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Key Accords of famous fragrances

NonConformist

New member
Feb 12, 2019
16
1
Hi.

Does anybody know where I can find the key accords of famous fragrances? Or could we collect them? :wink:

Examples:

Fahrenheit: Dihydro Myrcenol / Iso E Super 1:5 (as far as I know about 50% of the fragrance)
Tresor: Hedione / Iso E Super / Methyl Ionone / Galaxolide 1:1:1:1
 

pkiler

Basenotes Plus
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Dec 5, 2007
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Hi.

Does anybody know where I can find the key accords of famous fragrances? Or could we collect them? :wink:

Examples:

Fahrenheit: Dihydro Myrcenol / Iso E Super 1:5 (as far as I know about 50% of the fragrance)
That's not really the "MAGIC SECRET" of Fahrenheit.
And the ratio is incorrect.
Fahrenheit is 1.22% DHM and 21.47% Iso E Super.
And the real impact of it is not the DHM, anyway.
 

Septime

Active member
May 31, 2018
321
121
Define 'famous'?

Most of these come from Philip Kraft or Calkin & Jellinek and the rest from hear-say. I will skip fragrances that are mostly one ingredient (e.g. Kiehl's Musk = 93% Galaxolide) unless asked.

Diptyque Tam Dao = 40% Iso E Super; 17% sandalwood oil; 7.5% cedarwood oil Texas = 64.5% of the concentrate

Annick Goutal La Violette = 5 alpha-iso-methyl ionone : 2 beta-ionone = 67%

Nina Ricci L'Air du Temps = 9 benzyl salicylate : 2 eugenol = 18% of the concentrate; you also need isoeugenol + ylang ylang (or Oilette 208 base if you can reconstruct it, maybe it's somewhere in Appell?) and a high dose of a musk ambrette substitute

Chanel Sycomore = 1 vetiver oil : 1 Timbersilk = most of the concentrate allegedly

Dior Diorella = 10% Hedione : 5% Helional : ?% eugenol (however much balances with those two), plus 6% patchouli and 2% cis-jasmone

Guerlain Shalimar = 30% bergamot; 9% coumarin; 4% patchouli; 3% ethyl vanillin; trace civet and castoreum

Other things in Fahrenheit aside from what you've mentioned: 11% Tonalide/Fixolide, 0.6% of methyl heptine carbonate/Folione (can substitute Violettyne or Neofolione), methyl octine carbonate (can substitute this stuff), alpha-iso-methyl ionone, coumarin, and a leather element. The MHC&MOC + leather + methyl ionone form the 'key accord' of violets + gasoline.
 
D

Deleted member 13385235

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Always interested to hear what goes on in Fahrenheit, thanks.
 

pkiler

Basenotes Plus
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Dec 5, 2007
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Only 21% iso e super?

According to the gc I have in hand for reference. And I don't know the vintage of the perfume, AND, the gc was performed at PA.

There's a lot of variables there... I still have my original 1984 bottle, if we want to get original issue Fahrenheit tested at a better venue.
 

NonConformist

New member
Feb 12, 2019
16
1
That's what I meant. Thank you very much. :tekst-toppie:

I don't want to copy famous fragrances, but I think it's good for inspiration. Especially for beginners. :wink:

Define 'famous'?

Most of these come from Philip Kraft or Calkin & Jellinek and the rest from hear-say. I will skip fragrances that are mostly one ingredient (e.g. Kiehl's Musk = 93% Galaxolide) unless asked.

