• We're half back! There's a lot missing, but you can find out more here,

    You are now able to log into the forums and post

Is there a difference between myrhh and Opoponax, can you smell the difference?

Bigsly

New member
Feb 20, 2008
16,489
42
I think of vintage Lagerfeld Cologne as my "reference opoponax." To me it is distinct, and few other scents have anywhere near as much as LC, so I don't think it is that similar to myrrh.
 

cacio

Basenotes Plus
Basenotes Plus
Nov 5, 2010
24,055
1,073
Different to my nose. Opoponax is light ambery and fuzzy, myrrh is more incensy and bitter. I think smelling the dyptique candle by those names gives a good reference idea. Of course, when the names appear as notes in a perfume, they could be anything, including some synthetic ambery material without any relation to the true substances.

cacio
 

CapriDog

New member
Mar 1, 2012
14,426
8
Below is from Frangrantica,

"...The aroma of Myrrh can be described as woody, warm, aromatic and pungent, and slightly medicinal....

There is a close connection between myrrh and
opoponax since both come from the genus Commiphora, hence sharing a lot of similar characteristics. However, talking of their aroma, they are like the two end points of a line. Myrrh is bitter while opoponax is sweet and a bit more pleasant and that's the reason it usually referred to as sweet myrrh".
 
Last edited:

saminlondon

Well-known member
Aug 25, 2011
3,249
443
Different to my nose. Opoponax is light ambery and fuzzy, myrrh is more incensy and bitter. I think smelling the dyptique candle by those names gives a good reference idea. Of course, when the names appear as notes in a perfume, they could be anything, including some synthetic ambery material without any relation to the true substances.

cacio

This is a good summary, I think. Myrrh is known for being bitter, whereas opoponax has a sweeter, slightly vanillic edge.
 

rum

Moderator
Basenotes Plus
Mar 17, 2011
16,229
999
Isn't opoponax also known as "sweet myrrh"? I always think of it like that so I know oridinary 'myrrh' is bitter as some have already pointed out. If it has a sweet undertone to it, then it must be opoponax I guess.
 

gandhajala

New member
Sep 3, 2010
8,051
10
Is there a difference between myrhh and Opoponax, can you smell the difference?
yes; yes.
If you're interested in the difference, why not invest in samples of each? It's really the only way to properly learn about different notes/materials.
 
Last edited:

Norstrøm

New member
Mar 25, 2011
5,628
13
As it has been mentioned, opoponax has a sweetness to it, and it can almost have a jammy feel. This aspect of it, is what makes it a great complementary note for dark berries, as their great synergy results in a delicious and balsamic berry jam effect. A prime example of this is Amouage's fantastic Jubilation XXV.
 

mr. reasonable

New member
Jan 1, 2009
8,497
210
Yes and yes.

Smell Myrhh et Delires from Guerlain, or Myrrhe Ardents from Annick Goutal.

Then smell Eau Lente from Diptyque, Opoponax from Les Nereides or even a decent whack of Shalimar.
 

rum

Moderator
Basenotes Plus
Mar 17, 2011
16,229
999
Agree that Eau Lente by Dpityque is a great example of opoponax. There is cinnamon in there too, which shouldn't be confused with the note.
 

hedonist222

New member
Sep 13, 2010
26,978
17
very different actually

myrrh is smoky with this high pitch smell if you can imagine

oppoponax feels thick on the other hand and slightly sweetish

get your nose around the essential oils
 

NebelGeîst

New member
Jan 10, 2016
1,861
3
To me they smell pretty different as well, the raw gum which I've known far longer than I know about their use in perfume actually, as well as the oils. BUT to me opoponax isn't sweeter at all. I was confused reading that it's also called sweet myrrh before knowing the e.o., as the gum always had a kind of foresty balsamic smell. I though the e.o. must smell way different. But when I first got my hands on the oil it pretty much smelled like the resin, but more intense. A resinous, balsamic material with a resemblance to a forest (a bit woody, a bit like leaves and needle on the floor, a tiny bit mossy), maybe some rubber undertones.
Even when I'm trying to blend it, it doesn't turn sweet to my nose. Especially when paired with cypriol the foresty aspects of both seem to complement each other.
But my nose seems to be different anyway. I don't find Angel/A*men sweet either...
 

Forum statistics

Threads
267,089
Messages
5,065,479
Members
205,405
Latest member
Sherm
Top