Anyone else feels very overwhelmed by the barrage of new releases?

Jcelello

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Mar 26, 2019
Definitely. It is hard to keep up and a lot of mediocre and redundant stuff is flooding the market, making it harder to sift through.
 

Oud Dude

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Jun 22, 2018
Absolutely and unfortunately I don’t have deep enough pockets this year to go chasing everything down like I used to be able to do. And like Jcelello said, there’s also a lot of cash-grabby releases floating around- even from some of my favorite houses that has left me a little gun shy.
 

Foamywax

Well-known member
May 2, 2013
I find the past more interesting especially where fragrances are concerned.
I shouldn't but I can't help myself. I'm not interested in trends like I used to be. Yesterday I was thinking to myself I need a bottle of Kouros...
All these flankers that keep coming out are nothing really special in my opinion its all marketing anyway.
 

ultravisitor

Well-known member
Nov 4, 2014
One thing I've been pretty good with this hobby is making sure I don't let myself get carried away by FOMO. There are LOTS of fragrances constantly flooding the market, many of which will not be going anywhere anytime soon. I don't need to know everything and be part of a conversation for every new fragrance. If something new enters the market, then I'll get to it when I get to it.

If I need to be reminded of how much I already have and how much I'm not in need of anything new, all I have to do is reach for one of my many bottles that hasn't seen some action for a bit. Wearing something that I've owned for a long time but haven't reached for in a while always reminds me how much I should appreciate what I'm already lucky enough to have.
 

GoldWineMemories

Well-known member
Nov 22, 2019
Not too much. Unfortunately, there haven't been many that are a fit for me. Most perfumes I'll buy can be sampled in store, and since that's a small amount compared to the overarching world of niche perfumery, most perfumes by the raw numbers just aren't anything I pay attention to. That, and many I see posted here or on Fragrantica all just seem to be banal. Why do I want the new ExpLOud?
 

Swoleiosis

Well-known member
Jan 10, 2020
After thinking about it, it has to be a good thing. I like to keep a small collection of naturals. Since my scope of interest is already limited to a few houses, the more options I have, the better. Even though certain houses have had their quality drop... I hope the increased revenue lets the smaller houses continue to get more convenient shipping options for the USA, get back to their past glory for some, and experiment with new ideas.
 

StylinLA

Well-known member
Aug 9, 2009
Not so much for me. Prior to finding Basenotes, I was always grabbing the newest shiny bottles.

Since starting here, I'm always about two years behind the release curve until something stands the test of time and gets some traction with a lot of folks here.
 

cazaubon

Moderator
Moderator
Basenotes Plus
Jan 1, 2005
I ignore most of them. There are a few houses I know I like, and unless I’m getting free samples or able to test in store, I don’t spend a lot of time thinking about the endless barrage of stuff. I’ve been sucked into FOMO occasionally and my blind buy success rate has been low lately, so I’m backing off.
 

chypre

Well-known member
Oct 10, 2006
I stopped taking any notice of new releases a long time ago when I realised even niche houses were putting out mediocre stuff. I might take an interest if I hear something is centred around musk or leather, but generally launches are just background noise to me.
 

cheapimitation

Well-known member
May 15, 2015
As long as Hednic keeps buying them, houses are gonna keep turning them out. :lolk:

But seriously, nothing makes me lose interest quicker in a brand than an endless barrage of mediocre releases. Give us some time to get excited about it like Malle, Chanel, and Hermes do!

I also can't help but think about the environmental impact of turning out such a large volume of crap that nobody needs. Fashion is having a similar crisis where there's just too much of everything! Unfortunately, the solution will have to be a bursting of the bubble where a whole lot of people go out of business and things level out.
 

ihxb01

Active member
Jan 26, 2020
barrage of new releases

I, for one, feel like I am in a barren wasteland this year. Four releases from Maison Dior Collection, one release from Chanel Paris - Édimbourg, a couple of Aqua Allegorias and the repackaging of old perfumes from Guerlain so far. Five designer releases H24, Phantom, CK Defy, Prada Luna Rossa Ocean and Burberry Hero. Flankers Elixir, Bleu Electrique and Ombre leather. Waiting for the new masculine Chanel like Hachikō.
 

Minotauro

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2021
But will the bubble burst? Is what I wonder ...
Because if after the COVID it does not explode, I do not know when it will ...