Diptyque Tam Dao = 40% Iso E Super; 17% sandalwood oil; 7.5% cedarwood oil Texas = 64.5% of the concentrate

Annick Goutal La Violette = 5 alpha-iso-methyl ionone : 2 beta-ionone = 67%

Nina Ricci L'Air du Temps = 9 benzyl salicylate : 2 eugenol = 18% of the concentrate; you also need isoeugenol + ylang ylang (or Oilette 208 base if you can reconstruct it, maybe it's somewhere in Appell?) and a high dose of a musk ambrette substitute

Chanel Sycomore = 1 vetiver oil : 1 Timbersilk = most of the concentrate allegedly

Dior Diorella = 10% Hedione : 5% Helional : ?% eugenol (however much balances with those two), plus 6% patchouli and 2% cis-jasmone

Guerlain Shalimar = 30% bergamot; 9% coumarin; 4% patchouli; 3% ethyl vanillin; trace civet and castoreum

Other things in Fahrenheit aside from what you've mentioned: 11% Tonalide/Fixolide, 0.6% of methyl heptine carbonate/Folione (can substitute Violettyne or Neofolione), methyl octine carbonate (can substitute this stuff), alpha-iso-methyl ionone, coumarin, and a leather element. The MHC&MOC + leather + methyl ionone form the 'key accord' of violets + gasoline.
 

Emanuel76

Well-known member
Jun 16, 2018
3,565
1,030
More, please! 😋

Define 'famous'?

Most of these come from Philip Kraft or Calkin & Jellinek and the rest from hear-say. I will skip fragrances that are mostly one ingredient (e.g. Kiehl's Musk = 93% Galaxolide) unless asked.

Diptyque Tam Dao = 40% Iso E Super; 17% sandalwood oil; 7.5% cedarwood oil Texas = 64.5% of the concentrate

Annick Goutal La Violette = 5 alpha-iso-methyl ionone : 2 beta-ionone = 67%

Nina Ricci L'Air du Temps = 9 benzyl salicylate : 2 eugenol = 18% of the concentrate; you also need isoeugenol + ylang ylang (or Oilette 208 base if you can reconstruct it, maybe it's somewhere in Appell?) and a high dose of a musk ambrette substitute

Chanel Sycomore = 1 vetiver oil : 1 Timbersilk = most of the concentrate allegedly

Dior Diorella = 10% Hedione : 5% Helional : ?% eugenol (however much balances with those two), plus 6% patchouli and 2% cis-jasmone

Guerlain Shalimar = 30% bergamot; 9% coumarin; 4% patchouli; 3% ethyl vanillin; trace civet and castoreum

Other things in Fahrenheit aside from what you've mentioned: 11% Tonalide/Fixolide, 0.6% of methyl heptine carbonate/Folione (can substitute Violettyne or Neofolione), methyl octine carbonate (can substitute this stuff), alpha-iso-methyl ionone, coumarin, and a leather element. The MHC&MOC + leather + methyl ionone form the 'key accord' of violets + gasoline.
 

jsweet

Active member
Sep 16, 2021
286
221
Yeah the problem Paul highlighted is that the components that confer the signature effect of a fragrance are often trace components. In Fahrenheit, methyl octine carbonate / methyl heptine carbonate and indole are indispensable, and I think lyral contributes more to the blend than iso e super or dhm. If only it were so simple.
 
Last edited:

Hedione HC

New member
Jan 18, 2023
104
78
Most likely general knowledge already:
Cool Water (Davidoff, 1988): Dihydromyrcenol, Precyclemone B, Calone, Lyral, Ambroxan
 

Emanuel76

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Jun 16, 2018
3,565
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Yeah the problem Paul highlighted is that the components that confer the signature effect of a fragrance are often trace components. In Fahrenheit, methyl octine carbonate / methyl heptine carbonate and indole are indispensable, and I think lyral contributes more to the blend than iso e super or dhm. If only it were so simple.
I don't particularly care about copying Tresor, for example. But I'm definitely interested in playing with the Grojsman accord from Tresor.
I won't even use the Grojsman accord as it is. I'll replace Iso E Super and Galaxolide anyway. But it is a good starting point and inspiration.

