AbdesSalaam Attar / La Via del Profumo - official fragrance discussion thread

Varanis Ridari

The Scented Devil
Basenotes Plus
Oct 17, 2012
LE MAROC

Listed notes: Labdanum, Hemp, Cedarwood, Rose, Tobacco, Cumin, Carot, Coriander, Chamomile

The first thing I notice here is the hemp, then things start to move into hamster cage cedar territory, then the rest unfolds slowly. I don't have much context for the choice of name, other than knowing Le Maroc is basically the name of a kingdom in what is now modern Morocco.

Things do seem to get sweeter as time goes on, which is nice. I was worried at first that this was going to stay in hamster cage mode, but the labdanum and chamomile came out to play near the end of the first hour. Neither Rose nor tobacco is terribly evident to my nose, nor really is the cumin, but that's not a bad thing, just a sign that the blending is doing its job of merging all the seperate lucid tones into an abstract whole.

The carrot emerges much later to my nose, and the final skin glow is going to be wisps of that hemp and cedar, with a mulled spice melange underneath with a general "brown" feeling over the labdanum and chamomile. It's interesting but clearly made for someone who is really into this mixture, and I'm not that person.

Really well-blended though and blooms for hours, resisting even a good scrub. Whoever finds this combination to suit them will likely very happy for a whole day in Le Maroc.


-Moved from the other thread
 

Varanis Ridari

The Scented Devil
Basenotes Plus
Oct 17, 2012
OUD BEYOND

Listed Notes: ouds blend, musk ambergris, civet musk

This one seemed simple and straightforward animalic, so I wanted to knock it out early since I knew I wasn't in store for much development being a mostly oud/musk oil. As expected, this one is a bit urinous, a bit barnyardish, and breathy. Although, the salty marine aspects of the ambergris actually does a lot to clean up the accord here. This isn't overly fecal or fatty like civet can sometimes be, nor is it total "between the legs" like the stinkiest ouds I've encountered.

Instead, the oud punch comes first, and the civet sort of follows behind with tail tucked between legs. The ambergris seems to be the base here, with the other two riding on top. All together, this could be a base for another perfume, if you added some rose and spice, or citruses alongside some other rounding elements, like vanilla. By itself, Oud Beyond quickly becomes about the ambergris and oud to me, with the civet being more of a joiner, with it's urinous/fecal facets briding the woodiness and rot of the oud with the desiccating salt of the ambergris.

Since all three are musks, you start tuning out the muskinesss all three provide, since they become background static to the other elements of each ingredient. For a perfume that's basically animal plus animal plus rotted wood (animal), I'm surprised by how easy this is to smell. Or maybe it's because they're not contrasted with anything sweeter and cleaner to smell more challenging likes these notes are when found as parts of larger compositions? Either way, after that initial gut punch, I acclimate quickly.

Of course there could be a lot of other unlisted stuff here I'm missing, that's playing push/pull on the three musks that make up Oud Beyond. I can't comment on what I don't know is there, and if I smell blindly, I just see the oud and the ambergris mainly, with the civet playing peek-a-boo if you go looking for it. I let my BF smell this and somehow he said "grape otter pops", but he also thinks cilantro smells soapy, so I wouldn't read much into that. Our roommate though, he wrinkled his nose. He isn't ready for this level of musk and should stick to his 1 Million. 🤣


-Moved from the other thread
 

Diamondflame

Frag Bomber 1st Squadron
Basenotes Plus
Jun 28, 2009
Glad you liked it, spelling errors and all! Gotta make it feel a little loosey goosey with the errors to keep ya on your toes lol.
(That's what I'm telling myself anyway)

Appreciate the candour. 👍

Btw an autocorrect function must have been responsible to for turrning ‘musk ambrette’ into ‘musk ambergris’ in the listed notes for Oud Beyond. I’m not familiar with musk ambrette but I doubt they’d smell the same.
 

Lellabelle

Well-known member
Aug 16, 2015
(copied from the AbdesSalaam custom sampling thread)
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I decided to start with Le Maroc.

