All you need to know about Armani Acqua di Gio Profumo 2020 / 2021 Reformulation

FragFrog

Well-known member
Oct 6, 2018
Hello everybody,

I've read in some fragrance forums that people reported that Acqua di Gio Profumo has been reformulated and watered down in 2020 so it only lasts for about 3-4 hours...

I personally quite like AdG Profumo and think it's one of the best designer releases from the last few years.

That's why I wanted to find out what's all the fuss about and got me some brand new 2021 bottles:


AdG Profumo (6).jpg

AdG Profumo (2).jpg

AdG Profumo (3).jpg

AdG Profumo (4).jpg


The typical batch code system L'Oreal uses with those Armani fragrances (also with YSL) is:

xxRxxxx for 2018,
xxSxxxx for 2019,
xxTxxxx for 2020,
xxUxxxx for 2021...

You could also use Checkfresh to get the exact date of production if needed.

I had a 2019 bottle in use and compared it to the brand new 2021 batch.
To my surprise on the paper strip the 2019 one seemed a tiny litte bit weaker for the first 2-3 hours, then the 2021 was a tiny little bit weaker.
After 10 hours they were more or less the same.
Even after 5 days both strips still had a faint smell of AdG Profumo and if you gave me the strip of the 2021 batch for sniffing I could easily tell in a blind test that it's AdG Profumo.
So you might have guessed it: I have zero problems with the 2021 batch. It smells great and has really good longevity, projection and sillage.

The formulation code (FIL code - not the batch code) which is printed on the back of the box at the end of the ingredients list is still B170230/1 - that's the original formulation. So there wasn't any official reformulation whatsoever.

Of course batch to batch tolerances may happen with L'Oreal fragrances.
All I can say is that my particular 2021 batch performs great!

There you have it!


PS: I'd like to dedicate this thread to Eugen aka U Smells Good. :tongue: :laugh:
 

FragFrog

Well-known member
Oct 6, 2018
Cool info. Not as a big fan of this scent, but appreciate and enjoy the analysis and confirmation. :thumbsup:

Thanks!
I have to admit that I firstly didn't like it that much - it was just an "ok" fragrance for me.
But since the last 2 years it grew on me and I've worn it more often than I've thought I would.
That's why I grabbed the backup bottles because at some point it will really be reformulated and watered down.
 

FragFrog

Well-known member
Oct 6, 2018
Easily to go nose blind to this one usually is the culprit for most reformulation talk people assume your nose smells it the whole wearing some chemicals your nose fatigues easier to.

That easily could happen and more often when you're constantly wearing only this one fragrance day for day.
In this case it helps to give it a break and wear something different or even nothing for a few days to reset your nose.

But there were also some guys who said they had an older bottle and the new one was so much weaker.
Of course if there's only a little bit left in the older bottle which was used for months or even years the juice could have macerated a little bit and as some alcohol evaporated it even could have become a bit stronger. You always have to keep that in mind when comparing an older half empty bottle with a freshly opened new one.

I can only speak about my particular batch and I haven't noticed any weakness and it performs really good!
If the scent really had been gone after only 3, 4 hours I certainly would have sent it back.
 

hdbox

Well-known member
Mar 7, 2020
I just received a new 180 ml bottle of Armani Acqua di Gio Profumo from Notino. According to the code, such a batch does not exist. What could be the reason?

 

FragFrog

Well-known member
Oct 6, 2018
I just received a new 180 ml bottle of Armani Acqua di Gio Profumo from Notino. According to the code, such a batch does not exist. What could be the reason?

Who says the batch doesn't exist?

If you checked it on Checkfresh or Checkcosmetic they may not have the newest batch codes in their system which is updated manually.
The "U" batches are brand new from 2021.
 

hdbox

Well-known member
Mar 7, 2020
Although there was some delay, I still received an official response from Armani to my query:

Hello, ********,
Thank you for taking the time to contact Giorgio Armani Beauty.
Notino is our long-term, authorized partner, which officially offers the full range of our products.
Regarding your question about the specific batch code:
The product was manufactured in February 2021 (2U from the lot code). The reason you don't find the code in search engines is that most likely the new codes from 2021 (with the letter U) have not been entered yet.
We hope the information was helpful.
Regards,
The team of Giorgio Armani
 

slpfrsly

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 1, 2019
Interesting.

Long before I was a member on these boards, I noticed a trend that bigger bottles were weaker than smaller bottles.

