• We're half back! There's a lot missing, but you can find out more here,

    You are now able to log into the forums and post

NEW: La Collection Celine Haute Parfumerie

Minotauro

New member
Jul 12, 2021
199
281
I wasn't expecting much from Rimbaud's release, but the official notes really stump me.
They make me wonder: what is the idea behind calling a fragrance "Rimbaud"?

Rimbaud has always been one of the figures in literature that fascinates me the most; I have tried to read everything I have found about him. I think that the biography of Graham Robb is, despite some controversial interpretations and opinions in its final chapters (Africa), magnificent.
But it is normal, we are talking about the homme des semelles de vent, the man with the wind soles; most of his life is covered by an enigmatic uncertainty - is part of his charm - and this increases during the last years of his.

I am unaware of Slimane's knowledge of Rimbaud; I suppose that he will be very influenced by the countercultural movements, beat movements and others that in the 60s "consecrated" Rimbaud as one of his icons. In any case, this still doesn't make sense to me.

Rimbaud, the vagabond, the adolescent possessed by Poe's The Imp of the Pervers, a genius of language and visions, capable of cultivating a swarm of lice in his mane to throw them at priests when they passed by. The friend capable of stabbing to his best friend or to empty his pipe into the nostrils of a horse for almost the mere fact of experiencing it. A pale figure that remained for hours in the semi-darkness suspecting his "season in hell" cradled by the effects of absinthe and from hashish. The man who forgot his homeland and his genius and went to Africa to be another... he suddenly becomes a bourgeois.

Lavender, musk, orris butter, vanilla, neroli ... 80% of the Celine line shares practically the same orris butter-vanilla-musk base.
"It is one of the hallmarks of the brand image" - some will say. As if launching fragrances with the same base was that, and launching them with totally different bases was not.
"Economy of means" - I would say.

And next to it, lavender and delicious floral notes.

Lavender. You cannot be more French, conservative and bourgeois. Caron pour Homme.

Yesterday I read a review of Rimbaud from a friend: an Eau Noire, clean, crystalline, ethereal.
Lavender-iris and luscious transparent floral notes; similarities with Chanel Jersey.
More Slimbaud than Rimbaud.
Rimbaud, the holy poet. The eternal adolescent. The virgin.
The transvestism of a figure with shameless chrematistic purposes. Again.
Sigh.
 

cheapimitation

Well-known member
May 15, 2015
2,498
2,972

imm0rtelle

New member
Apr 2, 2021
1,071
845
They make me wonder: what is the idea behind calling a fragrance "Rimbaud"?
Based on what I've read so far, it seems like Rimbaud represents an idea that Hedi wants to capture: youth, fragility, and spleen. I think it speaks to Hedi's obsession towards youth stemming all the way back to his childhood obsession with Rimbaud. I think it fits neatly into his bourgeoisie narrative for Celine, and he has referenced the Sorbonne, Baudelaire, and Huysman before for Parade. I think this whole emphasis on literature makes a lot more sense as part of Celine than at Saint Laurent.
Rimbaud has always been one of the figures in literature that fascinates me the most; I have tried to read everything I have found about him. I think that the biography of Graham Robb is, despite some controversial interpretations and opinions in its final chapters (Africa), magnificent.
But it is normal, we are talking about the homme des semelles de vent, the man with the wind soles; most of his life is covered by an enigmatic uncertainty - is part of his charm - and this increases during the last years of his.
I'm almost 100% positive that Hedi doesn't want to associate Celine with how Rimbaud actually lived his life. I'm almost sure he wanted to capture specifically this idealized image of Rimbaud:
unknown.png


I mean creative directors do this all the time. Talking about their travels, or people dear to them. The particularly facets of Rimbaud that attract Hedi, act as a source of inspiration for his fragrance, Rimbaud.
I REMEMBER THAT PICTURE OF RIMBAUD WHICH I KEPT WITH ME RELIGIOUSLY. I HAVE ALWAYS WANTED TO CREATE A PERFUME THAT EVOKES UTOPIA, THE VERY ESSENCE OF YOUTH, ILLUSTRATING THAT PICTURE OF RIMBAUD, OR THE PHOTOS OF THOUSANDS OF YOUNG MEN AND WOMEN I HAVE MADE OVER THE LAST 30 YE ARS. A GENTLE AND IMPERCEPTIBLE VEIL OF SCENT, PERHAPS THE ONE IN THE PORTRAIT OF THE YOUNG POET, STILL AN ADOLESCENT, BUT BURNISHED BY THE YEARS AND THE EYES OF GENERATIONS FASCINATED BY HIS MELANCHOLY GRACE.
Seems to me this is a fragrance that evokes the feeling that Rimbaud's portrait gives to Hedi, which are feelings of utopia, essence of youth, gentleness, and melancholy grace.