If you have other such accords, please share.
 

jsweet

Active member
Sep 16, 2021
286
221
I think that this thread was asking for simplified versions of fragrances that exist on the market. I don't care to rehash the debates of what makes an accord vs a base etc, but my point above is that the smell of most fine fragrances on the market cannot be simplified to 4 or 5 materials. Besides Grojsman, the basic accords to learn aren't simplified commercial fragrance, but rather fragrance families: fougere, chypre, amber, cologne, etc. I can give you some skeletons of each of those accords, but ask me tomorrow and the suggested materials and ratios would be different.
 

jsweet

Active member
Sep 16, 2021
286
221
That was just to say that the precise components and ratios of the classic perfumery accords are not set in stone and that whatever I give you will not be any sort of definitive or conclusive accord. But for fun here are some 4-6 material fragrance family accords to play with.

Fougere: lavandin (5%-15%), geranium eo (1%-5%), coumarin (2%-8%), amyl salicylate (1%-6%), hedione (5%-10%), tonalid (1%-5%)
Amber: bergamot (10%-25%), vanillin (0.5%-3%), ethyl vanillin (2%-4%), labdanum resinoid (0.5%-4%), rose abs (1%-5%), jasmine base (0.5%-2.5%)
Cologne: lemon (10%-20%), bergamot (5%-15%), bitter orange (1%-6%), petitgrain (1%-7%), cis 3 hexenol (0.05%-0.5%), basil (0.2%-1%)

The problem with offering accords should be apparent here. These are subjective, each of these materials could be replaced by dozens of others to interesting effect while staying within the fragrance family, and even percentage ranges place artificial limits on the possibilities. The point is to make the type of fougere or the type of cologne that you want to smell, through trial and error.
 

mnitabach

Basenotes Plus
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Nov 13, 2020
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That was just to say that the precise components and ratios of the classic perfumery accords are not set in stone and that whatever I give you will not be any sort of definitive or conclusive accord. But for fun here are some 4-6 material fragrance family accords to play with.

Fougere: lavandin (5%-15%), geranium eo (1%-5%), coumarin (2%-8%), amyl salicylate (1%-6%), hedione (5%-10%), tonalid (1%-5%)
Amber: bergamot (10%-25%), vanillin (0.5%-3%), ethyl vanillin (2%-4%), labdanum resinoid (0.5%-4%), rose abs (1%-5%), jasmine base (0.5%-2.5%)
Cologne: lemon (10%-20%), bergamot (5%-15%), bitter orange (1%-6%), petitgrain (1%-7%), cis 3 hexenol (0.05%-0.5%), basil (0.2%-1%)

The problem with offering accords should be apparent here. These are subjective, each of these materials could be replaced by dozens of others to interesting effect while staying within the fragrance family, and even percentage ranges place artificial limits on the possibilities. The point is to make the type of fougere or the type of cologne that you want to smell, through trial and error.
In my understanding, the fougère accord absolutely requires mossy and/or woody/ambery effects. In particular, the interplay of mossy/woody/ambery with amyl/isoamyl salicylate effects is foundational.
 

jsweet

Active member
Sep 16, 2021
286
221
In my understanding, the fougère accord absolutely requires mossy and/or woody/ambery effects. In particular, the interplay of mossy/woody/ambery with amyl/isoamyl salicylate effects is foundational.
This proves the point I was making. There is not a single set of components that make up any of these families. You also didn't bring up citrus, specifically bergamot, which some would say is essential to a fougere.
 

Alex F.

Well-known member
Nov 29, 2019
1,028
1,682
One of the interesting aspects of perfumery is experimenting with different variations of accords, i.e. finding out which combinations of materials still produce a similar type of accord.
Notes aren't popular on here because they are vague, but it's been my experience that, in the context of accords, they can be more useful than single-material combinations, because they illustrate the flexibility that many (if not all) accords allow for.
I think I've recommended Sylvaine Delacourte's (former creative director at Guerlain) website a couple of times before when questions about accords came up: https://www.sylvaine-delacourte.com/en/guide/the-composition-of-the-perfume
I think it's very useful, but you'll need some background knowledge and shouldn't take it too literally.
 

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