Don't ask me 'how' or 'why'. It happened often enough, or at least I noticed it often enough, for it to be something I took in to consideration when it came to fragrances. Joop, Le Male, 1 Million...so many of my fragrances, more than I can remember, if they were mainstream designers, the bigger bottles were weaker/smelled slightly less impressive than the smaller bottles. 30-50ml were better than 100-200ml.

I can't prove this in any meaningful way. I can't even justify it. But that was my experience.

I wonder if this is still happening? And people are buying 75ml bottles, finishing them in 2-3 years, buying a larger bottle to replace it, and finding it's weaker?

Just a thought.

Also, if anyone else notices this 'thing' about bottle size, let me know, as I've never seen it mentioned before.
 

Suppressor

Well-known member
Dec 7, 2006
My sample from Decantshop was obviously not good.

Retried this recently in a shop and bought it.
This is disturbingly good.
It actually performs as a Parfum and hangs around me in a nice cloud for at least 12 hours.
Getting consistent whafts throughout the day, with just 2 sprays on my chest.

The aquatic vibe with that perfectly balanced darkness underneath is stunning, sensual and very masculine.
I don't get how Morillas managed to stretch that aquatic vibe for so many hours.

An absolute masterpiece.
Batch: December 2020
 

hdbox

Well-known member
Mar 7, 2020
In my opinion, the size of the bottle does not matter. There are the same perfumes in different cuts, in direct comparison, they are absolutely the same. However, they are produced in the same place. Besides, almost all samples and decants, which are often said to be better than the official editions, are actually filled, precisely from large bottles, because they are cheaper.
 

FragFrog

Well-known member
Oct 6, 2018
Interesting.

Long before I was a member on these boards, I noticed a trend that bigger bottles were weaker than smaller bottles.

Don't ask me 'how' or 'why'. It happened often enough, or at least I noticed it often enough, for it to be something I took in to consideration when it came to fragrances. Joop, Le Male, 1 Million...so many of my fragrances, more than I can remember, if they were mainstream designers, the bigger bottles were weaker/smelled slightly less impressive than the smaller bottles. 30-50ml were better than 100-200ml.

I can't prove this in any meaningful way. I can't even justify it. But that was my experience.

I wonder if this is still happening? And people are buying 75ml bottles, finishing them in 2-3 years, buying a larger bottle to replace it, and finding it's weaker?

Just a thought.

Also, if anyone else notices this 'thing' about bottle size, let me know, as I've never seen it mentioned before.


This could be the case, that bigger sized bottles are weaker for several reasons:

1) Normal batch to batch tolerances, so you probably just had bad luck with a particular 200 ml bottle

2) People usually don't buy the biggest size bottle from the start but a smaller one, then realize when they went through the bottle quicker than expected, that they like the fragrance and then buy a big backup bottle when the old smaller one is nearly empty. Comparing the rest of the juice of the smaller bottle (which has macerated and higher fragrance oil concentration due to the evaporated alcohol by time) will lead to the impression, that the newer bigger bottle has weaker juice in it - even when it has been the exakt same juice from the same factory tank. Everyone could experience that when buying just 2 same bottles of a particular batch and open the new one when the firstly opened one is nearly empty. I've done that.

3) Sometimes bigger bottles are from different factories. I noticed a lot of people complaining about Ultra Male being so weak nowadays. Nearly everyone of those guys had a made in Spain bottle and most (if not even all currently?) of the 200 ml bottles are made in Spain - while you can get excellent 125 ml made in France bottles with juice that lasts easily over 10 hours.

I don't think that the fragrance manufacturers fill weaker juice in 200 ml bottles than in 75 ml or 100 ml.
But I'm absolutely sure that they care about what juice is in their official samples - those little 1,2 ml sprayers in the cards.
They are indeed oftentimes better than what you get with the full bottle.

That usually doesn't apply to tester bottles as they were normally just regular batches that you can also buy.
 

FragFrog

Well-known member
Oct 6, 2018
My sample from Decantshop was obviously not good.

Retried this recently in a shop and bought it.
This is disturbingly good.
It actually performs as a Parfum and hangs around me in a nice cloud for at least 12 hours.
Getting consistent whafts throughout the day, with just 2 sprays on my chest.

The aquatic vibe with that perfectly balanced darkness underneath is stunning, sensual and very masculine.
I don't get how Morillas managed to stretch that aquatic vibe for so many hours.

An absolute masterpiece.
Batch: December 2020

That sounds great!

I also think it's one of the best current designer fragrances and a very good value for money when you buy it with discount codes.