Rimbaud, the vagabond, the adolescent possessed by Poe's The Imp of the Pervers, a genius of language and visions, capable of cultivating a swarm of lice in his mane to throw them at priests when they passed by. The friend capable of stabbing to his best friend or to empty his pipe into the nostrils of a horse for almost the mere fact of experiencing it. A pale figure that remained for hours in the semi-darkness suspecting his "season in hell" cradled by the effects of absinthe and from hashish. The man who forgot his homeland and his genius and went to Africa to be another... he suddenly becomes a bourgeois.
All of this just sounds disgusting, and doesn't seem to be how Hedi describes Rimbaud. I empathize with how you feel like a fragrance called Rimbaud should capture the entirety of Rimbaud. I would disagree with that, and I think capturing just a facet of him is enough.
Lavender, musk, orris butter, vanilla, neroli ... 80% of the Celine line shares practically the same orris butter-vanilla-musk base.
"It is one of the hallmarks of the brand image" - some will say. As if launching fragrances with the same base was that, and launching them with totally different bases was not.
"Economy of means" - I would say.
To me, notes are merely marketing and don't truly reflect how the fragrances actually smell. If you blindfolded me, I would be able to differentiate all 9 fragrances from each other. They all do share a similar aesthetic though, and I think that's the hallmark of a strong brand. I think it would be disingenuous for a brand to just release fragrances that smell like it could have come from another brand. Perhaps I can see a similarity between the base of Black Tie and Dans Paris in the very late dry down, but beyond that the fragrances don't really smell the same.
 

Minotauro

New member
Jul 12, 2021
199
281
My initial discouragement has prevented me from sharing the full opinion of someone who has tried it; here I leave his basic impressions for those interested.

"Lavender-crystal.
In the same league as lavender soliflowers like Caron Pour un Homme, Brin De Reglisse n Hermes and Chanel Jersey.
In Rimbaud we find exactly this same lavender-iris pattern as in Eau Noire but here with much more finesse and transparency.
I think of Jersey, because they are quite close, but Rimbaud is, clearer, more crystalline.

The iris naturally glides over a fine lavender with accents of fresh thyme, red berries and fresh flowers, the light wood notes naturally push it towards a background that is covered in tonka bean and vanilla, the signature found in many of the brand fragrances.
The print is delicately powdery smooth and remarkably fine. "
 

imm0rtelle

New member
Apr 2, 2021
1,071
845
My initial discouragement has prevented me from sharing the full opinion of someone who has tried it; here I leave his basic impressions for those interested.

"Lavender-crystal.
In the same league as lavender soliflowers like Caron Pour un Homme, Brin De Reglisse n Hermes and Chanel Jersey.
In Rimbaud we find exactly this same lavender-iris pattern as in Eau Noire but here with much more finesse and transparency.
I think of Jersey, because they are quite close, but Rimbaud is, clearer, more crystalline.

The iris naturally glides over a fine lavender with accents of fresh thyme, red berries and fresh flowers, the light wood notes naturally push it towards a background that is covered in tonka bean and vanilla, the signature found in many of the brand fragrances.
The print is delicately powdery smooth and remarkably fine. "
Thanks for sharing. Seems like most reviews are in French due to it being launched there first.


Rimbaud: Crystal-Lavender

In Eau Noire, Hedi had already explored his affection for lavender, but through a hot and dry prism, the latter being supported by immortelle and cistus, and always accompanied by an iris frame. In Rimbaud, we find exactly this same lavender-iris frame, but here it is worked with great finesse and transparency, all in elegance. I think of Jersey, because they are quite close, but Rimbaud is clearer, more limpid, more crystalline. The iris slides naturally over a fine lavender with accents of fresh thyme, red fruits and fresh flowers, notes of light wood draw it naturally towards a base which is draped in tonka bean and vanilla, the signature that we found in many of the brand's fragrances. The print is delicately powdery, soft and remarkably fine. Wanting to combine the spirit of youth and the nostalgia of the poet, Rimbaud propels one of the most traditional raw materials into a very contemporary universe with an elegance, finesse and lightness that I find dazzling.
I never noticed iris or orris butter in Eau Noire. I'll see if I pick anything up next time I wear it.
 