I’ll admit that when I first sniffed this one from the vial, I found it very confusing. My initial notes were of a huge blast of something intensely citric, like fizzy lime, with a funky vegetal, resinous undercurrent that made me think of ancient mummification rituals. I wisely decided to revisit it with a fresh nose. It was a good decision, and a reminder to me that 1; sometimes perfume needs a little time to rest after shipping, and 2; that naturals express their complex character differently depending on a variety of factors. Le Maroc is a scent that needs the warmth of skin to open it up. I’ve been wearing it all day, and have been enjoying it very much.

Testing: as mentioned, this one is very different on skin.
A liberal application gives a chewy amber opening. The labdanum is warm, and toffee-thick, supported by juicy tobacco and dry spices. The tobacco is the molasses-soaked kind that is smoked in a hookah. Its mouthwateringly rich and the combination with the labdanum is superb. There are spices in the background, that add to the sense of place and time. The overall impression is like Moroccan leather that you would find in a souk or bazaar. At this early stage, it’s a thick amber leather, most prominently. Cumin adds a little dirtiness, but never to the point of being sweaty. Just enough to give an authentic tanned quality to the leather.

Dry spices start to rise in prominence, with a beautiful dry smokiness exuding. 20 minutes in, this smells like incense. Myrrh specifically, with touches of frankincense and benzoin. Really lovely in this phase and I could see owning this. Reminds me a little of the lovely Mona di Orio Myrrh Casati, but warmer and much less dry.

The tobacco‘d incense phase continues into first hour. It’s like a curling tendril of pipe tobacco, in a place where incense is burning and leather goods are nearby. Leather Spice Bazaar would be a good alternate name for this! This is my favourite phase by far.

Touches of chamomile, and almost a mild hay note emerge (from the tobacco, most likely), as it enters its next phase. We are leaving the bazaar and moving outside. There’s is a slightly funky grass note (hemp, perhaps?) that accompanies this. A little vegetal dankness that plays off the warmth of the labdanum. There’s a candied oranginess that I get from Atlas cedar that is adding sweetness to the mix. There’s a familiarity to this chord. If you enjoy ambers like Ambre Sultan, or LDDM, this would be a great choice in a similar vein; however, where those are dry, verging on bitter, Le Maroc retains its humidity and its persona is distinct as a result.

Finally, the sweetness recedes and it moves to a salty labdanum. There’s a little hint of olive brine, which is occasionally how labdanum develops on my skin at high doses, before softening again to something closely resembling ambergris. It’s soft, and intimate. 10 hours in, this is still present up close. Given its suggestive nature at this point, the close wear and modest sillage is probably a good thing.

Overall, this is very well balanced and a satisfying wear. It’s more labdanum-heavy than other Scents of the Soul that I’ve tried. The ingredients and the balance are excellent, and while this has a lot in common with other scents from Salaam, there is a definite departure from his usual style. This is warmer, and raunchier, than some of his other masculines. It doesn’t have the refined herbal elegance that characterizes his masculines for me, and I think that actually opens the door for a new audience. I can see it being very popular.
 

Lellabelle

Well-known member
Aug 16, 2015
(copied from the AbdesSalaam custom sampling thread)
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Brothers in Arms. Nice herbal rose. Clean, fresh, well-balanced.

We have some Abdesalaam aficionados here, so I’ll start by saying that Brothers in Arms has the Profumo DNA. Of the samples we are testing, this one, to me, smells the most like the Salaam I am used to. There’s a woodiness I recognize from Legno di Nave (now called Sea Wood, I think), a vetiver I have encountered in Oakmoss (and others), and a rose that unfurls its pretty petals in a number of his creations, both masculine and feminine. If you’ve scented any of Salaam’s perfumes, you will immediately recognise his signature blend of herbal elegance.

So, how does it smell? Brothers in Arms is one of those deceptively simple, complex perfumes. There’s just enough going on to provide a fully-developed green, woody rose perfume, but not a drop of anything extraneous. It’s superbly well-balanced. All the listed notes are perceptible, but nothing screams for attention. Each note supports the other in a perfectly balanced house of scented cards; take any one away, and something vital would be lost, but together, they work in harmony to create an elegant, green, woody rose that manages to be neither dandified, or demanding. It’s quiet elegance is, in fact, it’s charm.