I still need me a bottle of this.

I think so! :)
 

Shave-A-Thon

Well-known member
Nov 8, 2015
Forget the batch codes. What you all need to do is check the FORMULA code on the back of the box. For all L'Oreal brands except Ralph Lauren, it's on the first line of the ingredients. The video links below show the formula codes for the first year of release 2015 bottle and a 2020 bottle. The formula code is 560173A for that first year and that's the same formula code on my 2019 box of Acqua di Gio Profumo and the 2020 box in the video. Check your 2021 boxes and if you have the same formula code and ingredients as I do, there's been no reformulation. Here's a comparison of screen captures from the videos. Note the formula code of 560173A on both boxes.

acquadigio_profumo_codes.jpg



Feb. 2017 video with Nov. 2015 bottle:





March 2021 video with June 2020 bottle:

 
Last edited:

cheapimitation

Well-known member
May 15, 2015
Not to say it's all in your head, but it very well could be psychological. If you think about it, we often associate smaller bottles with extraits and heavy concentrations. A large bottle might give us a sense of plentifulness, that it is light and can be applied generously.

Our brains seem very susceptible to suggestion when it comes to fragrance. Think of how different something smells before you know the notes and after. I forget where I heard it, but a study was done making a minor change in the packaging with the exact same juice (a red band instead of a blue band around the bottle for example) and people would swear up and down the smell was different.

But who knows, could also be one of the factors Fragfrog mentioned.

On a related note, those tiny luckyscent vials for some reason I always feel like are concentrated precious nectar, swabbing 3 molecules worth from the little plastic dipper then being disappointed that the scent doesn't smell like much. I started decanting them into a spray and realized they are just about a single sprays worth of perfume and I never should have expected a tiny dab to give me much of a feeling about the fragrance. So the size definitely influenced the way I expected the fragrance to perform.

Interesting.

Long before I was a member on these boards, I noticed a trend that bigger bottles were weaker than smaller bottles.

Don't ask me 'how' or 'why'. It happened often enough, or at least I noticed it often enough, for it to be something I took in to consideration when it came to fragrances. Joop, Le Male, 1 Million...so many of my fragrances, more than I can remember, if they were mainstream designers, the bigger bottles were weaker/smelled slightly less impressive than the smaller bottles. 30-50ml were better than 100-200ml.

I can't prove this in any meaningful way. I can't even justify it. But that was my experience.

I wonder if this is still happening? And people are buying 75ml bottles, finishing them in 2-3 years, buying a larger bottle to replace it, and finding it's weaker?

Just a thought.

Also, if anyone else notices this 'thing' about bottle size, let me know, as I've never seen it mentioned before.
 

FragFrog

Well-known member
Oct 6, 2018
Forget the batch codes. What you all need to do is check the FORMULA code on the back of the box. For all L'Oreal brands except Ralph Lauren, it's on the first line of the ingredients. The video links below show the formula codes for the first year of release 2015 bottle and a 2020 bottle. The formula code is 560173A for that first year and that's the same formula code on my 2019 box of Acqua di Gio Profumo and the 2020 box in the video. Check your 2021 boxes and if you have the same formula code and ingredients as I do, there's been no reformulation. Here's a comparison of screen captures from the videos. Note the formula code of 560173A on both boxes.

View attachment 153352



Feb. 2017 video with Nov. 2015 bottle:





March 2021 video with June 2020 bottle:




Have you even read my first post?

This thread is about rumors that AdG Profumo was watered down in 2020.
That's why I compared a 2019 batch to a brand new 2021 batch.

In regards to formulation, as I've said:

The formulation code (FIL code - not the batch code) which is printed on the back of the box at the end of the ingredients list is still B170230/1 - that's the original formulation. So there wasn't any official reformulation whatsoever.

The number, you've pointed out here, seems to be kind of a reference code to the name of the fragrance (which probably could change with a reformulation too).
The FIL number at the end of the ingredients list is the real formulation code.

So there's no point of coming here and yelling around, Sir! :cheesy:
 

slpfrsly

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 1, 2019
Not to say it's all in your head, but it very well could be psychological. If you think about it, we often associate smaller bottles with extraits and heavy concentrations. A large bottle might give us a sense of plentifulness, that it is light and can be applied generously.

Our brains seem very susceptible to suggestion when it comes to fragrance. Think of how different something smells before you know the notes and after. I forget where I heard it, but a study was done making a minor change in the packaging with the exact same juice (a red band instead of a blue band around the bottle for example) and people would swear up and down the smell was different.