The "problem" that I see is that the world of perfume is the world of the intangible, of smoke.
A perfume is not a luxury car, it is not a luxury watch; it does not have that "material objectivity", so to speak.
And people are suggestible, and there is a lot of subjectivity that borders on bias, also a lot of mythomania in the houses and since the early 2000s also in relation to the "noses" themselves.

What I mean by this is that many people - for various reasons - are able to buy and continue to buy perfumes that many of us would classify as "mediocre" and feel satisfied.
And this statement may be controversial but it is not so controversial; you can interpret it the other way around: a group like us buy "mediocre" perfumes and the rest magnificent fragrances ... with this, all I am trying to say - and we will all agree- is that not all the fragrances on the market can be considered good and that there is a lot of mediocrity - regardless of the tastes -, and that many of those mediocre fragrances sell well.

And if that does not change, it is more difficult for everything to change.

And once the carrot is put in front of the rabbit, the issue is of course to obtain a higher profit; I'm going to dedicate myself to spending a lot of money studying materials, checking suppliers around the world, buying the best and most exclusive raw materials, having a real perfumer who spends months and months carrying out tests and more tests to make fragrances so exclusive and original that other brands could only dream? of course not! Besides, what happens if no one likes fragrances afterwards?

Let's spend money yes, but less, and direct said expenses in advertising, promotional campaigns, paying for publicity, for good reviews, etc etc and just sell an idea or a beautiful bottle; what's in the bottle is secondary.
And if there is any doubt or suspicion, our name will also count in our favor.
It's Chanel and it costs 80 USD, how could it be bad? It is the new Hermes perfume, look how nice blah blah blah ...

I am not an expert in mobile phones - let the wise people correct me - but you take a new iPhone and you see some improvements compared to the previous model, right?
Although maybe they are "nonsense", but perhaps the phone is lighter, the screen is somewhat large, the camera somewhat better ...
Obviously there are critical voices about it, but in general it can be said that there is.
Why? because boy, do they have to sell it somehow!

Not a perfume, and there are many examples.
I am sure that more than the 50% of basenoters - and I may be falling short - consider the original line of Les Exclusifs de Chanel (EdT) much "better" than the recent one (EdP).
And the new one is much more expensive! Ah, but it's EdP, not EdT ... ah, so ...

My biggest fear as a perfume "aficionado" is to think that the "trendy" fragrances of these years, the Bleu, Sauvage and others, will become the classic references of the past in the future, as were the first launches of some fantastic fragrances decades ago that I grew up with, like the first versions of Fahrenheit, Egoiste, Cacharel L'Homme, Jazz, etc ... and that the latter practically disappear from the minds of young people.
Since they only have as reference the Sauvage, Hero and others.
And that's lowering the bar a lot.
 

Diamondflame

Frag Bomber 1st Squadron
Basenotes Plus
Jun 28, 2009
Not really. Apart from a select few houses or favorite perfumers whom I follow, I let the FragCom sift through the chaff and cherry pick some of the survivors from the initial hype.
 

Sheik Yerbouti

oakmoss fiend
Basenotes Plus
Jul 20, 2017
No. It can be like trying to find a needle in an evergrowing haystack though. Having a jolly bunch that you can share thoughts with and whose fragrance opinions you trust can make lighter work of the task. No matter how much time passes there will always be a fragrance that pleasantly surprises you.
 

Andy the frenchy

Well-known member
Sep 16, 2018
Definitely. It is hard to keep up and a lot of mediocre and redundant stuff is flooding the market, making it harder to sift through.

Agreed. Perfumers have a certain amount of building blocks to play with, and unless big chem corps issue a valuable new aromachemical (that is once every 5 years, at most), everything will smell pretty much redundant one with the other.

Not so much for me. Prior to finding Basenotes, I was always grabbing the newest shiny bottles.

Since starting here, I'm always about two years behind the release curve until something stands the test of time and gets some traction with a lot of folks here.

Same here. Hence why I am now focusing on a few fragrances of yesteryear which have already stood the test of time, before fully checking out.
 

imm0rtelle

Well-known member
Apr 2, 2021
My biggest fear as a perfume "aficionado" is to think that the "trendy" fragrances of these years, the Bleu, Sauvage and others, will become the classic references of the past in the future, as were the first launches of some fantastic fragrances decades ago that I grew up with, like the first versions of Fahrenheit, Egoiste, Cacharel L'Homme, Jazz, etc ... and that the latter practically disappear from the minds of young people.
Since they only have as reference the Sauvage, Hero and others.
And that's lowering the bar a lot.

