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Akigalawood is in the air!

cheapimitation

Well-known member
May 15, 2015
2,501
2,982
I've noticed in the past few months the dominant scent profile I've been catching in the air around NYC has been a scratchy dry woody smell that reminds me of akigalawood.

It may or not be that actual ingredient, but there's been a noticeable shift from the BR540 sweet ambroxan accord that used to dominate the airspace, to this scratchy woody patchouly.

I just passed a cloud of it walking through World Trade Center. And I notice this smell starting to dominate perfume counters like Saks which used to be taken over by the BR540 smell.

One time following the launch and large display of a new PdM, the smell at Saks was so strong I got hit in the face with akigakawoid coming up the escalator before I even reached the beauty floor.

Has anyone else noticed this or is NYC ahead of the curve? I wonder what popular fragrance is responsible for this? Could Ganymede really be such a hit it has inspired many imitators the way BR540 did?

I have a feeling the Maison Crivelli counter at Saks is partly to blame there.
 

LinePlaneVolume

Well-known member
May 31, 2020
938
757
Makes me think of the shifts of what's the most popular dog to have in the city. I'm trying to remember what the hot dog was before the French Bulldog trend started back in the late-aughts, early 10's... Dachshunds?

:)

Wish I were still there so I could actually contribute to this fun topic... trend-spotting in the city.
 
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FiveoaksBouquet

Known to SAs
Basenotes Plus
Jul 16, 2004
5,681
6,553
The basenotes directory lists 61 fragrances with Akigalawood and other sites list even more. The scents are across the spectrum, which means it’s no one particular house or level of perfumery. When you say it’s in the air that couldn’t be truer.

Mugler has used it in a number of perfumes. One example, Angel Nova, is a scent I like and wore persistently for a while but the Akigalawood drydown out-persisted me and I began to tire of its sameness.

The problem with those aromachemicals is the perfume comes to a point where all the other notes wear off but the Akigalawood (or similar aromachemical) keeps on going like the Energizer bunny and never changes.
 

hollywoodforever

Well-known member
Sep 29, 2022
482
2,346
Makes me think of the shifts of what's the most popular dog to have in the city. I'm trying to remember what the hot dog was before the French Bulldog trend started back in the late-aughts, early 10's... Dachshunds?
Goldendoodles™. Awful. The absolute worst (air quotes) "breed" of dog ever.

Re: the original topic - I own Ganymede and have been pushing it further and further into the recesses of my perfume cabinet. The opening is novel and nice, but having to endure 48 hours of un-scrubbable akigalawood is just too much to bear. It's hard to describe, but akigalawood reminds me of The Jersey Shore - the show, not the place. Cheap, fun, flashy, tawdry, synthetic, living skin tanned into leather. I think akigalawood is not actually synthesized in a lab, but derived from real patchouli, but with all of the floral elements selectively eliminated and that scratchy, dark, woody stem facet dialed up to 11. Blech.
 

cheapimitation

Well-known member
May 15, 2015
2,501
2,982
It's ironic I posted this and now the only smell in the air is Canadian wildfire!

Makes me think of the shifts of what's the most popular dog to have in the city. I'm trying to remember what the hot dog was before the French Bulldog trend started back in the late-aughts, early 10's... Dachshunds?

:)

Wish I were still there so I could actually contribute to this fun topic... trend-spotting in the city.

It is indeed fun to follow the fragrance trend forecast! Santal 33 is still spotted from time to time but much less than a few years ago and now it feels a bit gauche to still be Santal 33 guy.

The basenotes directory lists 61 fragrances with Akigalawood and other sites list even more. The scents are across the spectrum, which means it’s no one particular house or level of perfumery. When you say it’s in the air that couldn’t be truer.

Mugler has used it in a number of perfumes. One example, Angel Nova, is a scent I like and wore persistently for a while but the Akigalawood drydown out-persisted me and I began to tire of its sameness.

The problem with those aromachemicals is the perfume comes to a point where all the other notes wear off but the Akigalawood (or similar aromachemical) keeps on going like the Energizer bunny and never changes.

Yea that's what I suspect. It has such a recognizable sillage it could be any number of fragrances giving off a similar trail. I was wondering about more accessible brands as I doubt the average person is aware of Ganymede, so the Mugler examples are good to know!


Goldendoodles™. Awful. The absolute worst (air quotes) "breed" of dog ever.

Re: the original topic - I own Ganymede and have been pushing it further and further into the recesses of my perfume cabinet. The opening is novel and nice, but having to endure 48 hours of un-scrubbable akigalawood is just too much to bear. It's hard to describe, but akigalawood reminds me of The Jersey Shore - the show, not the place. Cheap, fun, flashy, tawdry, synthetic, living skin tanned into leather. I think akigalawood is not actually synthesized in a lab, but derived from real patchouli, but with all of the floral elements selectively eliminated and that scratchy, dark, woody stem facet dialed up to 11. Blech.

Yea, I've got a sample and found it an enjoyable and wild ride but wondered how often I'd want to go on that ride. The first time I sampled it was in the evening and my bed sheets smelled of it for weeks.
 

Eclectic

New member
Aug 31, 2023
3
2
Totally agree! Same here in Madrid in 2023 summer. I've recently discovered the note and now I realize it's everywhere. In Spain you can find akigalawood in Zara perfume, which is mainstream department store shop. Fast jump from Niche to mainstrem, we'll see where is the trend going...
 

Eilenberg

Active member
Apr 10, 2021
292
231
Let's keep proportions right; it's still like 1% of people that smell of *anything at all*, so it's not really in the air. However, I've been smelling it recently a lot among people wearing any noticeable perfume, too.
 

saminlondon

Well-known member
Aug 25, 2011
3,247
438
I'm sure I'd recognise it if I smelled it, but I might also struggle to pick it out among in the morass of similar synthetic ingredients. It's been around since 2011, apparently, so there must be lots of it out there.
 

Ken_Russell

Well-known member
Jan 21, 2006
56,719
14,959
Thank you for sharing.

For some reason, did notice this note on the streets of the current city do live in-completely unsolicited, random and/or unexpected-increasingly frequent.
As well as more intense wafts of BOTH mainstream oud AND (obviously mainstream too) ambroxan, in fairly permissive, not very strictly formulaic blends (s) of two or more of these notes.

Apparently quite little to downright not predictable for the fragrance habits of a fairly quaint, unspectacular medium sized Eastern European town.
 
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