Folkwinds

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Jan 30, 2019
869
989
If the texture is any bit reminiscent of Le Peau Nue..I’ll love it.

That’s the only bottle of LVHM perfume that I’ve ever purchased...
 

cheapimitation

Well-known member
May 15, 2015
2,498
2,972
I asked my friend who works at the Madison Ave boutique, and they don't have Rimbaud nor the candles in yet. I wonder when they will make it to the U.S.
 

Minotauro

New member
Jul 12, 2021
199
281
Simply a comment about the word spleen; I do not want to look like a smart ass but I will risk looking like it if this serves so that some reader of this thread to avoid confusion.
The word spleen here is used in Baudelerian terms, one might say, a term/mood used by Charles Baudelaire.
I leave a link as a tiny reference.
https://niklasblog.com/?p=20851
 

wilfred

Well-known member
Jan 13, 2016
2,974
418
Simply a comment about the word spleen; I do not want to look like a smart ass but I will risk looking like it if this serves so that some reader of this thread to avoid confusion.
The word spleen here is used in Baudelerian terms, one might say, a term/mood used by Charles Baudelaire.
I leave a link as a tiny reference.
https://niklasblog.com/?p=20851
well now it makes some sort of sense. but you know how these brands can be with throwing things out there just to sound fancy or abstract.
 

imm0rtelle

New member
Apr 2, 2021
1,071
845
Simply a comment about the word spleen; I do not want to look like a smart ass but I will risk looking like it if this serves so that some reader of this thread to avoid confusion.
The word spleen here is used in Baudelerian terms, one might say, a term/mood used by Charles Baudelaire.
I leave a link as a tiny reference.
https://niklasblog.com/?p=20851
I think you're 100% right here, and the only people who would consider you a smart ass are those who are hugely insecure themselves.

“melancholy with no apparent cause, characterised by a disgust with everything”
Spleen sounds like a more poetic version of teen age angst, rebellion, or insouciance.

This is what spleen looks like in Hedi's Celine universe:

Her eyes, the way she looks you up and down.
 

imm0rtelle

New member
Apr 2, 2021
1,071
845
I asked my friend who works at the Madison Ave boutique, and they don't have Rimbaud nor the candles in yet. I wonder when they will make it to the U.S.
Supposedly Rimbaud will be available Jan. 21. I wonder how early the stores get the fragrances before they're allowed to sell them. Maybe a week in advance? Just in time for Lunar New Year which is on Feb. 1st this year.
 

Nom de Guerre

Well-known member
Jan 2, 2020
1,852
5,397
Simply a comment about the word spleen; I do not want to look like a smart ass but I will risk looking like it if this serves so that some reader of this thread to avoid confusion.
The word spleen here is used in Baudelerian terms, one might say, a term/mood used by Charles Baudelaire.
I leave a link as a tiny reference.
https://niklasblog.com/?p=20851

I was close with my bad wording. On purpose, of course – to not sound like a smart ass 😂
 
Last edited:

hednic

Well-known member
Oct 25, 2007
388,049
41,071
Received my Rimbaud 100ml bottle from Paris today as expected. Just opened the package an hour ago and sprayed it on the back of my hand to get a quick sniff. It smells wonderful. Will be my SOTD tomorrow. A nice lavender-iris mix, and not as powdery as I thought which is great. I'll have a better feel tomorrow afternoon after having worn it for a few hours., but first impression is very positive.
 

cheapimitation

Well-known member
May 15, 2015
2,498
2,972
Received my Rimbaud 100ml bottle from Paris today as expected. Just opened the package an hour ago and sprayed it on the back of my hand to get a quick sniff. It smells wonderful. Will be my SOTD tomorrow. A nice lavender-iris mix, and not as powdery as I thought which is great. I'll have a better feel tomorrow afternoon after having worn it for a few hours., but first impression is very positive.
Does it smell anything like Eau Noire? I just wore my original bottle of Eau Noire today and ya know what, it's not that great! Actually too spicy for me. It brings back memories so I would never sell it, but an updated take on lavender under Hedi's direction would be welcome! Not to mention I'm almost certain FK is making these too.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
267,048
Messages
5,063,751
Members
205,364
Latest member
msave7491
Top