But who knows, could also be one of the factors Fragfrog mentioned.

On a related note, those tiny luckyscent vials for some reason I always feel like are concentrated precious nectar, swabbing 3 molecules worth from the little plastic dipper then being disappointed that the scent doesn't smell like much. I started decanting them into a spray and realized they are just about a single sprays worth of perfume and I never should have expected a tiny dab to give me much of a feeling about the fragrance. So the size definitely influenced the way I expected the fragrance to perform.

It's a sensible theory but much of it doesn't relate to what I perceived and why. I noticed this phenomenon at a time when I barely knew anything about fragrances, when I was in my late teens and early 20s, so the extrait logic - though it would probably apply to others - was irrelevant. I simply assumed 'bigger = better' when buying fragrance as it was the most cost effective quantity yet on numerous occasions I noticed a difference and not just when the bottle was new, either. I had different sized bottles of different fragrances for a while and there was a perceivable difference between a few different brands, scents and so on. It was enough for me to notice and care at a time when, as I say, I really didn't care about fragrance: I cared only so far as 'does it smell good, does it last'.

I also feel like official atomiser samples i.e. not decanted ones are often 'better' than the bottles, as long as they haven't gone off. Not always, a lot of the time they still smell the same, but they feel purer, stronger, less 'aromachemically' in the opening in particular.

I can't explain the bottle size phenomenon though. Only that I'm confident there's something to it and it's not just a trick of the mind.
 

FragFrog

Well-known member
Oct 6, 2018
Best you can do is to buy a few backup bottles of that particular batch of the fragrance you've just got and love.
Usually it doesn't get any better with reformulations (of course there are exceptions, I fe. like the 2019 Fahrenheit EDT more than the 2018 one).
 

Shave-A-Thon

Well-known member
Nov 8, 2015
Have you even read my first post?

This thread is about rumors that AdG Profumo was watered down in 2020.
That's why I compared a 2019 batch to a brand new 2021 batch.

In regards to formulation, as I've said:

The number, you've pointed out here, seems to be kind of a reference code to the name of the fragrance (which probably could change with a reformulation too).
The FIL number at the end of the ingredients list is the real formulation code.

So there's no point of coming here and yelling around, Sir! :cheesy:

I didn't see your post as I was sent to a later post from another thread.

In the industry F.I.L. stands for FRAGRANCE INGREDIENTS LIST. I could be wrong, but I think the internal formula code used for financial reporting on a project code basis is the code on the first line of the ingredients. I'm going to email a bunch of contacts at L'Oreal, but my guess is that the FIL # represents a change in the chemical compound ingredients which is necessitated by a change in the composition of the fragrance oil formula (which would change the code on the first line of the ingredients).

Check the comparison of Armani's "Stronger With You" from 2017 to 2019. Note the last digit of the formula code on the first line changes from a 6 to an 8 while the FIL code changes, too as do several of the compounds and the color code. I just noticed on Ralph Lauren's boxes (another L'Oreal brand), there appears to be two codes, also, but on the last line of the ingredients. Unfortunately, the fragrance business is one of the most secretive around, and getting information about codes (and discontinued fragrances) is not easy. Most reps usually aren't clued in and that's why I need to email VP's and managers.

bd6ybID.jpg
 

FragFrog

Well-known member
Oct 6, 2018
I was talking about the

ingredients list
.

The FIL number does change with an official new formulation - though I don't know if that's the case every single time when only a minor change happens within the position "Parfum/Fragrance" which probably contains 20 - 50 different fragrance oils.

Just imagine they change one of the suppliers of a certain single fragrance oil (fe. a bergamot oil for the top notes), which smells a little bit different then - I personally doubt they would change the formulation code as long as it's a similar ingredient. I've already pointed that out in another fragrance thread recently (about Dior Sauvage).

As I've said, when the FIL code changes then that's an official reformulation.

Most people don't notice it anyway - or have you ever heard someone (besides me) talking about the reformulation of Code Profumo in 2018 or the reformulation of AdG Absolu just one year after its release? Probably not.

Apart from that: Batch to batch tolerances are real, even when the manufacturers don't admit it.

Your SWY example shows that the FIL code has changed drastically - because that's a sequential number which applies to all L'Oreal fragrances.

So there's for example the FIL B213438/1 which belongs to AdG Absolu (original formulation) which was created between B197717/1 (your 2017 SWY) and B219236/1 (your 2019 SWY).
That's how many fragrance houses handle that. Dior fe. does the same.
The number at the end of the list of ingredients not only tells you whether a fragrance has been reformulated, but also, if you have several different fragrances from one house/manufacturer, which formula is the oldest and which is the newest.