So, who would wear this? It’s a gentlemanly scent indeed. This is so finely tuned, it is begging to be worn, spritzed liberally, on a silk cravat, silver tie-pin and all. But it would just as well on a wool sweater, straight from pruning the rose garden. Sartorial choices aside, it’s a beautifully crafted scent, and would appeal to someone self-assured, and introspective. It’s refined, and quiet, and humble, with great structure and quality.
 

Varanis Ridari

The Scented Devil
Basenotes Plus
Oct 17, 2012
Appreciate the candour. 👍

Btw an autocorrect function must have been responsible to for turrning ‘musk ambrette’ into ‘musk ambergris’ in the listed notes for Oud Beyond. I’m not familiar with musk ambrette but I doubt they’d smell the same.
Maybe, but there's still a certain saltiness about Oud Beyond so my observation holds up either way. You'll have to smell it to see.
 

hoschhti

Well-known member
Nov 9, 2011
Brothers in Arms Review

At its core "Brothers in Arms" is a sharp-green, mossy and slightly smoky scent in the vein of his "Oak Moss". To be honest I never was a big fan of "Oak Moss". I find it too brutal, too one-dimensional and ultimately too boring.

"Brothers in Arms" has a similar DNA but it's more interesting and less sharp because of nice enhancements in the top- and base-notes. At the top cypress and rose add a fresh and sweet-minty note, and at the base the vetiver together with the peru balsam (I supppose) create a nutty and creamy note that smells a lot like sandalwood. Funnily enough sandalwood isn't listed but to me it smells more sandalwoody than "Oak Moss" which actually contains sandalwood. So, either that's an illusion created by the interplay by the aforementioned notes or there is actually sandalwood in it, just not listed.

"Brothers in Arms" stays very close to the skin, there's almost no projection and longevity isn't glorious either on skin, though better on fabric/hair.


Notes: cypress, rose, cedarwood, vetiver, patchouli and peru balsam
 

Diamondflame

Frag Bomber 1st Squadron
Basenotes Plus
Jun 28, 2009
From the sampling thread, here’s Mumsy’s take on Oud Beyond :

A sweet intense animalic barnyard quickly gives way to a gentle aromatic plaster infused with bread and something like dark honey. Nuances of ginger parkin like my grandmother used to make. I feel like I'm in a vast dim old wooden hall with many doors, so as I walk through, the air from the activity within each one wafts around me, then swirls together in a warm woodiness. As I walk down the hall, the earth is soft beneath my feet whilst furry animals are entwining themselves around my ankles. Their furry warmth combining with the baking coming from some of the doors, whilst one has something almost medical inside. There is a sticking plaster cleanliness nuance in the distance. The animalic funky qualities of oud are never far away but they swirl gently behind these different aroma veils as I pass each door. I sit for a while and the entwining animals are close enough to make me tickle their bellies and I am enveloped in the soft, furry chocolateness of their musky warm tummies.

The overall feeling is of a calm, warm, snuggly sort of peace. This perfume is like snuggling into the old fur coat of an ancient storyteller on a dark but starry night. Outside and with some larger animals not far away. Magical serenity in an intense, warm, sweet night.
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
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Brothers in Arms

To do this justice in a description, I'm going to have to wear it again, which I can assure you will not be a chore. It's simply blend-a-rific. The way AS uses the rose and vetiver like balancing weights on either side of the woods is sublime, and the patch is both sweet and earthy in a way that grounds and enriches the composition. This is one of those fragrances that bears the perfumer's signature. Absolutely marvelous!

*

There’s quite a bit of longevity in the late drydown stage, which settles into a warm envelope of sweet, soapy woods. No pencil shavings or scratchy WACs here! FB worthy for sure.
 
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PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
Migrated from the custom AbdesSalaam thread:

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Le Maroc

Last night, I wore Serge Lutens La Couche du Diable, which is primarily labdanum with a tinge of oud (or what passes for it) and no doubt some other uncredited ingredients that do a fine job of evading my senses. As Le Maroc lists labdanum in the primary position, I thought it might be an instructive transition.