Fragrances are like music. The new generation thinks the old generation is dated and old. The old generation thinks the new generation's tastes are crude and unrefined trash. It is inevitable and this forum skews to the older demographic.

One thing that I find boring is how every brand is naming their bottles after ingredients. I think it might have been novel back in the 2000s, but when every brand is doing it, it gets banal.

Fifteen years later, with hundreds of collections around and almost systematically a focus on the next single material available, from countless oud woods to vetiver, I felt this direction had become a bit generic.
 

Minotauro

Well-known member
Jul 12, 2021
Fragrances are like music. The new generation thinks the old generation is dated and old. The old generation thinks the new generation's tastes are crude and unrefined trash. It is inevitable and this forum skews to the older demographic.

One thing that I find boring is how every brand is naming their bottles after ingredients. I think it might have been novel back in the 2000s, but when every brand is doing it, it gets banal.

That is a topic, and like every topic I think it has a part that is true and another part that generalizes tendentiously.
I am not talking about taste, but about the inherent quality that a fragrance has.
And this quality as a quality, in my opinion and in general, follows a downward line.

In general, I find fragrances from decades ago more interesting but I hate many of them, and on the contrary with the new releases.
I don't think anyone draws a timeline and says: on this side to the left I like everything, and on this side to the right I hate it; there are exceptions and many nuances.

On the other hand, many people think like you imm0rtelle - since it is not the first time I read something like this in recent months - and maybe you are right.
But I do not agree: in my view, it is the perfume brands that dictate the tastes and trends to their potential customers - for their own interest - and not customers who impose their tastes on brands, although it may seem otherwise (and that belief is something that brands are also interested in).

It is my opinion.

The only thing that most companies could look at when launching a fragrance is the competitors (it is only necessary to remember when perfumes with Oud or Iris became "fashionable" in the past, for example, how many brands they launched a fragrance focused on that note; or analyze face to face the bottles of Bleu de Chanel and Sauvage Dior, that dark blue that floods everything, that white writing, that use of ambroxan ... etc).

In any case and answering the thread question: I would be overwhelmed if masterpieces came out every month, but since I do not consider this to be the case and as many have already said, the only thing that produces me is indifference and some disgust.
 

imm0rtelle

Well-known member
Apr 2, 2021
I am not talking about taste, but about the inherent quality that a fragrance has.
And this quality as a quality, in my opinion and in general, follows a downward line.

I don't know too much about objective quality besides the alcohol they use. I have tried Molecule 01 dupes on eBay and their alcohol is something I would describe as lower quality. I would be curious on learning more about this for the fragrance oils.

In my view, it is the perfume brands that dictate the tastes and trends to their potential customers - for their own interest - and not customers who impose their tastes on brands, although it may seem otherwise (and that belief is something that brands are also interested in).

I think there is a lot of truth in this. But I also don't think this comes from perfumers in an ivory tower, far removed from the general population's tastes. Although branding may play a role, the juice has to resonate for the fragrance to really penetrate the zeitgeist. People denigrate Sauvage as being popular only because of Johnny Depp's face, but that's far from the truth. Johnny's face might get people interested in Sauvage, when its competing against tons of other fragrances on the market, but at the end of the day it is the juice that makes it or breaks it.

I don't understand the incremental steps that gave us Bleu de Chanel, but I'm sure if someone has smelled all masculine designer fragrances throughout the years, they will be able to piece out the history of how Bleu de Chanel came to smell like Bleu de Chanel, and how the trend has moved in the past 10 years.

I like to keep tabs on what Gen Z likes because they are our future, and I would like to be involved rather than being a dying dinosaur basking in the good old days. Unfortunately, or fortunately, nothing new in the mainstream designer landscape has really interested me. I was curious about Sauvage Elixir, but it was using this trendy aromachemical that gives me a headache. This aromachemical is also in Abercrombie & Fitch's Authentic Man. I'm always on the lookout to see which new fragrance can replace my Sauvage, Bleu de Chanel, and vintage La Nuit de l'Homme since they're more Millennial fragrances that will inevitably smell like some Gen Z girl's dad or uncle sooner or later.
 

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