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Understanding "blenders" in The Good Scents Company entries

flavor

New member
Mar 3, 2021
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Hi all! I am brand new to the world of perfume, and have a quick basic question for anyone who is familiar with The Good Scents Company database. I have been browsing their page and noticed that in many pages associated with a material, there is a section for "Blenders." Underneath Blenders is a list of descriptors, and under each descriptor a list of other compounds, which I suppose are supposed to be the "Blenders."

As an example, please see this entry on Vanillin: http://www.thegoodscentscompany.com/data/rw1011712.html#toblndr

What is meant by blender in this scenario? For instance, cyclohexyl acetic acid is listed under the category "acidic" with the tag "FL/FR." Is it correct to interpret this as meaning that when vanillin is paired with cyclohexyl acetic acid, the flavor or fragrance can be expected to be described as "acidic"? Or is this an incorrect understanding?

Thank you for any help you may be able to provide!

Nate
 

Bill Roberts

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Mar 1, 2013
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Ordinarily when having absolutely no idea, I figure no reason for me to reply and don't, but this morning I didn't want it to seem your question was ignored.

I have seen this for years and have had no idea, ever. I can't recall ever seeing anyone say they use this.

I have assumed, but don't know, that it comes from some theory of Bill Luebke (it is his site) but I don't think it is a theory anyone uses.

Broadly, on your question, at the least the items under each category are of that category themselves, and combinations with vanillin would likely carry over some or all of that quality. But whether they are choices one really should particularly consider, to me, no.

Perhaps someone does use these and can explain a benefit.
 

Darren Alan

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Apr 20, 2019
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I'm so glad you asked this! I've been studying & practicing perfumery for over 20 years and to be honest I have wondered this same thing for years.

From my training & experience, I've come to understand blenders to be materials that act as a "bridge" to fill a gap between the scent profiles of different materials or olfactory characteristics in a fragrance so that there is a smoother transition between notes when the perfume is unfolding. But they are not main players in that they do not introduce a new scent profile of their own into the formula, but act to smooth out the transitions between the main notes. But I'm not sure if that's what Bill intended when he created the lists of blenders. So instead of guessing, I just emailed him to ask how he suggests we use the possible blenders in his database. I figured why guess when we can go to the source? Lol

I will post his reply when I hear back from him & thank you so for asking this question. It's so odd how a very basic question like this can go unanswered for so long (for me at least), so hopefully soon there will be clarity....


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flavor

New member
Mar 3, 2021
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Thank you Bill and Darren for your thoughtful responses :thumbsup: Here's to hoping we can find the answer! Personally, I have had a hard time getting in touch with the operators of TGSC and understand they have been hard to reach for some time. Of course, I am amazed with the thought and care that clearly went into the design of their database, so surely their justification should be enlightening.
 

pkiler

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Dec 5, 2007
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"Blenders" is used here to describe how to think about a molecule that doesn't have a big odor impact, or very distinctive odor ID or prominence.

I don't like the term, because I view the thought as being essentially immature in your understanding about raw materials. "I dont understand it or how to use it, so I'm gonna put it in the 'I don't know box' ".

Using the term blenders just tells me that that person doesn't yet understand the nature of that material and how to use it yet. They have not accepted these materials for what they are, and learned how, where, and why to use them.

Using the term also tells me that this person also has only so far experienced a small limited range of materials, and assumes that every material should fit into presupposed and self constructed boxes of organizational thought and expectation.
 

Darren Alan

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Apr 20, 2019
465
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I don't like the term, because I view the thought as being essentially immature in your understanding about raw materials. "I dont understand it or how to use it, so I'm gonna put it in the 'I don't know box' "..
I agree Paul. Another problem with this way of thinking is that every material could act in this capacity depending on what else is in the formula. It's like an artist saying that yellow is a blender color. Which it might be in some circumstances, but then not in others. At least that's my understanding of what the website means by blenders? But I could be wrong. But then it also makes me wonder that by relying too much on categories & lists, does that limit ones creativity? I know that one of the best teachers for me was experimenting with what materials work well with others & how one material can bring out different facets or nuances of the other ingredients in the formula. Sometimes you just have to try it & see [emoji2373]


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WitchingWell

New member
Aug 29, 2020
204
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I've always seen this as a suggestion for fragrance materials or flavors that will go with that chemical. For example, in the floral category, Jasmine absolute goes with banana fragrance. Whether blenders make a certain change depends on how much you use. I think it's just a suggestion to flavorists and perfumes as to what chemicals compliment it well.
 

_delayed

New member
Jan 11, 2023
24
3
I'm so glad you asked this! I've been studying & practicing perfumery for over 20 years and to be honest I have wondered this same thing for years.

From my training & experience, I've come to understand blenders to be materials that act as a "bridge" to fill a gap between the scent profiles of different materials or olfactory characteristics in a fragrance so that there is a smoother transition between notes when the perfume is unfolding. But they are not main players in that they do not introduce a new scent profile of their own into the formula, but act to smooth out the transitions between the main notes. But I'm not sure if that's what Bill intended when he created the lists of blenders. So instead of guessing, I just emailed him to ask how he suggests we use the possible blenders in his database. I figured why guess when we can go to the source? Lol

I will post his reply when I hear back from him & thank you so for asking this question. It's so odd how a very basic question like this can go unanswered for so long (for me at least), so hopefully soon there will be clarity....


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Curious if you ever received an answer...
 

parker25mv

Well-known member
Oct 12, 2016
2,709
620
I would strongly guess that "blenders" are a list of other ACs that particular AC "blends" especially well with. Things that could compliment it in a formula.
 

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