquatic notes.

I totally disagree. It's woods & incense, not oceanic nor anything related to the smell of bodies of water. There's nothing blue about the smell. It's citrus, woods & incense, but because people smell with their eyes, they see the word "blue" and convince themselves what they're smelling must be aquatic. If Chanel had named it Bois De Chanel, nobody would think it's aquatic. That name would actually fit better, but in 2010, aquatics were still riding high and my guess is that Chanel wanted a safe name for what was, at the time, a challenging scent, so they named it blue (this was the first mainstream success of a norlimbanol scent if I'm not mistaken). It's funny how people smell with their eyes.

Bleu De Chanel helped launch the synth-woods era which came after the aquatic era, which came after the powerhouse era, end so on and so on. It'll be interesting to see what era comes next, but I have a feeling that's still a decade away.
 

Varanis Ridari

The Scented Devil
Basenotes Plus
Oct 17, 2012
I totally disagree. It's woods & incense, not oceanic nor anything related to the smell of bodies of water. There's nothing blue about the smell. It's citrus, woods & incense, but because people smell with their eyes, they see the word "blue" and convince themselves what they're smelling must be aquatic. If Chanel had named it Bois De Chanel, nobody would think it's aquatic. That name would actually fit better, but in 2010, aquatics were still riding high and my guess is that Chanel wanted a safe name for what was, at the time, a challenging scent, so they named it blue (this was the first mainstream success of a norlimbanol scent if I'm not mistaken). It's funny how people smell with their eyes.

Bleu De Chanel helped launch the synth-woods era which came after the aquatic era, which came after the powerhouse era, end so on and so on. It'll be interesting to see what era comes next, but I have a feeling that's still a decade away.

I never said Bleu de Chanel smelled aquatic, and if you think that I did, you're reading into my statement while ignoring what I actually said, which is troublingly solipsistic. I also feel like you're leaning too hard into "blue must equal airy/aquatic/soapy and nothing else" because as we've already established, blue is a color and not an odor. Violets - the odor of which is represented in Bleu de Chanel via ionones - can be blue, so as banally pedantic of a qualifier as that is to me, I'm going to offer it as counterargument for why Blue de Chanel can be seen as smelling "blue". Mint and mentholated notes can also carry a "blue" aesthetic in fragrance marketing, but I digress.

Before we start tearing at each other's throats over some philosophical debate of "what is blue?" vis à vis perfumery, I'm just going to re-state that I call things like BdC, Sauvage, and Y EdP "post-aquatic blue" fragrances because they came after aquatics but are not aquatic, yet co-op similar packaging, marketing, and a mass-appeal structure of fresh/floral/wood/musk without using any aquatic semantics or accords commonly associated with aquatics (although some examples like Y EdP sneak a marine note in there), but invariably have the color blue somewhere in their presentation (usually the bottle).

They are fresh, they are often fruity and citric, have a laundry clean appeal, and some light woody/ambery or musky base, and blue packaging, just like many aquatics and borrowed from the aquatic genre they've mostly replaced in the mainstream. However they are not aquatics, they are something else. What that something else is, be it sawdust or stardust, is irrelevant to why I say "post-aquatic blue". You don't have to agree, you just have to understand, instead assuming I meant some relation to smelling like water because they're blue. Sauvage literally has commercials set in a freaking desert, come on man.
 
Jul 7, 2012
I never said Bleu de Chanel smelled aquatic, and if you think that I did, you're reading into my statement while ignoring what I actually said, which is troublingly solipsistic. I also feel like you're leaning too hard into "blue must equal airy/aquatic/soapy and nothing else" because as we've already established, blue is a color and not an odor. Violets - the odor of which is represented in Bleu de Chanel via ionones - can be blue, so as banally pedantic of a qualifier as that is to me, I'm going to offer it as counterargument for why Blue de Chanel can be seen as smelling "blue". Mint and mentholated notes can also carry a "blue" aesthetic in fragrance marketing, but I digress.

Before we start tearing at each other's throats over some philosophical debate of "what is blue?" vis à vis perfumery, I'm just going to re-state that I call things like BdC, Sauvage, and Y EdP "post-aquatic blue" fragrances because they came after aquatics but are not aquatic, yet co-op similar packaging, marketing, and a mass-appeal structure of fresh/floral/wood/musk without using any aquatic semantics or accords commonly associated with aquatics (although some examples like Y EdP sneak a marine note in there), but invariably have the color blue somewhere in their presentation (usually the bottle).

