ageing EOs

pavomi

Well-known member
Sep 3, 2016
how do you age EOs, like patchouli vetiver sandalwood etc.
is it recommended to keep the container airtight or open it frequently to provide some oxygen? does it need shaking? which temperature do you keep your oils for aging?

i'm having some oils ageing for quite a lot of years. it feels sort of random how this process is happening, but the vetiver (9 years ageing) is gorgeous and a complete perfume meanwhile.

all your experiences are very much appreciated, i'd like to start ageing EOs with recommendations by professionals! TIA
 

pkiler

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Dec 5, 2007
My approach is to keep them bottled tightly, never open them, never shake them, and keep them at room temp on the shelf.
 

GallupPerfume

Active member
Nov 8, 2021
What PK said. You don't want to 'add' oxygen to the bottle =oxidation, not a good thing. Also, some naturals if blended, (don't know if your planning on that) will start oxidizing because of, concider adding 0.1% of Tocopherol (Natural vitamin E) to help slow down that process.
 

birdie

Well-known member
Dec 11, 2016
I made an involuntary experiment a few years back when the cleaners turned off electricity while I was away for three months so they were stored at 30 - 35 degrees C (I live in the tropics). Nearly all of the aroma chemicals were gone, the volatile naturals too, citrus eos dilute flower absolutes etc. But some of the stuff actually got better, Labdanum, Peru balsam, Opoponax, etc. Vetiver, Patchouli and Oud (luckily) especially smelled just fantastic.
 

Darren Alan

Well-known member
Apr 20, 2019
I age my patchouli, vetiver & sandalwood with the lids off. You want them to oxidize to push the aging process forward. I cap them once a week, give them a good shake & then reopen the caps. Make sure to keep checking on them & when you feel like it's adequately ages, then store them capped. Don't do this with all essential oils. Not all EOs improve with oxidation. Don't do this with citruses or anything highly terpenic.
 

pavomi

Well-known member
Sep 3, 2016
thanks a lot for all of your opinions! quite contrary here, and it brings us somehow to the question: what is actually happening while ageing materials? is the exposure of the material to oxygen necessary or (counter)productive for achieving the effects of ageing? or is ageing just a chemical process of the material itself? would love to understand this a bit more in details, not a chemist here though.
 

GallupPerfume

Active member
Nov 8, 2021
I age my patchouli, vetiver & sandalwood with the lids off. You want them to oxidize to push the aging process forward. I cap them once a week, give them a good shake & then reopen the caps. Make sure to keep checking on them & when you feel like it's adequately ages, then store them capped. Don't do this with all essential oils. Not all EOs improve with oxidation. Don't do this with citruses or anything highly terpenic.
To accelerarate them yes? Those make sence to do that way.
 

Darren Alan

Well-known member
Apr 20, 2019
To accelerarate them yes? Those make sence to do that way.
Exactly. I'm just accelerating the aging process because some materials soften, deepen or become more complex with age. If that is what you're looking for. If someone prefers the sharper, more heady aspects of these materials, then aging them faster would be counter productive.
 

pkiler

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Dec 5, 2007
I've stated my mind. I can't recommend to induce oxidation of perfumery materials.
To my mind, leaving the cap off is not just allowing oxidation, but also to evaporate off toppy type molecules, effectively making an oxidized and fractionated EO. On one hand, might be ok, and effective to restack the scent molecular relationship to the bottom. On the other hand, it is also oxidising the EO, which is not readily my choice to do with a material. I would choose to boil or redistill to boil off the top notes that you don't want, for a short period of time, but not to oxidize it for long periods of time.

If your goal though, is oxidation, a bit of H2O2 would accomplish that quickly. But I think that that path would be seldom trod.
 

mnitabach

Well-known member
Nov 13, 2020
I've stated my mind. I can't recommend to induce oxidation of perfumery materials.
To my mind, leaving the cap off is not just allowing oxidation, but also to evaporate off toppy type molecules, effectively making an oxidized and fractionated EO. On one hand, might be ok, and effective to restack the scent molecular relationship to the bottom. On the other hand, it is also oxidising the EO, which is not readily my choice to do with a material. I would choose to boil or redistill to boil off the top notes that you don't want, for a short period of time, but not to oxidize it for long periods of time.

If your goal though, is oxidation, a bit of H2O2 would accomplish that quickly. But I think that that path would be seldom trod.

Maybe oxidation works to smooth out the rough notes of poor quality materials, so ppl get the idea that it's a generally good idea?
 

ScentAle

Well-known member
Oct 26, 2021
I have an Indian Vetiver Absolute aged 18 years that is paradisiac. Really wonderful, it's almost a perfume itself.

Also the 8 years aged Robertet Bois des Landes is really really super. Same the Hiba wood oil 11 years is so wow.

Instead i have other oils aged that with years became weird, unluckyness.
 

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