Indeed, Le Maroc is largely, though not exclusively, about labdanum. The kicker is, AbdesSalaam, no slouch in the oud department, either doesn't include any, or includes so little that there was no room to list it after the chamomile. However, the use of hemp and cumin does a bang-up job of approximating some of the better synth-ouds in popular use, all the more so alongside rose. Our dear perfumer probably wasn't even considering that, but it still amuses me to think of him as a sly devil.

Now, as I'm not a fan of recreational hemp or its distinctive armpit aroma, the inclusion of hemp here is just a tiny bit off-putting. But, really, just a tiny bit. Le Maroc, after all, is not primarily hemp, and the blend is sophisticated enough that it's best to step far enough back (metaphorically if not literally) to place it in context.

That done, we have a warm, resinous, spicy-smoky scent that shape-shifts enough to maintain intrigue but not so much as to cause whiplash. The cedar steers the labdanum in the direction of wood resin, the tobacco makes it smokier, the rose imparts sweetness, and the spices add character to that rather than transporting us to the kitchen. Carrot and chamomile? I'm not picking them up, but AbdesSalaam never does anything gratuitous, and they're certainly not gumming up the works.

Fine stuff for fall/winter weather!

*
 

PStoller

I’m not old, I’m vintage.
Basenotes Plus
Aug 1, 2019
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Oud Beyond

To adequately review this, it would be helpful to be more of an oud aficionado than I currently am. (I like it just fine, but I haven't experienced enough ouds to say where this falls in the range.) I can say that what AbdesSalaam has achieved here is a warm-and-fuzzy oud, buttressed by the musk, sharper at the onset than in the drydown. It's an easy wear for me, and more dimensional than, say, a Tom Ford "oud," if less exciting than I recall the Oud Caravan series being. While there's question that it's high in quality, it's not my first choice for a FB—though not my last, either.
 
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hoschhti

Well-known member
Nov 9, 2011
Has anyone had a chance to try any of fragrances that are part of Parfumetherapy? Honey bee looks really interesting and so does Benzoin.

These are basically essential oils diluted in alcohol to make them wearable as perfumes. They are of high quality but being a single note they lack the complexity of his proper perfumes. It's a good way to find out how certain materials smell like, or if you want to wear a single note that you are a fan of, like sandalwood for example.
 
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hoschhti

Well-known member
Nov 9, 2011
There's a new perfume with a rather controversial name:


I don't think it's a wise move to name a perfume like that. I don't mind a bit of controversy, a bit of provoking, but reading the word "Taliban" on a perfume bottle just feels so wrong in my opinion.
 
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Profumo

Well-known member
Jun 26, 2006
There's a new perfume with a rather controversial name:

I don't think it's a wise move to name a perfume like that. I don't mind a bit of controversy, a bit of provoking, but reading the word "Taliban" on a perfume bottle just feels so wrong in my opinion.
Yes. You are right.
This is why this perfume is on a secret page.
it is not reachable from anywhere on the site except from the internal search engine, by typing its name in the search window.
It means that only those who already know that it exists can reach it.
Now my secret page is a bit blown up.
Practically Hoschhti, you did the launch of the perfume.
I am looking for one old picture of me in Afghanistan in the seventies. I shall upload it there. As I did for Oud Beyond.
Salaam
 

Profumo

Well-known member
Jun 26, 2006
If there is, it is enough to type the name in the internal search Engine box.
However there is not, because the perfume "A Dream" is a secret that does not belong to me.
 
Dec 23, 2017
Thanks for the generous black friday coupon! Been wanting to try a few samples for some time but the delivery price wasn't cost-effective for my fairly small order. I just placed an order as the BF coupon covered the delivery cost which is more expensive (€22.00) for my EU country than it is for the more distant USA.
 

Diamondflame

Frag Bomber 1st Squadron
Basenotes Plus
Jun 28, 2009
Maybe, but there's still a certain saltiness about Oud Beyond so my observation holds up either way. You'll have to smell it to see.
Yes. I noticed that facet too.
after reading this thread and perfume reviews I decided to go and place an order from AbdesSalaam. I went with Tabac, Sharif and Oud Beyond as my first purchase. can't wait to put my nose on them! :)
Great selection! I have finished Tabac, still enjoying Sharif and only recently was lucky enough to try Oud Beyond. They are all excellent.
 

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