They are fresh, they are often fruity and citric, have a laundry clean appeal, and some light woody/ambery or musky base, and blue packaging, just like many aquatics and borrowed from the aquatic genre they've mostly replaced in the mainstream. However they are not aquatics, they are something else. What that something else is, be it sawdust or stardust, is irrelevant to why I say "post-aquatic blue". You don't have to agree, you just have to understand, instead assuming I meant some relation to smelling like water because they're blue. Sauvage literally has commercials set in a freaking desert, come on man.

See title of thread: Best Designer Aqua.
 

slpfrsly

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 1, 2019
I find agreement in both of the positions about blue/aquatic and Bleu de Chanel. The dark blue is, to my mind, most symbolic of the sky at dusk i.e. a fragrance that denotes its suitability to both day time wear and night time wear. It's a scent that can be worn both at work and at leisure, formal or play. This is something the light blue/aquatic scent struggled to do. Chanel et al are bridging the blue and black (the best example is Narciso Rodriguez's Bleu Noir) that takes elements of the light blue category and turns it in to something instantly understandable to customers yet, aromatically, is quite different. There is something conceptually 'aquatic' in some of the blues - something akin to shower gel, particularly evident in the Versace dark blue - but it's a real stretch to include them in a thread like this. As far as I understand it, 'aqua' here means watery-aquatic, which means everything from fruity-fresh scents like Escape and Good Life, through to the dank marines of Oud Minerale and Sel Marin. That excludes dark blues.
 

ToughCool

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Jun 12, 2008
You'd probably like Polo Blue Gold Blend.

Agree with Acqua di Giò pour Homme. Great stuff but too ubiquitous.

I like calling Bleu de Chanel and its ilk "post-aquatics" because they keep the "blue fresh" abstract theme minus the actual aquatic notes.

I love Polo Blue Gold Blend and the EDP!

As for other suggestions above I’m not a fan of the Bvlgari line. I may be wrong but when Aqua came out it was a hit to me due to it being a little more of a peppery aquatic. Upon trying it later I was taken aback by how fishy it had gotten. Weird.
 

speedracer

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Nov 12, 2015
Best:
Aqua Amara
Invictus Aqua (2016 or 18)
Polo Blue Eau de Parfum
Light Blue Eau Intense pour Homme

Should also consider:
Cool Water
Nautica Oceans
Perry Ellis Aqua (simple and cheap, but pretty decent)
Tommy Bahama scents (my favs (original and St Barts) I don't consider true aquatics but they have some good offerings otherwise)
 

Redneck Perfumisto

League of Cycloöctadiene Isomer Aestheticists
Basenotes Plus
Feb 27, 2008
...

I like calling Bleu de Chanel and its ilk "post-aquatics" because they keep the "blue fresh" abstract theme minus the actual aquatic notes.

Nice. I have struggled with the problem of encapsulating the idea of non-aquatic "blue" (mostly) fresh fragrances in something other than that breaking, jumbled lawnbag of terms. By centering only on the truth that they have largely followed if not succeeded blue aquatics, filling that niche with a completely different organism (or two or three), and avoiding specifics, the problem is solved. One can even drag in almost-water-reminiscent non-blue faquas like my new ambroxy guilty pleasure, Yellow Dream, in its crystal clear presentation, and its "cool, barely wet" feeling that apes aquatics but carefully doesn't go there. Post-aquatic, indeed! A powerful idea!

In fact, by adding the idea that other genres which evoked "eau" historically are in some sense "pre-aquatic", the fiber-bundling of fragrance evolution around new components which change our entire view of fragrance by superior reminiscence, takes on a really satisfying form.
 

rum

Moderator
Moderator
Basenotes Plus
Mar 17, 2011
As far as I understand it, 'aqua' here means watery-aquatic, which means everything from fruity-fresh scents like Escape and Good Life, through to the dank marines of Oud Minerale and Sel Marin. That excludes dark blues.

I'm not going to be drawn into discussing colours and how they relate to scents. I think most of this is marketing and besides, if the actual colour of a scent matches the bottle/box, there is likely to be a shit tonne of artificial colours added to the mixture to create that effect.

But it's interesting how you mention Escape. One of my first ever fragrances, and fruity-fresh is a great way to describe it. I totally get the 'acqua' association here.
 

notspendingamillion

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Sep 2, 2018
Gio is the best of its kind.
Uomo Aqua for iris
Sel Marin i guess if you want that briny salt
Falling into the Sea if you want artistic expression
I assume the Acqua Allegoria line by Guerlain has some really nice scents.
 

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