I hope that clears things up a little bit.

With regard to the first number, which I consider to be a reference code to the fragrance - you would also have to see whether it differs for different bottle sizes, even if they have the same formulation, or not. I haven't looked that up as I only need the FIL number.
 

Shave-A-Thon

Well-known member
Nov 8, 2015
I was talking about the

.

The FIL number does change with an official new formulation - though I don't know if that's the case every single time when only a minor change happens within the position "Parfum/Fragrance" which probably contains 20 - 50 different fragrance oils.

Just imagine they change one of the suppliers of a certain single fragrance oil (fe. a bergamot oil for the top notes), which smells a little bit different then - I personally doubt they would change the formulation code as long as it's a similar ingredient. I've already pointed that out in another fragrance thread recently (about Dior Sauvage).

As I've said, when the FIL code changes then that's an official reformulation.

Most people don't notice it anyway - or have you ever heard someone (besides me) talking about the reformulation of Code Profumo in 2018 or the reformulation of AdG Absolu just one year after its release? Probably not.

Apart from that: Batch to batch tolerances are real, even when the manufacturers don't admit it.

Your SWY example shows that the FIL code has changed drastically - because that's a sequential number which applies to all L'Oreal fragrances.

So there's for example the FIL B213438/1 which belongs to AdG Absolu (original formulation) which was created between B197717/1 (your 2017 SWY) and B219236/1 (your 2019 SWY).
That's how many fragrance houses handle that. Dior fe. does the same.
The number at the end of the list of ingredients not only tells you whether a fragrance has been reformulated, but also, if you have several different fragrances from one house/manufacturer, which formula is the oldest and which is the newest.

I hope that clears things up a little bit.

With regard to the first number, which I consider to be a reference code to the fragrance - you would also have to see whether it differs for different bottle sizes, even if they have the same formulation, or not. I haven't looked that up as I only need the FIL number.

As I mentioned before, I have a feeling the number on the top line is used to distinguish the different formulas for internal project code budget reporting and financial statements, so I think that the first line formula code is different for different sizes. I'm beginning to think you're correct in stating that number on the last line is the dominant one for determining the formula code.

I've got to find boxes of the same size where the formula has changed, and see if all codes, especially that top one, similarly change. You're correct about the Dior codes. Other houses use numbers on the bottom flap or the back of the box that aren't near the ingredients and some precede it by "Ref".

The two problems in tracing all this down is that some YouTube reviewers only recently have gotten into showing batch codes (I've been asking them to show them during initial unboxings for years) but really don't have much knowledge about formula codes. If they did, we would know exactly what's been reformulated for nearly everything released in the last decade. In order to catch those ingredients codes, I have to download the video and run it frame by frame to see the back of the box, or run the video at 1/4 speed. I don't have the time and I'm running out of patience.

The 2nd one is when a fragrance house is sold or the license expires and is picked up by another house. For example, D&G The One being sold by P&G to Shiseido or Valentino's llcensing moving from Puig to L'Oreal. I had to return my Shiseido bottle of D&G The One EdP because it was so weak, and those that have Puig or early versions of the L'Oreal Valentino Uomo Intense version state it's stronger than the 2020 version I have. I can't compare the formulas for the two companies on each one, and I'm having a difficult time finding photos of an earlier Shiseido The One EdP and L'Oreal VUI for comparisons.

As I was writing this, I just discovered that Shiseido is terminating its deal with D&G! I know that everyone was complaining about how weak The One EdP is. I even wrote Shisiedo and asked if they wanted to test the bottle, but they told me just to return it to the major dept. store from where I bought it.

https://www.cosmeticsdesign-asia.co...bal-license-with-D-G-to-focus-on-2023-targets
 

FragFrog

Well-known member
Oct 6, 2018
The two problems in tracing all this down is that some YouTube reviewers only recently have gotten into showing batch codes (I've been asking them to show them during initial unboxings for years) but really don't have much knowledge about formula codes. If they did, we would know exactly what's been reformulated for nearly everything released in the last decade. In order to catch those ingredients codes, I have to download the video and run it frame by frame to see the back of the box, or run the video at 1/4 speed. I don't have the time and I'm running out of patience.

That is true and I have pointed it out several times, e.g. when Dior presented the DHI 2020 in new packaging and a new bottle.
Even fragrance reviewers such as Ashton aka Gents Scents, Steven aka Redolessence or Sebastian aka Smelling Great Fragrance Reviews, who all have quite a good reputation, seemed to had no idea about these formula codes. I found that remarkable, given that these people have such a profession with fragrances.


The 2nd one is when a fragrance house is sold or the license expires and is picked up by another house. For example, D&G The One being sold by P&G to Shiseido or Valentino's llcensing moving from Puig to L'Oreal. I had to return my Shiseido bottle of D&G The One EdP because it was so weak, and those that have Puig or early versions of the L'Oreal Valentino Uomo Intense version state it's stronger than the 2020 version I have. I can't compare the formulas for the two companies on each one, and I'm having a difficult time finding photos of an earlier Shiseido The One EdP and L'Oreal VUI for comparisons.

That's also correct and that's why I said "house/manufacturer", because I had that in mind, fe. what happened, when L'Oreal butchered the Valentino line.
I bought a lot of backup bottles of PUIG Valentino Uomo Intense and Acqua because it was foreseeable - and I did the same with some Prada fragrances just because I don't expect things to get better when L'Oreal takes over the production (if they do so).

I don't care about D&G The One (EdT or EdP) - but I really love the Mysterious Night flanker (should translate to "Magical Night" correctly I was told by someone who speaks Arabic) and I've got 3 big 150 ml bottles of that. Should last me for a while.


To get back to topic - my particular 2021 batch of Acqua di Gio Profumo is nice and that's why I grabbed a few extra bottles of it.
If it had really been that bad, I might have sent the bottle back, as we have a 14-day right of return for online purchases of fragrances from authorized sellers in Germany (I think that's the same in other EU countries).
 

Ken_Russell

Well-known member
Jan 21, 2006
Thank you for the info.
If and/or when personally choosing this, its performance in older or initial version (s) was from the very start one of the main attractions/selling point of this fragrance, almost on the same level with the scent also happen to like.
 

hdbox

Well-known member
Mar 7, 2020
I have noticed that in the last few weeks, the price of Acqua di Gio Profumo has risen on the sites I shop from most often. I tried to find out the reason, and came across several posts on the web, as well as videos of famous YouTubers who claim that this perfume will be discontinued, and some even say that the termination is already a fact.
Do you have any reliable information on this occasion, or are these just rumors?
 

hdbox

Well-known member
Mar 7, 2020
Maybe, it will be just a Dior-style shopping trick. It will still be for sale, but will not be as easily available as before. This scheme works great for Dior, they hid one of their best-selling products Dior Homme Parfum 75ml. Many people think that it has been discontinued, but in practice it is not. It is still sold, but only in specialized Dior boutiques located in Paris. Of course, the price is no longer what it was, until a few years ago, when Dior Homme Parfum was readily available in all physical and online stores. Now it has become a hit, at three times the price. So maybe Armani will try to do something similar with one of his best-selling items.
 

FragFrog

Well-known member
Oct 6, 2018
I've asked the customer support of L'Oreal and the lady said she wasn't sure, ask another person at the Armani department who should know - and was told that AdG Profumo is NOT discontinued.

However I also noticed that especially the 125 ml bottles are gone from the shelves at many authorized Armani sellers or at least had a big increase in price.

I even bought two more bottles a few weeks ago, when there was a nice sale at one of the authorized sellers, so I guess I'm really set now.
I don't trust L'Oreal and if they don't discontinue it they will butcher the scent at some point - like they did with La Nuit de L'Homme and many other fragrances.
 

speckmann0706

Well-known member
Mar 8, 2017
Most likely is a supply issue for right now, the YouTube reviewer that posted that they were told it was discontinued got a lot push back from it. Discontinuation is not a word to throw around lightly in the fragrance world haha, time will tell but this would be a odd one to cut since it sells decently and is quite unique in the ADG line up.
 

FragFrog

Well-known member
Oct 6, 2018
I have also wondered why Armani should discontinue AdG Profumo instead of let's say the Absolu or Absolu Instinct - that doesn't make sense.
But you know sometimes they make strange decisions and I see that they are currently trying to keep the Profondo line in the spotlight. And I wouldn't be surprised if the next one will be a Profondo EdP or Parfum - so that they also have their "blue" line of flankers like L'Oreal does it with YSL Y.
 

hdbox

Well-known member
Mar 7, 2020
According to official information, the production of the 40 ml version has already been discontinued and is not available on the official website. All other versions are currently available
 

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